FIRST GLIMPSE OF CANON’S NEW 3D VR LENS

Add a whole new dimension to your story with the RF5.2mm F2.8 L Dual Fisheye lens. As part of the EOS VR System – this lens paired with the EOS R5 updated with firmware 1.5.0 or higher and one of Canon’s VR software solutions – you can create immersive 3D that can be experienced when viewed on compatible head mount displays including the Oculus Quest 2 and more.* Viewers will be able to take in the scene with a vivid, wide field of view by simply moving their head. This is the world’s first digital interchangeable lens that can capture stereoscopic 3D 180° VR imagery to a single image sensor.*^ Now, creators can go from traditional stills or video shooting to stereoscopic 3D capture with a simple lens swap. The pairing of this lens and the EOS R5 camera brings high resolution video recording at up to 8K DCI 30p and 4K DCI 60p. With a beautifully engineered folded optical design, the dual high-performance L-series fisheye lenses combine imagery onto a single image sensor delivering impressive results to a single file. This can help simplify your workflow by eliminating the need to sync and stitch multiple video files. An integral part of the EOS VR System, Canon’s EOS VR Utility software can easily convert footage to your choice of editing software. For Adobe® Premiere Pro® users, the EOS VR Plug-in software can help streamline your editing process. Both paid subscription-based software solutions (currently in development with availability and details to follow on or about early 2022) allow for convenient post-production.

SEE WHAT THE IMAGE LOOKS LIKE WITH THIS VIDEO…. AND MAKE SURE YOU WATCH IT TO THE END:

With this lens paired with an EOS R5 camera, creatives, industry professionals and newcomers to VR can create an immersive experience, capturing dynamic scenes for entertainment, tourism, training & education, real estate, storytelling or anywhere you want to bring your audience to.

CANON’S RARE LENS BRINGS BIG MONEY!

Canon’s monster 1200mm f/5.6 L-series supertelephoto lens has just sold for over four times its estimate at a specialist auction in Germany.

The 36lb lens went under the hammer for €400,000 – which works out as $462,321 or £339,142. Wetzlar Camera Auctions had estimated the value ahead of the sale as being €80,000-€100,000.

Canon’s rarest ever lens, the legendary and elusive Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L USM, will be going up for sale in October – and could break its previous record selling price of $180,000 (approximately £127,400 / AU$232,400). 

Why is the Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L USM so rare? Because it is believed that only 20 were ever made – making them almost impossible to come by, and when they appear they always sell for astronomical prices. 

Indeed, even when it was in production from 1993-1997, Canon could only produce two lenses every eighteen months due to the time taken to cultivate the enormous fluorite crystals (which themselves took a year to grow). As such, the lens retailed for some $100,000 (£70,700 / AU$129,000).

Only a handful of Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L USMs have survived – according to Park Cameras, owners may be limited to Canon itself, Sports Illustrated and National Geographic magazines, and spy agencies around the world. 

Indeed, even when it was in production from 1993-1997, Canon could only produce two lenses every eighteen months due to the time taken to cultivate the enormous fluorite crystals (which themselves took a year to grow). As such, the lens retailed for some $100,000 (£70,700 / AU$129,000).

Only a handful of Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L USMs have survived – according to Park Cameras, owners may be limited to Canon itself, Sports Illustrated and National Geographic magazines, and spy agencies around the world. 

So when a sample comes up for sale, it commands a ridiculous price (not least because replacement parts do not exist, so it is necessary to cannibalize another lens in order to repair one), with a lens fetching $180,000 in 2015.

“The world’s largest interchangeable SLR autofocus lens, in terms of both focal length and maximum aperture – available on special order only, each lens was produced after it was actually sold,” reads the Facebook post by Wetzlar Camera Auctions (spotted by Canon Rumors). 

“The annual production volume was approximately two lenses, each lens took more than a year to be built, due to the time required growing its massive fluorite crystals – only very few specimens are known to exist today – offered for sale at our coming auction on October 09th 2021 in Wetzlar!”

NEW NIKON Z9 FLAGSHIP CAMERA ANNOUNCED

NEW NIKON Z9 ANNOUNCED AND SHOULD BE AVAILABLE THIS YEAR

This year has been the announcements of all major brands, it seems, producing and upgrading their “flagship” cameras. Sony started early, then Canon, then Panasonic, then Fuji Film, and now Nikon. Those die-hard Nikon owners will look at this as the dream camera to get. It’s strong, shoots in 8K video, and, Nikon develops it’s own processing chip for this camera. Too many back-orders on chips, if the Covid thing is going to effect the chip industry, now you will see the manufactures, make their own amazing chips. Looks like photographers around the world, are rejoicing.

Nikon has finally started releasing “teasers” to get people excited about their new camera. Here is one new video. Click the arrow in the middle, and enjoy:

With the fact that the Nikon Z9 showed up at the Tokyo Olympics, we now know a lot about the camera:

1- 8K video

One of the few details that the Big N did announce is that the Nikon Z9 will boast 8K video capability, putting it in the same league as the Canon EOS R5 and Sony A1

2) Full-frame stacked sensor

Also among the scant announcement info was the fact that the Z9 will, unsurprisingly, have a full-frame FX CMOS image sensor. What is surprising, however, is that this will be a newly developed stacked sensor. 

So, what is a stacked image sensor? It is a fabrication process whereby layers of both sensor and circuitry are be ‘stacked’ on top of one another, enabling manufacturers to make things like RAM an integrated part of the sensor itself. 

Accordingly, stacked sensors can perform blisteringly fast readout speeds – resulting in the unfathomably fast 30fps continuous burst shooting of the Sony A1 and Canon EOS R3

3) >39MP resolution

So, knowing that the Nikon Z9 is capable of 8K, and that it has a full-frame sensor, we know broadly what resolution it will have – because to output 8K, a requisite number of pixels are required. Indeed, in crude terms, we can look to the 45MP R5 and 50.1MP A1 and say that it’s going to be in the same ball park – and a previous report suggested that the Z9 may have around the same resolution as the 45.7MP Nikon Z7 II

We don’t just have to guesstimate, though! For full readout 8K on a standard 3:2 sensor, a 16:9 video would require 7,680 x 5,120 pixels – which would require at least a 39MP sensor. However, if the video is DCi then it would require 8,192 pixels – which means at least a 44MP sensor. 

So we can safely say that the Z9 will have at least a 39MP image sensor, and likely a lot higher.

Photo by Nikon

4) New Expeed 7 image processor

Nikon develops their own chip. No Covid slowdown.

Nikon has confirmed that the Z9 will possess a brand new image processing engine – which, seeing as the current engine is the Expeed 6 (featured in cameras like the Nikon Z6 II, Nikon Z7 II and D6), will almost certainly be called Expeed 7. 

What do processors in cameras actually do? Well, they’re effectively the ‘brain’ of the camera body. They handle all the complex computations: performing autofocus and subject detection, parsing stills and video data from the image sensor, providing calculations for image stabilization, corrections for lens aberrations, cleaning up noise from high ISO imaging… 

In short, while it’s not a very sexy part of a spec sheet, the image processor is one of the most fundamental parts of a camera’s DNA. 

5) D6-beating flagship

The Nikon Z9 will be the manufacturer’s new flagship camera, replacing the Nikon D6 as the current king of the hill. And as confirmed by Nikon’s Keiji Oishi – department manager of Nikon’s Imaging Business Unit, UX Planning Department – it “is being developed with the goal of surpassing the D6.” 

Clearly, with at least a 39MP sensor that’s capable of 8K video, it’s going to beat the D6 (with its 20.8MP and 4K) in terms of sheer resolution. However, what about speed? This is, after all, the most important aspect for a flagship camera that’s aimed at professional sports photographers. 

The D6 boasts a top speed of 14fps burst shooting, which is barely worth a second glance when the Sony A1 hits 30fps and the Canon EOS R5, Canon EOS R6 and Canon EOS-1D X Mark III all hit 20fps. 

Given that the Nikon Z9 features a stacked sensor, it’s reasonable to assume that it will hit at least the 20fps benchmark set by Canon – if not the lofty 30fps of the A1.

6) ‘Pro DSLR’ body

Traditionally, flagship cameras have featured an integrated vertical grip with mirrored controls for seamless switching between portrait and landscape shooting. 

Currently, the only other full-frame flagship mirrorless camera is the Sony A9 II, which eschews this ‘professional DSLR’ form factor in favor of a standard-sized body (with the option to add a vertical grip). However, the Z9 will follow in the footsteps of the D6 and 1D X Mark III with a larger body featuring the integrated grip and dual-control inputs. 

7) Larger battery

One of the most important aspects of a flagship, professional camera isn’t the resolution or even the speed – it’s the battery life. Wildlife photographers can sit out in the field for days on end, and sports photographers gobble up power in a hurry when shooting at maximum burst modes, so battery life is important – and this is even more true when it comes to mirrorless cameras, which are much greedier than their DSLR counterparts.

8) Physical observations

The fact that the Nikon Z9 possesses the pro DSLR form factor means that it will also accommodate a huge, professional camera battery – something that mirrorless cameras until now have been sorely lacking. 

Nikon has only released official images of the front of the body (though it does disclaim that “the appearance of the camera may differ from the photo shown”), but in July the Z9 was spotted being used at the Olympic Games in Tokyo – giving us a good look at the back of the body as well. And now we have seen a better view of the back in the two teaser videos that Nikon has recently released.

The Mode dial is replaced by a bank of buttons – the bracketing button is visible, there will likely be a Mode button to cycle between PASM, metering and WB functions. There’s seems to be a locking knob next to it, suggesting that the bottom portion rotates – which could be for quick selection between single / continuous / self-timer / M-Up shooting modes. And the rubber hatches on the top will be for flash, and possibly Nikon’s 10-pin interface.

Nikon clearly knew that the photo industry paparazzi would spot the Z9 at the Olympics, because all the leaked photos of it have what looks like a strip of duct tape on the hinge of the rear LCD – disguising whether or not it’s a tilting or fully articulating screen (though the two finger tabs at the bottom-left and right suggest that it may only tilt). However, that aside, there’s plenty of other takeaways from these glimpses.

The Z9 differs from the pro DSLR equivalent D6 in numerous ways, not least the omission of the smaller, secondary rear LCD screen. The button placement has also been significantly rearranged, and has more in common with the layout of the Nikon Z6 and Nikon Z7.

9) 2021 release

Nikon announced that the Nikon Z9 is scheduled for release this year. Previous rumors have suggested that it will be in the hands of professionals shooting at the Tokyo Olympic Games in July, so that seems like an obvious time for a full announcement if not immediate availability. Either way, the Z9 is coming in 2021… and now the teaser videos have started we feel certain that the full announcement must be coming soon.

This article is courtesy of Digital Camera World. Where they keep track of it all.

CENTERING YOUR PORTRAIT?

give your subject space to look into

Once asked: ‘When taking pictures of people which side is it best to put them on, the right or the left?’

As a rule (and we all know that they are made to be broken) if the person (and it works with animals too) you are photographing is looking in one direction or even if their head is pointing in that direction it is best to place them on the opposite side of the frame.

give your subject space to look into

You’ll see it best illustrated in the images on this page – in each case the person is not being photographed head on but have their head pointing either to the left or the right. As a result the photographer has given them some space on the side that they are pointing/looking.

The reason for this is that when a person views an image with a person looking in one direction or the other their eyes also are drawn in that direction. In a sense you’re giving the subject of your image some space to look into and in doing so create a natural way for the photos viewer to flow into the photo also.

Even just a slight turn of the head can be effectively framed using this technique.

Breaking the Rule

Of course, breaking this rule produces interesting shots (in some cases more so). They might not be as aesthetically pleasing on some levels and could leave those viewing your images feeling a little on edge but this type of reaction to photos can be quite powerful also.

HERE ARE JUST A FEW MORE EXAMPLES OF WHAT WE MEAN:

Photo by Omid Armin on Unsplash

The above article is courtesy of Darren Rowse with Digital photography school.

SHOOT BLACK AND WHITE TO IMPROVE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

Photo by Javant Kulkarni / The Art of Black and White

Have you ever done black and white photos? Do you think that there is a place for black and white in your repertoire? Are you not sure how to do black and white?

Let’s take care of all those questions and get you excited about taking black and white photos. Black and white is, what I like to call: “The true art of Photography”. Whether that is right or not, is totally up to you, but, I can take you to some black and white photos, and it would be breathtaking to see it.

The above photo is a great example of an artistic approach to black and white. And, I think there are a lot of people who would love to take a photo like that.

If you research old photography masters such as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston, you’ll notice they photographed primarily in black and white. Now, part of this had to do with technical limitations of the time. Until the 1930s, color photography was tough to produce. Yet even once Kodachrome, a color film, was invented, plenty of photographers stuck to black and white, simply because they preferred it to color.

Why? One reason is that black and white presents interesting creative problems. The world looks different in black and white, which means that you can think about tone, texture, and light in new ways. In fact, when you remove color, the emphasis of an image naturally shifts to other compositional elements.

For some photographers, this can feel freeing; you’re no longer stuck thinking constantly about color but can instead focus on the more fundamental aspects of photography: tone and light.

grayscale photography of woman wearing veil
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

1. Black and white helps you see differently

If you research old photography masters such as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston, you’ll notice they photographed primarily in black and white. Now, part of this had to do with technical limitations of the time. Until the 1930s, color photography was tough to produce. Yet even once Kodachrome, a color film, was invented, plenty of photographers stuck to black and white, simply because they preferred it to color.

Why? One reason is that black and white presents interesting creative problems. The world looks different in black and white, which means that you can think about tone, texture, and light in new ways. In fact, when you remove color, the emphasis of an image naturally shifts to other compositional elements.

For some photographers, this can feel freeing; you’re no longer stuck thinking constantly about color but can instead focus on the more fundamental aspects of photography: tone and light.

As I look around the internet for black and white photos, I just wish that people understood black and white better. There are far too many photographers, who take the photo in color, then convert it to black and white, without even caring about the artistic nature of black and white.

As you’re probably aware, not all great color images will translate well to black and white. But the inverse is also true: certain images that look great and black and white won’t look good in color, which means that you’ll have a whole new set of photo opportunities to contemplate.

2. Black and white eliminates distractions

Photo by Lanny Cottrell photogrpahy

The world in color is great, but sometimes it can be a bit overwhelming.

Specifically, there are plenty of distractions that exist in color that simply disappear when converted to black and white.

For instance, a rainbow shirt in a color portrait may draw the eye, but is essentially unnoticeable in B&W. And a distracting red rock in the foreground of a seascape might turn a nice neutral gray following a black and white conversion.

Plus, color itself can take away emphasis on contrast, texture, lighting, shape, and form. If you’re photographing a weathered man with a face full of wrinkles, black and white will highlight the texture of the wrinkles, the intensity of the man’s age. Whereas color will simply distract the viewer and prevent them from seeing what the photo is all about.

Photo by Atilla Hangyasi (2) / The Art of Black and White

Black and white can also eliminate distracting color casts that would otherwise subtly shift the viewer’s attention away from what matters.

3. Black and white offers increased creative choice

greyscale photography of woman holding umbrella
Photo by Kha Ruxury on Pexels.com

Since the world is in color, it is safe to say that color photography is more realistic and descriptive. A color photo depicts the world as it really is – whereas black and white photos only show a version of reality, one that seems more interpretive and creative.

In a sense, this can help you break free from certain restraints. Without color, you don’t have to show the world as it is; instead, you can show what you see, which might involve unusual relationships, interesting shadows, beautiful textures, and so on.

Ultimately, when you take away color, you remove what your viewer is used to seeing. Suddenly, you have to capture the viewer’s attention without the help of color – which also means that you’re free to have fun, experiment, and show the world in a completely new, creative way.

So in a way, black and white forces you to think, but it makes you more creative in the process.

4. Black and white adds emotion and mood

two bare trees
Photo by Todd Trapani on Pexels.com

When you look at the photos that have been in this article so far, do feel a certain mood or feeling with them?

Personally, I think black and white photos almost always create a wonderful mood – or in cases where the mood is already present, the B&W conversion makes it even more intense.

Why does black and white photography go hand in hand with moodiness? I’m not completely sure, but something about tonal range, rich blacks, and deep contrast just appeals to us psychologically. It creates an emotional connection, and it makes you stop, look around, and pay attention.

5. Black and white photography feels timeless

Here’s a common reason why photographers shoot in black and white:

It adds a timelessness to your images.

For one, black and white photography has existed since the beginnings of photography, which means that a black and white image cannot instantly be dated. Also, color schemes change over time, especially in clothing, business logos, cars, and architecture. Therefore, a color image will often include datable elements – but in black and white, these features may be much harder to place.

Personally, I feel that black and white photos seem to transcend reality. Look at the image below. Can you tell when it was taken? Is it a recent shot? Is it from 50 years ago? Or does it exist outside of time?

Photo by Niko Akin / The Art of Black and White

Most of this blog today is compliments of Nisha Ramroop from the Digital Photography School.

Do you have a particular subject on photography you would like to see? Then try this amazing “search engine” and find your subject here:

TODAY’S INSPIRATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY QUOTE:

When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in Black and white, you photograph their souls!

Ted Grant