PHOTO EXPERIENCES FOR ADRENALINE JUNKIES:

Photos of the Week: 4/18/2019: 22 Bucket List Experiences for the Adrenaline Junkies!

WORLD-CLASS THRILLS

Traveling is enough of a thrill for most people, but some adrenaline junkies thirst for a more heart-pounding experience than placid sightseeing trips. Adventures abound all over the world, even for seniors who aren’t quite ready to hop on a big tour bus for their next trip. We’ve scoured the globe for some of the most hair-raising, blood-tingling things you won’t believe travelers pay to do.


LOOKING INTO THE ABYSS FROM DEVIL’S POOL
Victoria Falls, Zambia 
Just gazing at breathtaking Victoria Falls would be enough for most travelers, but the truly fearless can swim up to the edge of the 350-foot drop. Devil’s Pool is a natural swimming hole on the Zambezi River with a rock lip that separates those swimming inside it from certain death, even as the water gushing around them flows over the precipice and into the void.
Courtesy of Zambia Tourism


HIKING THE SHEER HEIGHTS OF HALF DOME
Yosemite National Park, California 
Hiking up Yosemite National Park’s iconic Half Dome is a bucket-list thrill for many experienced hikers, but the approach is nothing short of deadly. The most nerve-wracking part of the trek takes hikers up 400 vertical feet of sheer rock wall that can only be traversed with the help of a system of cables, poles, and 2-by-4 boards. Think you can hack it? You’ll need a permit, gloves, grippy shoes, and nerves of steel, of course.
Photo courtesy of Lynn N. Yelp.com



VOLCANO BOARDING AT HIGH SPEEDS
Cerro Negro, Nicaragua 
If you long for a thrill that’s sure to spark interesting dinner conversations, head to Nicaragua’s Cerro Negro volcano. There, you can don an orange jumpsuit, grab a plywood and metal board with a rope attached, then fly down the dark basalt slope at speeds topping out around a staggering 60 mph. Adding to the thrill: Cerro Negro is still an active volcano, having last erupted in 1999. (Even the most adventurous travellers should also take into account the State Department’s travel advisory for Nicaragua due to recent civil unrest.)
Photo courtesy of faracowski / I stockphoto



SWIMMING WITH GIANT CROCODILES IN THE CAGE OF DEATH
Darwin, Australia 
What thrill seeker can resist an attraction called the “Cage of Death”? While there’s a little bit of creative license involved here (the cage is really a clear plastic tube), hopping inside means you get dunked into a pool infested with massive crocodiles at a Darwin aquarium. Some of the beasts are longer than 16 feet, and crocodile handlers like to further whip them into a tizzy with regular feeding times.
Photo courtesy of: Crocosaurus.cove / Facebook.com



SCRAMBLING TO SAFETY AT THE RUNNING OF THE BULLS
Pamplona, Spain 
The most well-known bucket-list experience for the (very) adventurous traveler? Arguably, the running of the bulls in Pamplona, Spain. A tradition that dates back to the 13th century, the bull run is part of the festival of San Fermin in July and is open to anyone over 18 — as long as they’re sober, that is. Surprisingly, the run is only a half-mile long, but that doesn’t mean it’s not dangerous. At least 15 people have died after being gored by the bulls since 1924.
Photo courtesy of: mmeee/ istockphoto.com




CHASING TORNADOS
Oklahoma 
Most of us can’t get away from tornadoes fast enough, but a select group of travelers makes a beeline toward them instead. Tour operators like Extreme Tornado Tours specialize in meteorologist-led storm tours that deliberately take weather watchers as close as possible to monstrous super-cell thunderstorms and, if possible, the twisters they spawn all across Tornado Alley.
Photo courtesy of: Extreme Tornado tours /Facebook.com



VENTURING INTO THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE
Ukraine 
Visiting Chernobyl is a different kind of thrill — the thrill of walking in a post-apocalyptic place you know most people wouldn’t touch with a 10-foot pole. A partial nuclear meltdown in 1986 forced the evacuation of countless residents and the creation of a roughly 1,000-square-mile exclusion zone here. But tourists are allowed to visit, because even with a visit to the gates of the infamous reactor itself, they only receive a dose of radiation roughly the same as what you’d get on a one-hour flight. More dangerous might be the lack of safety barriers and crumbling buildings included on the tour.
Photo courtesy of : Trip Advisor.com



TRAVERSING THE MOUNT HUA PLANK WALK
Huayin, China 
The infamous plank walk on China’s Mount Hua looks so heart-stoppingly insane that it’s hard to believe it actually exists. But it does: Planks of wood bolted to the sheer rock face of the mountain, thousands of feet in the air, with long lines of fearless hikers traversing them. Part of the journey doesn’t even have boards, just footholds carved directly into the rock. Official statistics on safety are hard to come by, but some have estimated up to 100 deaths per year.
Photo courtesy of: Tripadvisor.com



DEFYING GRAVITY AT THE CN TOWER EDGE WALK
Toronto 
If the thought of walking on a 5-foot ledge 1,165 feet up in the air is more exhilarating than intimidating, head to Toronto. The city’s landmark CN Tower hosts EdgeWalk, which allows visitors to gear up in jumpsuits and harnesses and spend a half-hour drinking in the views and defying gravity. Participants can even (carefully) lean out over the platform’s edge for a truly heart-pounding experience.
Photo courtesy of: Tripadvisor.com



CYCLING THE HAIRPIN TURNS OF NORTH YUNGAS ROAD
Bolivia 
Thrill-seeking cyclists have undoubtedly heard about Bolivia’s Yungas Road, a narrow route in the Andes with blind hairpin turns, few guardrails, and deadly drop-offs galore. The altitude alone is enough to keep many away: Most cyclists start their ride at over 15,000 feet. And while the road attracts thousands of mountain bikers every year, it’s undeniably dangerous: At least three mountain bikers have died since 2014, and the road has claimed countless more motorists.
Photo courtesy of: Filrom/istock photo



CAGE DIVING WITH GREAT WHITE SHARKS
South Africa 
Willingly tossing specially formulated chum into the water to attract Great Whites? Just another part of the experience when you agree to dive with some of the world’s most aggressive sharks off the coast of South Africa. Participants get up close and personal with the sharks when they’re dunked into the ocean in a galvanized steel cage. No diving experience is required — participants simply hold their breath.
Photo courtesy of : Great white shark tours / Facebook.com



BUNGEE JUMPING INTO A VOLCANO
Villarrica Volcano, Chile 
It sounds too preposterous to be true, but the most fearless travelers can pay many thousands of dollars to bungee jump into one of Chile’s most active volcanoes. A helicopter flies jumpers inside of the Villarrica volcano’s caldera, and they plummet 350 to 400 feet toward a pool of bubbling molten lava. You even get to travel back to the airport dangling from the bungee. No matter that you could die, the website acknowledges — you’ll be signing a waiver and receiving “a cool T-shirt.”
Photo courtesy of: Dan Watson / you tube.com



BRAVING THE FORMULA ROSSA ROLLER COASTER
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 
For the ultimate man-made thrill, it doesn’t get much more intense than the Formula Rossa roller coaster at Ferrari World Abu Dhabi. The world’s fastest rollercoaster catapults riders from 0 to 149 mph in just 5 seconds using a hydraulic launch system much like the ones that aircraft carriers use to launch off the deck of fighter jets.
Photo courtesy of : miles_around/ istock photos




TRAVERSING THE ZHANGJIAJIE GLASS BRIDGE
Zhangjiajie, China 
Glass observation decks and skywalks are popping up all over the place, from Chicago’s Willis Tower to swanky cruise ships. The most terrifying, however, might be in China, where the 1,400-foot-long, 900-foot-high Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge stretches across a forested canyon. Still shaking your head? Officials have driven cars onto it and pounded it with sledgehammers to assure terrified tourists that it’s safe to walk on.
Photo courtesy of: Media Production / istock photo




SPINNING AT HIGH SPEEDS ABOVE THE STRIP WITH INSANITY
Las Vegas 
When gambling isn’t enough of a thrill, head to the top of Stratosphere Hotel in Las Vegas and take a ride on Insanity. Its mechanical arm will dangle you 64 feet over the tower’s edge, at a height of more than 900 feet. Not enough? You’ll be angled at up to 70 degrees while you spin at G-forces comparable to what astronauts feel during shuttle launches. Just be sure to savor the view of the Strip when you finally slow down.
Photo by: Tripadvisor.com




CLIMBING TO THE TOP OF SYDNEY’S HARBOR BRIDGE
Sydney, Australia 
Why stop at snapping photos of landmarks when you can scale them instead? In Sydney, brave tourists can climb 440 feet up the Harbour Bridge for sweeping views of the Australian capital, including the famed Sydney Opera House. Climbs proceed in nearly any kind of weather, ascending more than 1,300 stairs and several ladders along the bridge’s outer arch.
Photo courtesy of: CBCK-Christine/ istock photo




BUNGEE JUMPING FROM MACAU TOWER
Macau 
Bungee jumping has long been a staple for the truly adventurous traveler, but a jump from the Macau Tower? Now that’s extreme. It’s the world’s highest commercial bungee jump at a mind-boggling 764 feet, and if a daytime jump isn’t thrilling enough, you can even do it at night. Jumpers also have the option of strapping on a GoPro to get the ultimate souvenir that will let them relive the rush again and again.
Photo courtesy of: David F /istock photo




SLEEPING CLIFFSIDE AT SKYLODGE ADVENTURE SUITES
Sacred Valley, Peru 
Sleeping rarely shows up on a thrill-seeker’s bucket list, but what about when you can catch some zzz’s in a 24-by-8-foot glass pod hanging off the side of a cliff? Now we’re talking. Plus, getting to the Skylodge Adventure Suites is half the fun, requiring a 1,300-foot climb up a near-vertical rock face, or a trail hike with plenty of zip lines. A gourmet dinner is also part of the experience.
Photo courtesy of: airbnb.com




WING WALKING ATOP A WWII BIPLANE
United Kingdom 
Sure, sky diving’s a scream, but for something a little more unique, wing walking may be just the ticket. Several companies in the U.K. like AeroSuperBatics offer tourists the chance to channel their inner World War II daredevil and clamor up onto the top wing of a biplane — fully harnessed, of course — and take to the skies for 10 minutes of thrills at up to 150 mph. The pilot will even oblige returning wing walkers with some serious aerobatics.
Photo courtesy of: AerosuperbaticswingwalkersOfficial/Facebook.com




SCRAMBLE ACROSS INDIA WITH A RICKSHAW RUN
India 
The Rickshaw Run is a completely different kind of thrill — or, in the words of its organizers, “the least sensible thing to do with your time off.” You’ll cross the entire country of India, a two-and-a-half week journey that could seem like a sedate sightseeing opportunity if it weren’t for the rickshaw itself. Prone to breaking down or tipping over, it’s “a wholly unsuitable vehicle.” There’s also the fact that there’s no defined route: Just a start line, a finish line, and an entire subcontinent in between.
Photo courtesy of: Rickshaw run/ Facebook.com



BOBSLEDDING SALT LAKE CITY’S OLYMPIC TRACK
Utah 
Outside of skiing, bobsledding is one of the most dangerous sports at the Winter Olympics. So what better way to pay homage to the titans of the track than by speeding down it yourself? You can do it during the winter at Salt Lake City’s 2002 Olympic track, an “aggressive, intense, bumpy ride” that lasts less than a minute, but one that will give you bragging rights every four years from here on out.
Photo courtesy: utaholympiclegacy.org



ZIPLINING UNDERGROUND THROUGH MINE TUNNELS
Wales 
Above ground, Wales offers an abundance of gorgeous green countryside. Below, there’s something far less sedate: Miles of abandoned mine tunnels that thrill seekers can explore for hours during an all-day tour. One of the highlights? Nine “disgustingly high” underground zip lines, including the world’s longest,426-foot “Goliath,” and the world’s deepest. Not enough? You also get to experience a 70-foot underground freefall, traverse decaying wooden bridges, and creep along high cliff walls.
Photo courtesy of: go-below.co.uk.com



THIS SPECIAL PRESENTATION WAS PRESENTED ON MSN.COM AND WAS PUBLISHED BY:

Cheapism
AND THE ARTICLE WAS ORIGINALLY PREPARED BY: SAUNDRA LATHAM.

This is blog # 954
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5 SECRETS TO STUNNING BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY:

Every place in the world we live in, there are different types of birds to take photos of. God has placed beautiful birds in all areas of the world. And that gives us photographers a chance to take advantage of some beautiful photos that we can certainly add to our portfolios. Have you ever looked at some photos taken by photographers and thought: hmm, that’s a nice photo of the twigs or tree branches, I wish I could really see the bird? Too many times we see birds and think it is great to take a photo of the bird through all the branches and leaves and shrubbery. Here is a great article I found from the experts: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY SCHOOL, the people who know how to do it right.

Do you want to capture stunning bird photography…

…that goes beyond the usual, standard bird photos?

You can!

In this article, I’ll give you 5 bird photography secrets that will ensure you consistently create incredible bird images.

Images that are creative, unique, and original.

Sound good?

Let’s dive right in!

1. Get Low for Gorgeous Bird Photography Backgrounds

Here’s the bread-and-butter of creative bird photography:

Get down low.

Really low.

It may seem tough. You might prefer to stay up high, away from the dirt and water and mud.

But if you want incredible bird photos, you’ve got to get out of your comfort zone. You’ve got to get down low.

Specifically, you need to get on a level with the bird. Your lens should be about even with the bird’s eye.

Why is this so important?

When you shoot from down low, the distance between the bird and the background is greatly increased. And that causes the background to be far more blurred.

Therefore, you’ll capture some beautiful bokeh.

And beautiful bokeh?

Makes for a stunning bird photo.

This is how professionals capture such dreamy backdrops in their bird photography.

They get down as low as they can go. That’s all.

It really does make a huge difference!

Try it. I can guarantee that you won’t regret the resulting shots.

2. Shoot in water for stunning reflections

Do you want to capture especially gorgeous bird photography?

One of my favorite ways to do this…

…is to shoot reflections.

Let me explain:

A photo of a bird is nice. It’s standard. It can be beautiful.

But if you add a reflection, the image immediately becomes far more captivating. Viewers are instantly sucked into the scene.

The reflection adds a sense of subtle beauty and delicateness – one that you can’t get any other way.

Now, here’s how you capture gorgeous bird reflections:

First, shoot by still water.

Mudflats (with puddles) work well. Same with sheltered lakes.

If you’re struggling to find water still enough to generate full reflections, try shooting during the early morning. That’s when the wind tends to be a lot less noticeable.

Second, make sure the sun is low in the sky. (The lower, the better.) This will ensure that the reflection includes some nice colors.

You also have to be careful not to get too low over the water.

Why?

If you’re too low, the full reflection won’t come through. And a broken reflection has far less power than a full reflection.

Bottom line?

Find some birds near the water, and start taking photos!

3. Capture action for compelling bird photos

One of the biggest problems with beginning bird photography…

…is that it’s static.

The bird just stands in the frame.

And while there are methods of making this type of photo work, it’s often just a boring photo.

That’s why you should spice up your bird photos using action

Once you’ve found a subject, watch it through your camera. Keep your finger on the shutter button.

Then, as soon as it starts to move, take a burst of photos. The more photos, the better!

Of course, you’re going to have a lot of failed shots. But you’ll also capture some keepers. And these will (with a little luck) blow you away!

Some of my favorite shots involve birds flapping their wings, preening, or feeding. If you wait for this behavior, you’ll get some stellar action shots.

One thing I’d recommend:

When you’re watching a bird through the camera viewfinder, keep some space between the bird and the edge of the frame.

Because birds can rapidly change their size – just by opening their wings. And clipped body parts are one of the easiest ways to ruin a bird photo.

Just remember these tips, and you’ll be capturing some great action photos in no time!

4. Shoot through vegetation for unique images

Another way to capture original images…

…is to find a subject.

Get down low.

And shoot through some vegetation.

This creates a gorgeous foreground wash – one that frames the subject without dominating the photo.

To pull this off, you generally have to lie flat on the ground. I advise experimenting with a few different angles – move around your subject, testing different possible foregrounds.

Note: It’s important that the vegetation is very close to your lens (and very far from your subject). Because the farther the vegetation is from your lens, the more in focus (and distracting) it becomes.

It’s also important to limit the amount of vegetation in the photo. You don’t want to cover up the bird entirely. Instead, you want to frame the bird with the vegetation.

Make sense?

Then start taking some shots with a foreground wash. You’ll love the shots you get.

5. Capture silhouettes for dramatic bird shots

Here’s one more way to capture creative bird photos:

Shoot silhouettes!

Silhouettes are really easy to pull off – and they look incredible.

Here’s how you do it:

Go out as the sun is just about to set. Find a subject (birds with a clear outline are best).

Then change your position so that the bird is between you and the setting sun. Ideally, the bird blocks the sun from your camera. This will prevent the sky from being completely blown out.

Make sure that the bird is in front of as much of the sky as possible.

That is, you want to frame the bird with sky – and you don’t want any dark patches behind the bird (from trees or other objects).

If you’re struggling with this, try getting down as low as you can. Because the lower you get, the more sky you’ll include in the frame.

Finally, ensure that you drastically underexpose your subject. One trick is to set the exposure based on the sky next to the bird.

That way, you’ll get a beautiful sky – with a nicely silhouetted subject.

Creative bird photography: next steps

Now you know how to capture stunning, original bird photos.

You know how to produce amazing backgrounds.

You know how to generate interest.

And you know how to capture incredible foregrounds.

The next step…

…is to get out and shoot!

Have any tips for creative bird photography? Share them in the comments!


The post 5 Secrets for Stunning Creative Bird Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

This is blog #953

Here is some more stunning bird photos:

Photo by Bradley Howington on Pexels.com

Photo by Marko Blazevic on Pexels.com


Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com


Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com


Photo of the Week


HOW TO BE CREATIVE WITH A WIDE ANGLE LENS:

A wide angle lens in your arsenal, once you understand what you can do with it, you will quickly find out, will be one of your most used lenses because it becomes the lens you will use to be “creative” with. When I first got into photography, I thought the telephoto or the zoom lens would be the most widely used lens, but, as I started taking photos, I find that the wide angle lens is the one that is the one I like to shoot with the most. Let’s look at some things that you can use it with that will make it a logical choice in your photography choices:

Wide angle lenses have tremendous creative potential. The way they affect perspective and line helps you make dynamic and exciting images. Yet, care is required to get the best out of them. It takes a little thought to avoid the messy compositions characteristic of photos taken with wide angle lenses by careless photographers.

Fog and mist

1. USE YOUR WIDE ANGLE LENS WHEN IT’S FOGGY OR MISTY

Wide-angle lenses are useful for shooting in adverse weather conditions like mist and fog. You can move in close to your subject (in this case a fishing boat in Galicia, photographed with an 18mm lens on an APS-C camera – see above) and because you are fairly close, it is more or less unaffected by the fog.

The result is a nice contrast between the sharp foreground and the soft background. The fog also simplifies a potentially messy composition by obscuring whatever is in the distance.

If you shot a scene like this with a longer focal length, the boats would be much harder to see through the fog.

Both are valid techniques for photographing a foggy scene. It’s just a question of deciding which approach you’d like to take, then selecting the most appropriate lens.

2. ADD FOREGROUND INTEREST TO LANDSCAPE PHOTOS

As wide-angle lenses make objects that are not close to the camera look smaller there is a risk that the most interesting part of the landscape is pushed away into the distance, leaving the uninteresting parts of the scene to dominate the foreground.

To counter this you need foreground interest— something in the front third of the image that captures the eye.

It may help to mentally divide the frame into thirds. Each third requires something interesting to look at to pull the eye through the frame. Filling each region effectively also helps create a sense of depth.

You need some foreground interest in the first third, an interesting part of the landscape (such as trees or mountains) in the middle third and finally some interesting texture or color in the sky. Treat this as a guide, not a rule, and bear in mind the thirds don’t need to be of equal size.

The photo below (taken with an 18mm lens, APS-C) has an interesting foreground (jagged rocks), more rocks in the middle ground and an island with a distinct shape on the horizon. The eye naturally follows the rocks through the photo to the island and the distant cliffs.


Foreground

3. TAKE THE “SIMPLIFY YOUR COMPOSITION” CHALLENGE

With wide angle lenses it’s easy to include too much in the photo and end up with a cluttered composition. A good exercise, and a great way to improve your images, is to keep the composition as simple as possible.

That usually means getting in close to the subject and framing it in a way that keeps the background as uncluttered as you can. It won’t always work – depending on the scene there are times when it’s impossible to avoid a busy composition. But keep the principle in mind and apply it when you can.

For the photo below (taken with an 18mm lens, APS-C) I simplified the composition by using a slow shutter speed (240 seconds) to blur the movement of the sea. The sky is nearly empty of clouds, further simplifying the design.

This principle applies to all types of subject, not just landscape photography.


Simple Composition

4. PHOTOGRAPH THE NIGHT SKY

Wide-angle lenses are really useful for taking landscape photos at night. Their wide angle-of-view is essential to capture the glory and scope of the stars and milky way. The shorter the focal length, the more sky you can capture. Ultra-wides can be really useful for this.

There are two ways to take photos of stars at night.

The first is to use a relatively fast shutter speed (usually around 20 seconds) to freeze the motion of the stars, so the camera records them as pinpricks of light.

A prime lens or wide-angle zoom with a maximum aperture of f2.8 or greater is useful as it gives you the option of opening the aperture to let more light in, allowing you to keep the ISO down.

The second way is to use longer exposures to capture the curved star trails created by the Earth’s rotation. Wide aperture lenses may also come in useful here, as keeping the ISO low both maximizes image quality and reduces long exposure noise.

This photo was taken with an 18mm lens at Lake Tekapo in New Zealand.


Night Sky

5. PHOTOGRAPH PEOPLE IN THE LANDSCAPE

Another effective technique is to include people in the photo. Getting close to a person with a wide-angle lens creates a strong focal point, and lets the landscape sweep away into the distance. The human figure creates a sense of scale. A small figure amongst a dramatic landscape, even more so.

There are two approaches to including human figures in the landscape.

One is to create a portrait of the person, using the landscape as a backdrop. A wide angle lens lets you get close to the person, yet include lots of background. This is different to a telephoto lens, which would also let you get close to the person (or make them large in the frame), but would exclude most of the background, throwing it out of focus if you use a wide aperture.

The other is to use the person (or people) as human figures. Anonymous, but there to provide interest, a point of reference, a focal point or scale. In this case the figures may well be small in the frame, an effective way of showing the scale and drama of a particular landscape.

This portrait of a friend of mine uses the first approach. It was taken with a wide-angle zoom set to 25mm on a full-frame camera.


Portrait in a Landscape

6. USE YOUR WIDE ANGLE LENS TO TAKE PHOTOS OF BUILDINGS

You can use wide-angle lenses to take photos of buildings, both from the outside and the inside.

Inside, a wide-angle lens might be a necessity and the only way to include a significant part of a room or the inside of a large structure like a church or cathedral.

This holds true outside as well, especially if you are close to the building. Depending on its size, you will probably only be able to include the building in its entirety from a distance.

In the photo below (taken with an 18mm lens, APS-C) the tower, positioned at one of the corners of the wall surrounding Beijing’s Forbidden City, is shown in its environment. The use of a wide-angle lens includes enough of the scene to create a sense of space and serenity.


Building

7. USE YOUR WIDE ANGLE LENS TO EMPHASIZE LINE AND SHAPE

Exploit the exaggerated perspective of wide angle lenses whenever you can. Look for lines that lead towards the subject or the horizon. They add depth by taking the eye through the image from the foreground to the horizon, and create a sense of motion or flow through the photo.

Wide-angle lenses emphasize and exaggerate line. You can use this to your advantage by placing them in a way that leads the eye into and through the image rather than out of it. This is where the fun element of wide-angles comes in – a simple change in position can alter the composition, and the way that lines run into and through it, dramatically. Experiment with point-of-view and line and see what happens.

Wide-angle lenses can also emphasize shape, especially with photos of man-made objects like buildings. Two things drew me to the scene in the photo below (taken with a 14mm lens, APS-C). The first was the dramatic shape of the house. The second was the corresponding shapes made by the road markings. Both are emphasized by the black and white conversion and high contrast treatment.


Line and Shape

8. CREATE AN ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAIT

Wide angle lenses are idea for environmental portraiture and this is an approach often adopted by documentary photographers and photojournalists.

A good approach for this type of photography is use a moderate wide angle lens. If your lens is too wide you may get too close and make your sitter uncomfortable. Try and keep your focal lengths between 24 and 35mm (full-frame), 15 and 22mm (APS-C) or 12 and 17mm (Micro four-thirds). Avoid placing your model’s head too close to the edge of the frame, especially the corners, where it may be distorted.

I made the portrait below (taken with an 18mm lens, APS-C) by moving in close to my friend while she played her guitar.


Environmental Portrait

With wide angle lenses you need to get physically close to take photos where your model fills a large part of the frame. This requires a good relationship with your model. Once she trust you she will let you get close enough to use a wide angle lens. Getting close creates a sense of intimacy and involvement in the scene that isn’t present with longer focal lengths and is usually worth the effort.


About the Author:
Andrew S Gibson is a professional photographer based in New Zealand. He has taken photographs in 60 countries now as a Technical Editor for EOS magazine. He produced a 
Mastering Lenses guide for photographers.

Here are some more great photos taken with a wide angle lens:

Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Pexels.com
Photo by Brandon Montrone on Pexels.com