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PHOTOS OF THE WEEK FOR NOVEMBER 21ST, 2019

There are great photographers all over the world. Some get recognition, and some do not. I want to publish here a collection of “Photos of the Week” as selected by msn.com, but want to be selective of the ones I select as to not be political in any way. But, these photos are amazing, and some that I think you will truly enjoy:
Guadalajara, Mexico
Members of the public visit the Calaverandia theme park, installed on the occasion of the Day of the Dead celebrations, on Oct. 22.
Photo by: Fransisco Guasco / EPA-EFE / Shutterstock


International Space Station
Astronauts Andrew Morgan with Christina Koch (L) and Jessica Meir at the International Space Station on Oct. 18. The world’s first female spacewalking team made history by floating out of the International Space Station to fix a broken part of the power network. 
Photo courtesy of NASA


Bangalore, India
A dog belonging to the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) dog squad jumps over containers during an obstacle race to demonstrate its combat skills on Oct. 21.
Photo by: Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images


Lokken, Denmark
People look on as the lighthouse in Rubjerg Knude is being moved away from the coastline on Oct. 22. The 120-year-old lighthouse has been put on wheels and rails to move it away from the North Sea, which has been eroding the coast.
Photo by: Hans Ravn/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images


York, England
The interior of York Minster is lit up in a dramatic display during a media call for the “Northern Lights” sound and light installation on Oct. 23.
Photo by: Ian Forsyth/Getty Images


Durban, South Africa
A group of dancers from the Kumari Shiksha’s Dance Institution light colorful clay lamps to celebrate the festival of Diwali, on Oct. 19.
Photo by: Rajesh Jantilal/AFP via Getty Images


Hitachinaka, Japan
A woman takes a selfie in a field of Kochia (Bassia scoparia), a kind of tumbleweed, at the Hitachi Seaside Park on Oct. 21.
Photo by: Toru Hanai/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock


Al-Darbasiyah, Syria
Syrian Kurdish and Arab families are pictured fleeing the town of Al-Darbasiyah, on the border between Syria and Turkey, and moving toward Al-Hasakah on Oct. 22.
Photo by: Delil Souleiman/AFP via Getty Images


Sydney, Australia
A person walks past a sculpture titled “Celest” by Australian artist David Ball during the launch of Sculpture by the Sea exhibition at Tamarama Beach on Oct. 24.
Photo by: David Gray/Getty Images


Ganaur, India
People queue up to cast their votes at a polling station in the Indian state of Haryana on Oct. 21.
Photo taken by: Prakash Singh/AFP via Getty Images


Washington, DC, US
A double rainbow is seen over the White House on Oct. 22.
Photo taken by:  Alex Brandon/AP Photo


New Taipei City, Taiwan
Local Buddhists release a sky lantern in front of the Pingxi train station on Oct. 21.
Photo taken by: Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images


Barcelona, Spain
Mime artists relax on a park bench during lunchtime at the Catalonia Square on Oct. 23.
Photo taken by: Ben Curtis/AP Photo


Guilin, China
Spanish cyclist Enric Mas Nicolau (C) celebrates after the sixth stage of the Tour of Guangxi on Oct. 22.
Photo taken by: Tim de Waele/Getty Images


Nice, France
People look at a thunderstorm above the Mediterranean Sea on Oct. 23
Photo taken by: Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images


Singapore
A prototype of the Volocopter air taxi is seen during a test flight over Marina Bay on Oct. 22.
Photo taken by: Ore Huiying/Getty Images


Inzai, Japan
(L to R) Golfer Rory McIlroy, former rugby players Brian O’Driscoll and Mike Tindall, and Tiger Woods watch the tee shot hit by former rugby player Bryan Habana during the Challenge: Japan Skins golf event on Oct. 21.
Photo taken by: Richard Heathcote/Getty Images
Beijing, China
A woman uses her mobile phone while riding her bike on Oct. 21.
Photo taken by: Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images


Paris, France
Visitors look at a painting titled “Salvator Mundi” at the Louvre Museum on Oct. 22.
Photo taken by: Chesnot/Getty Images


Belfast, Northern Ireland
A young boy dressed in a skeleton costume picks a pumpkin at Streamvale Open Farm on Oct. 22.
Photo taken by: Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images


Budapest, Hungary
A picture taken from a drone shows the temporary race course set up on the perimeter of Heroes’ Square during the National Gallop Hussar-themed equestrian festival on Oct. 20.
Photo by: Balazs Mohai/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock


Fife, Scotland
Hundreds of students take part in the traditional Raisin Monday foam fight at the University of St. Andrews on Oct. 22.
Photo by: Jane Barlow/PA Archive/PA Images


Dublin, Ireland
People take a walk along with their dog around Glen pond in Phoenix Park on Oct. 18.
Photo by: Brian Lawless/PA Wire/PA Images


Dortmund, Germany
A goose swims on a lake in a park on Oct. 23.
Photo taken by:  Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images


This special selection of photos this week was presented by MSN.COM. A special thanks to them for the use of their photos and the photographers around the world for these amazing pictures.

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REASONS WHY PHOTOGRAPHERS MISS GREAT PHOTOS

I AM GUESSING ALMOST EVERY PHOTOGRAPHER, AT LEAST SOME POINT IN THEIR PHOTOGRAPHIC CAREER, IS KICKING THEMSELVES BECAUSE THEY DID NOT HAVE THEIR CAMERA READY WHEN SOME INCREDIBLE SHOT HAPPENED RIGHT IN FRONT OF THEM, AND THEY MISSED IT !  AM I RIGHT?  I THINK EVERY ONE DOES THAT AND THEY LEARN QUICKLY HOW TO GET TO THE POINT WHERE THEY DON’T MISS SO MANY OF THOSE AGAIN.

LET’S LOOK AT WHAT WE NEED TO DO SO WE DON’T MISS THOSE, AND ALSO LOOK AT THE REASONS WHY WE MISS THOSE.

“Brands Hatch” captured by PictureSocial member jim wood

1- IF YOU ARE GOING TO HAVE YOUR CAMERA IN A CAMERA BAG, MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR BAG READY FOR EASY AND QUICK ACCESS.  WAIT, YOU SAY!  I DON’T WANT PEOPLE STEALING FROM ME.  WELL, GET OUT OF THAT CROWD, AND GET WHERE YOU CAN GRAB YOUR CAMERA QUICKLY IF YOU NEED TO TAKE A QUICK PHOTO.  HAVE IT UNSNAPPED, UNZIPPED, UNCLICKED, OR WHATEVER, BUT, HAVE IT READY TO OPEN AND READY TO GRAB.
2-  MAKE SURE YOU HAVE AN EXTRA BATTERY ON HAND. HAVE IT FULLY CHARGED AND READY TO GO IN CASE YOUR

OTHER BATTERY IN YOUR CAMERA NOW GOESOUT ON YOU.  A GOOD PHOTOGRAPHER ALWAYSHAS MORE THAN ONE BATTERY ON HAND.

3- DIRT ON LENSES DOES NOT MAKE FOR A PRETTY PICTURE

SO YOU HAVE THE CHANCE TO GET THE PERFECT PHOTO, AND YOU GRAB YOUR CAMERA AND TAKE THE PHOTO, ONLY TO FIND OUT YOUR LENS WAS DIRTY.  MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR LENS CLEAN ALWAYS.  CHECK IT REGULARLY.  AND YOU KNOW WHICH CAMERA IS THE WORSE FOR THIS PROBLEM?  YOUR CELLPHONE.  WHY, BECAUSE YOU ARE ALWAYS GRABBING IT, FOR MANY REASONS OTHER THAN A CAMERA.  SO, YOU GRAB IT FOR TEXTING, FOR MAKING A PHONE CALL, FOR READING YOUR EMAIL, THEN SOMETHING COMES ALONG THAT WOULD MAKE AN INCREDIBLE PHOTO, AND YOU DON’T LOOK THROUGH THE LENS, SO YOU DON’T SEE IT UNTIL THAT AMAZING PHOTO OPPORTUNITY IS GONE, ONLY TO FIND OUT THAT YOU HAVE THIS BIG SLIMY FINGERPRINT ON YOUR CELL PHONE CAMERA LENS.  RUINED PHOTO.

4- HERE IS ANOTHER ONE THAT MOST PEOPLE JUST DONT THINK OF: MEMORY CARDS

OH THIS COMES UP ON YOU OUT OF NOWHERE.  NO WARNING,  AND IT HITS YOU ONLY WHEN IT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PHOTO OF YOUR LIFE.  HOW MANY PHOTOS CAN YOUR CELL PHONE HANDLE?  HOW MANY PHOTOS DOES THE CARD HOLD IN YOUR CAMERA?  DO YOU EVEN KNOW?  HOW ABOUT YOU BUT SOME EXTRAS AND BRING THEM ALONG TOO?  THESE ARE ABOUT AS IMORTANT AS BRINGING AN EXTRA BATTERY.  REALLY !

5- Where are your camera settings at?

THIS ONE IS A KILLER TOO, ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE A CAMERA THAT HAS SETTINGS.  IF YOU HAD TO GRAB YOUR CAMERA, IS IT ALREADY PRESET FOR WHAT YOU ARE ABOUT TO TAKE A PHOTO OF?  OR ARE YOU GOING TO GET:


CAMERA SETTING WRONG:  OVEREXPOSED PHOTO.  YUK

A TERRIBLE OVEREXPOSED PHOTO OR UNDEREXPOSED PHOTO.  HAVE YOUR CAMERA SETTING READY FOR YOUR SHOT, JUST IN CASE.  THE PROGRAM MODE, THE AUTOMATIC MODE, MAY BE THE BEST ALL AROUND ONE FOR IMMEDIATE LUCK.  AND MAYBE YOU CAN MAKE ADJUSTMENTS AS YOU TAKE THE PHOTO, IF YOU HAVE THE TIME.

6- Lens cap on, or lens filter on:

 I WILL ADMIT MORE THAN ONCE, AS I GO TO GET THAT PERFECT SHOT, THAT I HAVE HAD MY LENS CAP ON OR

OOPS !  My lens cap is on.

Or even a filter than you used last time.  Make sure you check the front of your lens for something that could block or alter the image.

So, hopefully those are the things to be aware of as you practice and prepare for the most amazing photos that you could take.  
One last thing:  I have a photographer friend who is a professional wildlife photographer.  Wildlife photography is truly an art.  And you have to be ready at the spur of the moment to be able to grab the right camera, with the right lens at the right time to get the right photo.  I have a photo of him as he goes out to take photos in the wild.  Look at him and his equipment, and notice how he has several cameras equipped with a different lens and how he has them all ready to grab at any time he wants to get the shot he wants.  You want to become a professional wildlife photographer?  Yeah, this is what you need to become:

For more of the work that this photographer does, go to his website:
http://www.robswildlife.com/


He is truly an amazing artist, and you will love his work.  Check it out.

So, the moral of this blog is, if you want to be a good photographer, you have to be ready to take a photo, immediately. Have your camera ready in some mode, probably automatic mode, so that you can capture the thing that you want, without having to miss it. Good luck.

OVER 1000 BLOGS
Photo by Zukiman Mohamad on Pexels.com

LIGHT JUST DOESN’T GET ANY BETTER THAN ON OVERCAST DAYS:

Lighting is everything in photography, but some “poor” conditions may surprise you. Am I alone here? Does anybody else get excited about photographing on overcast days?

I use to think I was a contrast junkie, but I discovered that my passion is for detail, more of an internal contrast issue than one of overall contrast. Internal contrast (the clear distinction between tones inside the extremes of white and black) is what delivers the distinctions we call detail.

Hot highlights and deep shadows :

When you consider the dynamic range of most digital camera image sensors, typical bright sunny days can present two challenges right off the bat: hot highlights and deep shadows. When the highlights in the original image are very hot, and the shadows are very deep, extracting detail in the “near shadows” and “near highlights” turns into an editing issue.

This is why photographing on overcast days is the easiest lighting condition to deal with.

The holy grail of photographic exposure range is located well within those bookend extremes. On a typical Florida day, with the Sun blaring on a scene, the trick is to keep the quarter, middle, and three-quarter tones ideally balanced in order to capture critical detail.

With highlights too “hot,” the inevitable shadows cast by the tropical Sun tends to push critical three-quarter tones (shadow detail) into the mud. Shooting in RAW mode allows most images to recover all but the most severe edges of dark and light, though it can take a careful adjustment to do so.

Filtering effect of clouds

When photographing on overcast days, the filtering effect of clouds mellows the Sun’s harsh light, revealing significant quarter tones (highlight detail).

The wonderful byproduct of this softer “diffused” light is softer shadows, which in turn deliver more shadow detail.

It is much easier to boost the highlights and deepen the shadows with a little help from overcast weather. On very sunny days, you might have to use a reflector or fill flash to open up the shadows, but on cloudy days, they’re already open! This natural diffuser renders rich colors and a full range of tones from the deepest shadows to the lightest highlights.

This lighting is the ideal time to press your 18% gray card into action.

Gray card

There is a reason why photographers like to balance their lighting around an 18% gray card. That 18% value just happens to be the same reflective value as average Caucasian skin color. And that value is the sweet spot of all photographic exposure.

Your camera’s image sensor is tuned to record skin tones in the very center of the contrast range. Image sensors do their best work when you point them at this reflective value. Once the camera knows this value, the lighter and darker tones fall quite naturally in line. And when the outdoor lighting falls neatly within the camera sensor’s “cruising range” (with headroom on either side of the scene’s histogram), that my friends, delivers top drawer results.

Photographing on overcast days may well become your favorite lighting.

Middle tone emphasis

Don’t be afraid to put the scene’s tones well within the middle of the histogram.

There is no hard, fast rule that says that every image has to contain extreme highlights or near-black shadows. Real-life simply doesn’t appear that way to your eyes. Not even high-key photography mandates that the lightest tones must be extremely bright. Some of the most moving photos are nearly void of overall contrast.

Don’t fall into the trap of “optimizing” every photo’s range so that it produces bright highlights and deep shadows. Allow nature to dictate the visual mood. Realistically speaking, the only thing in nature that is truly “black” is the inside of a cave at midnight. The only thing pure “white” is a direct view of the Sun at noon.

Auto levels

It’s okay to have highlights that aren’t pegged up against the right side of the histogram. Please think twice before you hit the dreaded Auto button in the Levels dialog of Photoshop. That kind of cookie-cutter photography should be left to those who don’t know any better. Let the scene set the mood and simply convey what you experienced.

Occasionally, dynamic adjustments within software applications tempt us to automatically force nature into conditions that aren’t natural.

White balance

The next time you find yourself in the shadow-free lighting of a clouded sky, go and get your camera. Great color (and fabulous black and white) photography is there for the taking. However, do keep in mind that outdoor shots under cloud cover will appear slightly bluish because those clouds are absorbing the shorter wavelengths.

Set your camera’s white balance to Overcast or Cloudy. This setting will compensate for the bluishness of the scene. If you are using a gray card and have the time to set a situational white balance, you can zero in on the color even more accurately.

Conclusion

Next time you shoot outdoors in overcast weather, search the scene for something interesting and unique, something that will bring a smile to your face. I’ve found that I find whatever I’m looking for in life, and that includes dismal weather. There is a bright spot in just about every situation if you keep your eyes (and your mind) open.

I hope this inspires you to look forward to photographing on overcast days. These special days deliver great natural lighting and provide many opportunities to see a different side of life.

Do you photograph on overcast days? What are your thoughts? Share with us in the comments!

Herb Paynter

Herb Paynter

is the owner of Imageprep Communications, a photographer, author, and print consultant suffering in sunny Ormond Beach Florida. He is an award-winning Photoshop plug-in software developer who has been teaching digital imaging and production image editing for more than 20 years.
THANKS TO HERB PAYNTER AND DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY SCHOOL FOR THIS ARTICLE.