TAKING PHOTOS IN THE BRIGHT SUN AT NOON ! PART 2

As promised yesterday in my blog, I have made this issue a 2 part series. Please read part 1 to catch up to some great ideas about how to shoot your photos at probably in the harshest light there is, and that is at noon! There are 2 items that were not mentioned yesterday, or only lightly touched on, that I wanted to bring out that will really help you in shooting pictures at noon.

WHEN TAKING SCENERY PHOTOS AT NOON, ALWAYS USE A CIRCULAR POLARIZING FILTER.
The polarizing filter will naturally enhance your colors.

Pop on a pair of (decent) sunglasses and not only are your eyes less strained, things just look better. The reason for this is likely the polarization effect. Colors may appear more saturated, bright blue skies can take on a deeper hue, and some pesky reflections just vanish. All of these can benefit certain photographs and make the circular polarizer filter one of the best—and most difficult—filters to use. 

Exactly What Does a Polarizer Do?

It’s both simple and difficult to understand what polarizing filters accomplish. Technically, per our expert product writers, a circular polarizer “helps to reduce reflections and glare by filtering out light that has become polarized due to reflection from a non-metallic surface.” Essentially, this means it cuts down on certain types of light in a way that can benefit your imagery. More specifically, it will reduce glare and reflections, including certain haze. In real-world applications this can help eliminate reflections on glass or water, reduce some reflected light on certain subjects, or improve overall contrast in a landscape.

You may have heard of linear polarizers, in addition to the now standard circular polarizer. In practice, both filters accomplish the same goal. However, circular polarizers have an extra quarter wave-plane element that helps convert the light back into a form that is suitable for modern autofocus and auto-exposure systems. Since this tech wasn’t around years ago, early filters were fine with linear polarization, but if you are shopping today, circular is the safe bet.

Basic Polarizer Tips

How exactly do you best make use of a polarizer? That can be incredibly easy or extremely technical, depending on how you want to approach it. If you pick one up, you will notice that the front part of the filter spins and then changes the appearance of the image on your camera. You could very easily just make the adjustments, preview in the camera, and then just pick a position that looks the best. Simple and effective.

Technically, there are some things to know. Among the most important is that polarizers work best when at a 90° angle from the sun. This means that you should practically never use a polarizer facing directly toward the sun. Another reason to take off the filter for shots that include the sun is that the extra glass can result in more flaring. So, your sunsets and sunrise photos will be better off without the filter.

The sun is directly ahead in this shot and you can see the relative ineffectiveness of the polarizer

Another thing to keep in mind is that polarization is not likely to have a uniform appearance across your entire image. This is especially true with wide-angle lenses. Getting a deeper blue out of a sky is a very common use for a polarizer, but if you are shooting with an ultra-wide lens you may see that the sky shifts quickly from normal to dark in an unnatural way. Be careful with the way you apply it and you shouldn’t have an issue. You have control over where and how much polarization will have an impact on your photo, so you should experiment.

While using the filter, you may notice that your camera’s meter is telling you to increase your exposure. That is because polarizers generally absorb some of the light entering the lens—it is part of their job. You can expect to lose between 1-3 stops of light, depending on the exact model and brand of filter you picked. It can result in some moments where a tripod might be advisable to get your exposure just right. It also means that polarizers are not going to be great filters for low-light situations.

A very deep blue transitions quickly to a normal sky in this image made with a wide-angle lens.

This article on polarizing filters was written by: Shawn C. Steiner for Explora.

THE OTHER TIP YOU SHOULD UNDERSTAND IS: WHEN YOU TAKE PORTRAITS AT NOON TIME, TAKE THE PORTRAITS IN THE SHADE.

There are several reasons for taking portraits in the shade at noon time:

1- The light is so strong you will find the people squinting as you take the photos. That is such an uncommon look for people, it would be good if that was not the mode of a portrait.

Even with a hat on this person is squinting because of the harsh light. Find some shade to take your portraits at noon.

2- The second reason you should find shade at noon to take portraits is the shadows and lighting is so harsh, see how nice it is when there are no shadows:

See how beautiful this portrait is without shadows.

With that, this should complete our post on how to take photos at noon. Look at the blog from yesterday, and then today, and you have everything you need to take photos all through the summer.

Other great photos taken in the shade:

A PEXEL PHOTO TAKEN BY ANDREA PIACQUADIO



A PEXEL PHOTO BY WESNER RODGRIGUEZ



Published by 123photogo

I have been a photographer for many years. Worked in retail selling cameras and accessories for over 20 years. Taught many photo classes, and have even been a judge in several county fairs. Now, I want to share photo instructions and entertainment with all other photographers around the world.

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