PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: More incredible photos from BING!

We all know that Bing is one of the bigger Search engines on your computer. Anyone can sign up for Bing as their search engine. But, one thing that is amazine about Bing, is that every day when you start up your computer, they have an amazing winning photo on your computer screen. And you can subscribe to a daily treat of these photos.

With that being said, here are some photos done lately from Bing:

These polar bears seem to be just as happy as we are to visit Torngat Mountains National Park today. Located in Canada at the tip of the Labrador Peninsula and bordering the Labrador Sea, the park is accessible only by boat, charter plane, or helicopter. The name “Torngat” comes from the Inuktitut word “Tongait,” meaning “place of spirits.” The Inuit have lived here for centuries and still fish and hunt across the wide tundra valleys where these polar bears roam. This time of year, polar bears are waiting for the sea ice to form so they can venture out onto the Labrador Sea to hunt for seals.
Framed here for the season by fall foliage, the Cambron Covered Bridge is located along a nature trail in Madison County, Alabama—not Iowa, which is the setting of the bestselling romance novel “The Bridges of Madison County.” It”s believed there were once about 14,000 covered bridges in the US, but fewer than 900 or so remain today, a quarter of which can be found in Pennsylvania. But Alabama has covered-bridge bragging rights, too. The state has 11 historic covered bridges. Built in 1974, the Cambron Covered Bridge doesn”t make the official “historic” list, but it does offer hikers a peaceful passageway with great views of Sky Lake.
Spying the crooked silhouette of Corfe Castle above the rolling, foggy hills of Dorset, England, you might not guess at the ruin”s former palatial beauty—you”ll more likely sense its long history of intrigue, and maybe feel a chill down your spine.
If you”re greeted by a friendly face and a warm “Welcome to Bents” as you stroll up to this old general store, you might be having a paranormal experience: It”s been 50 years since a living soul dwelt in this Saskatchewan ghost town.
After the nesting and breeding seasons of spring and summer have passed, starlings become highly social birds, often gathering in flocks that number in the thousands. These flocks sometimes take the form of a murmuration—when the birds form a group large and dense enough that they appear to move together as a single organism, even if the movements seem arbitrary. Though scientists still don”t quite understand how the individual starlings in a murmuration coordinate their tight, fluid formations, the behavior is thought to be a way to confuse predators.
If it appears to be slinking away from the camera, maybe this chameleon is all too aware of the way some of us humanfolk see reptiles: as frightening at best, disgusting at worst. We know you die-hard reptile lovers are out there too, but it”s undeniable that reptiles” reputation among people has suffered thanks to popular villainous depictions—from “Anaconda” and “Godzilla” to the serpent encountered by Adam and Eve. Even our everyday language throws shade on this vast class of critters: When”s the last time you called someone “reptile” and meant it nicely?
A photographer happened to catch these brown bear cubs in the act of stealing a boat. Patiently, he watched from afar, snapping photo after photo. Realizing what the cubs were doing, he knew he should document this event. Intent on getting the boat into the water, the cubs worked like they’d done this before. Lighting out onto the lake, the bears seemed to enjoy the ride.
We’re celebrating International Dark-Sky Week with an image from a corner of New Mexico that’s one of the best places to stargaze in the continental United States. Dark-Sky Week is observed during the first new moon of April, when stars shine more brightly because the moon isn’t visible. The event was created to bring attention to the harmful effects of artificial light on the natural world, and to remind us of the beauty of an unadulterated night sky. Light pollution not only impacts our ability to see the stars and to sleep soundly, but also creates challenges for many nocturnal species, migrating birds, and even baby sea turtles. So, turn out those lights, look up, and be amazed at the sky that your great-great-grandparents saw.
This mountain hare is starting the year off right. It”s used to cold weather and high altitudes—and, since it”s nocturnal, it”s perfectly comfortable sleeping through an afternoon snowstorm in northeast Scotland. On New Year”s Day, humans in the US are more likely to be found in their natural habitat, the couch, dozing off or perhaps watching one of the college football bowl games on TV. Some more ambitious folks might be getting a jump on their New Year”s resolutions and exercising. First Day Hikes are part of an initiative led by state parks, with hundreds of free guided hikes offered in all 50 states. That sounds great, but maybe a little later. Right now, we think the hare has the right idea.
A mother sperm whale surfaces in the North Atlantic as her young albino calf swims beside her. It”s an especially photogenic moment for these underwater powerhouses, which spend much of their time in the dim depths over 1,000 feet below the waves. You”re meeting them to commemorate the day in 1841 when a young Herman Melville set out from New Bedford, Massachusetts, on a whaling voyage to the South Pacific that would help inspire his masterwork “Moby-Dick.” Today at the New Bedford Whaling Museum, Melville fans will begin a marathon public reading of the novel—an annual event that lasts a leviathan 25 hours.
Burrowing parrots, sometimes called burrowing parakeets, are native to the arid Monte Desert of western Argentina. The birds use their beaks and talons to hollow out nesting spaces in soft limestone cliffs found in the foothills of the Andes Mountains. The parrots sometimes end up captured and sold as pets for the wild bird trade. While that”s not illegal—burrowing parrots aren”t endangered—the capture and sale of these birds and others is part of the focus of National Bird Day in the United States, which is observed on January 5. National Bird Day was created to educate the public about the value of wild birds remaining wild. While keeping a parrot as a pet may seem like fun, the organizers of National Bird Day claim the parrot is going to be healthier and happier in its natural habitat.
If you want to celebrate Take the Stairs Day in style, look no further than China”s Tianmen Mountain (literally Heaven”s Door). About 5,000 feet above sea level, the hole in the mountain is the highest naturally formed arch in the world. Originally a cave, it became an arch in 263 CE when the back side of the mountain collapsed, creating the dramatic opening we see today. You”ll have to climb 999 steps to make it to the top, but we promise the view is worth it.
If you want to celebrate Take the Stairs Day in style, look no further than China”s Tianmen Mountain (literally Heaven”s Door). About 5,000 feet above sea level, the hole in the mountain is the highest naturally formed arch in the world. Originally a cave, it became an arch in 263 CE when the back side of the mountain collapsed, creating the dramatic opening we see today. You”ll have to climb 999 steps to make it to the top, but we promise the view is worth it.
Welcome to the snowy Bavarian Alps, where the mountain called the Zugspitze (TSOOG-shpit-seh) casts a cold shadow over the Eibsee, a small and serene alpine lake. Situated on the border with Austria, the peak is Germany”s highest point at almost 10,000 feet above sea level, towering over the lakeside village of Grainau.
Today we”re featuring a picture-postcard view of Val Gardena, a valley nestled in the Dolomites in the South Tyrol region of Italy. This time of year, the remote area may be a bit busier than usual as skiers are drawn to its famous slopes. In summer, it”s known for other outdoor activities, such as rock climbing and hiking. Since the 17th century, the villagers have been famed for their wood carving. Artisans create everything from simple, utilitarian items, like bowls, to finely detailed figurines. One of the woodcarvers” biggest hits? A wooden peg doll that was popular across Europe and the US during the 19th century.
At a quick glance, you might mistake these dunes for massive snowdrifts. Although they do make for great sledding, the tiny crystals that form the dunes at White Sands National Park are not snow or ice but gypsum, a soft mineral often used to make plaster and chalk. The dune field became a national monument on this day in 1933 with a proclamation by President Herbert Hoover, which set aside nearly 150,000 acres for preservation. Recently, on December 20, 2019, President Trump signed legislation making it the 62nd designated national park in the National Park System.
January 21 is Squirrel Appreciation Day. Really. It was established by Christy Hargrove, a wildlife rehabilitator from North Carolina, to draw attention to the importance of these remarkably widespread creatures. Native to five continents and currently living on six (there”s no Antarctic squirrel), there are about 285 species of squirrels in the world, ranging from the tiny African pygmy squirrel to the Bhutan giant flying squirrel (when in Bhutan, be ready to duck).
This time of year, from late January to early March, babies arrive on the Serengeti. At the height of the wildebeest calving season, thousands of calves are born every day. Moments after birth, these youngsters can walk, and in just a few days, they”ll be able to run fast enough to keep up with the herd. That”s a good thing. Calving season isn”t just a draw for safari tourists wanting a front row seat at the start of the circle of life, but also for predators like lions, cheetahs, and hyenas on the hunt for easy prey.
This is the sun-soaked ice cap of Iceland”s Eyjafjallajökull. Remember the name? It”s that unpronounceable volcano that made you miss your connecting flight back in 2010. That eruption and the vast ash cloud it belched over the North Atlantic was the biggest disruption to air traffic since World War II. And this relatively small but volatile island may yet waylay the world again: Eyjafjallajökull is a lightweight among the 32 active volcanic systems dotting the Land of Fire and Ice—its much larger neighbor Katla has been closely monitored since the 2010 incident.
For India”s 70th Republic Day, we”re featuring an uncommon view of the Taj Mahal in Agra. It”s on this day that India celebrates its official beginning as an independent democratic republic after having endured nearly a century of British rule. Republic Day events include presentations of the Padma Awards (national service honors), a Republic Day parade in New Delhi, and other ceremonies.
Russia”s Lake Baikal is a record-holding wonder: It”s the world”s oldest (25 million years), deepest (over 5,000 feet in some parts), and largest freshwater lake (more than 20 percent of the Earth”s fresh surface water by volume). Baikal lies in the deepest continental rift on Earth, and because the rift is geologically active, the tectonic plates continue to move farther apart.

Hope you enjoyed this collection of photos. See you next week for more amazing photos!

Published by 123photogo

I have been a photographer for many years. Worked in retail selling cameras and accessories for over 20 years. Taught many photo classes, and have even been a judge in several county fairs. Now, I want to share photo instructions and entertainment with all other photographers around the world.

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