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LONG LIVE “DSLR”

Image credit: Ricoh Imaging

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Thinking of mirrorless or DSLR?

I try to keep up with this interesting war. The camera manufactures trying to decide if everyone wants a Mirrorless Camera, or a DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex). People who have used the DSLR and jumped to Mirrorless cameras, often are not excited with the results. The biggest difference between the two versions can be huge. And that is apparently what people are finding out.

The one thing that bothers me the most about Mirrorless cameras is that all manufactures are going with smaller format sensors. There is the APS-C format, the Micro 2/3, and there are several others. All using smaller sensors, so they can make the camera even smaller. But why did people switch to the DSLR in the first place? They had been shooting their cell phone or even worse, their pocket 110 film camera. Everyone was shocked when they started using 35mm film and the difference in quality. And when everything went digital, that was great. You still had the “flop-up” mirror like you have with a DSLR, but you had big sensors. And the image was great.

20X30 Prints from 16MP Sensor was amazing.

I worked for Pentax for just 5 weeks during Christmas many years ago, back when digital SLR’s were coming on strong. At that time, the photo store I was working at had some enlargements done from a Digital SLR that had 16MP Sensors in them. And they had enlarged from that format a beautiful 30X40 Print, and a 20X30 print. I was shocked! It appeared to be as good as film. That made the choice easy to go to digital format because someone has some “proof in the pudding”. Great, sharp photos from the new DSLR cameras. Every manufacture was getting involved at the time. So it was fun to see the changes between the different brands.

apartment architecture bookcase bookshelves
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Would you love to see one of your photos on the wall? Then check out what it would take to do so. Would you get better photography business if you had people see your work? Then why pick a camera with a smaller sensor. Sure they are good. But I was just reading in a photo magazine where they were testing the new C**** model, and this is an interesting comment he made:

It’s really quite impressive what C**** has been able to do with its latest, affordable enthusiast mirrorless – it does everything it says on the tin, and does it well. On seeing the results after getting back home, however, I realized an APS-C camera wasn’t for me, at least not when I’m trying to shoot wildlife.

— Norton Juster

I am looking at the Pentax camera once again, because they are committed to the DSLR format. And their specs, to me, make me think that they have got something really, really exciting. Look at this again:

Plus, this from one other company that does camera testing:

The new sensor, alongside the improved processing algorithms and accelerator unit, make this a mighty camera. It is able to deliver excellent image quality in most scenarios. Its RAW capabilities are among the best available, with a large dynamic range and high level of resolution. Color accuracy, especially in RAW, is stellar.

Quote from “Pentax Forums”

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