About 123photogo

I have been a photographer for many years. Worked in retail selling cameras and accessories for over 20 years. Taught many photo classes, and have even been a judge in several county fairs. Now, I want to share photo instructions and entertainment with all other photographers around the world.

NEVER MISS A GREAT PHOTO AGAIN:

amphibian animal close up color
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I AM GUESSING ALMOST EVERY PHOTOGRAPHER, AT LEAST SOME POINT IN THEIR PHOTOGRAPHIC CAREER, IS KICKING THEMSELVES BECAUSE THEY DID NOT HAVE THEIR CAMERA READY WHEN SOME INCREDIBLE SHOT HAPPENED RIGHT IN FRONT OF THEM, AND THEY MISSED IT !  AM I RIGHT?  I THINK EVERY ONE DOES THAT AND THEY LEARN QUICKLY HOW TO GET TO THE POINT WHERE THEY DON’T MISS SO MANY OF THOSE AGAIN.

LET’S LEARN SOME STEPS SO THAT DOESN’T HAPPEN:

firefighter extinguishing a burning car
Photo by David Henry on Pexels.com

1- Have your camera bag ready to get the camera out quickly:

If you have your camera in a camera bag, then make sure it is ready for a quick grab. Have it ready with automatic exposure settings, and lens caps off, etc. If you are in a crowd, make sure you keep track of your camera by having the top lid closed. I would suggest to get out of the crowd for security reasons. Crowds are when you most likely will have your camera stolen.

2- Always have an extra battery on hand:

I have never seen a good photographer without an extra battery. You know your battery will go dead when you are taking a photo of something you want. It will be the million dollar photo if you miss it because of a dead battery. Just get one.

3- Avoid the dirty lens

One of the biggest challenges we all face when using our cameras is to make sure our lenses are perfectly clean. Every speck of dust or dirt will cause your photo to look blurry, distorted or even “down right nasty”. So, check your lenses often to make sure you have the best chance for a good photo..

4- Memory cards: Always have some on hand!

Whether you have a cell phone, or a regular camera, they all have their limitations. Granted, it is better than the old film days, when you 12, 24, or 36 exposures. But that camera kept track of it better than your digital system. You just never know when you run out of memory.

Never go without having an extra card for memory. I always try to have a “few” in my bag.

5- IS YOUR EXPOSURE SETTING READY TO TAKE A PHOTO?

An overexposed forest

If you want to capture a photo fast, the best thing to do is to have everything on automatic. If you want to be the one to take a photo in manual setting, make sure you have the time to get that right. Also, there is shutter speed priority, or aperture priority mode that will help you out if you are trying to get a special effect.

6- Watch out for lens caps, or filters that may be on your lens

Oops, my lens cap is on.

How many seconds do you lose when you find out your lens cap is still on, or a filter you had on it from a previous shot? This has always been a killer for most photographers.

ONE LAST IDEA:

One last thing:  I have a photographer friend who is a professional wildlife photographer.  Wildlife photography is truly an art.  And you have to be ready at the spur of the moment to be able to grab the right camera, with the right lens at the right time to get the right photo.  I have a photo of him as he goes out to take photos in the wild.  Look at him and his equipment, and notice how he has several cameras equipped with a different lens and how he has them all ready to grab at any time he wants to get the shot he wants.  You want to become a professional wildlife photographer?  Yeah, this is what you need to become:

I love to see a true professional photographer at work. It always reminds of what it will really take to be a great photographer.

To see some of the photos that Rob has taken as a wildlife photographer, go to: ROBS WILDLIFE .

DON’T FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER. SPECIAL PROMOTIONS OR PRODUCTS ARE AVAILABLE WITH THE NEWSLETTER. SIGN UP BELOW:

An email list is the best way to get the detailed new, the latest news, plus special offers on products and even coupons to get free access to sites, and information, and products.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: 123PhotoGo, 1793 E Juniper St, Layton, UT, 84040, http://www.123photogo.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

USE YOUR DSLR AS A “WEBCAM”:

woman in white long sleeve shirt vlogging
Photo by Alena Darmel on Pexels.com

You might be wondering why you’d use a DSLR camera in place of your webcam. The answer is simple enough. You’ll likely have a better lens and capture quality on that camera than any standard webcam you can purchase.  

An HDMI capture card like the Cam Link 4K also allows you to make the most of your camera’s video capabilities. Where most webcams can only manage 720p, the Cam Link allows up to 4K at 30FPS. So with the right lighting, your video will be much more professional, crisp and satisfying too. 

Use your DSLR or mirrorless camera as your webcam, and change the quality of your videos by a huge margin.

WHY WOULD I WANT TO MAKE THAT CHANGE?

A DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera provides a more accurate view of what you’re photographing, as the viewfinder displays exactly what is in front of the lens. DSLRs have been used for years – since replacing traditional SLR cameras – for professional photography. While they’re slowly succumbing to the march of technology and the new generation of mirrorless cameras, for many the DSLR is the perfect marriage of old school photography and the digital era.

A webcam, in contrast, is more compact, with a small lens, smaller CMOS sensor, and lower resolution. They’re optimized for sending data through wires rather than direct to a memory card, which means that webcams are more efficient, but the result can be, you guessed it, pixelated.

DSLR cameras can replace webcams for streaming video over Zoom, Skype, or whatever video conferencing software you’re using. If you’ve ever watched live streams on YouTube with stunning picture quality, the chances are the streamer was using a DSLR.

WHAT YOU WILL NEED TO START USING YOUR DSLR AS A WEBCAM:

To use your DSLR camera as a webcam, ensure you have:

  • A tripod that suits your camera.
  • A high-capacity battery or mains power solution. Mains power supplies for DSLRs typically feature a dummy battery that slips into the battery compartment. This then connects to an adapter to power the camera.
  • The micro-USB cable that shipped with your camera, or a mini-HDMI cable.
  • Optional: LED ring or other lighting, microphone.

Ensure you have these items and have them connected or set up before proceeding.

Another reason to use your DSLR camera or mirrorless camera today, is the resolution is now so much higher than ever. Panasonic Lumix cameras and Nikon, Canon, Fuji Film, are now primed to shoot their video in 6K or even 8K!!! Yeah, you want super good quality, you should consider these cameras for your WEBCAM work. Get in to the higher quality images and see what will be the difference to your viewers who will notice you are a serious “videographer” now.

IS WEBCAM FUNCTION AVAILABLE ON DSLR CAMERAS?

Some digital cameras include a webcam function, and this includes some DSLRs.

So, before proceeding, check the driver disc that shipped with your camera, along with the menus on the device. If there is a webcam setting you can use, you’re free to proceed with connecting the device to your computer, webcam mode enabled. The camera should then be detected as a standard USB webcam, ready to be used with your video chat software. Note that if this is an option for you, the resolution will be lower than usual, limited by the constraints of the USB cable.

Make sure you keep up to date with technology like this by subscribing to our newsletter. We cover everything. Sign up and stay in the “know”.

An email list is the best way to get the detailed new, the latest news, plus special offers on products and even coupons to get free access to sites, and information, and products.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: 123PhotoGo, http://www.123photogo.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

LEARN HOW TO BECOME A GOOD “SMART PHONE PHOTOGRAPHER”:

person in yellow jacket taking photo of white clouds
Photo by Thirdman on Pexels.com

There are many different ways to take photos today. You could have the DSLR camera, a Video camera (a Videographer), and then of course you would have your smartphone or cell phone.

Your smartphone can take really good photos, and the phone companies keep improving the camera part of your phone every year. So, yes, you can take amazing photos with your smart phone. I am one who may forget to take my DSLR camera with me, but I always have my smart phone. Let’s learn some tips on how to use your smart phone to take amazing photos.

KEEP YOUR PHOTOS SIMPLE:

Do not over complicate things by having too much going on in the background. Simplicity is key. Keep things simple. Watch out for distracting objects on the camera screen. You will be surprised by how sophisticated your photos will turn out in the end.

person standing on rock formation cliff
Photo by Martin Péchy on Pexels.com

HAVE A THEME:

You often hear people saying, “A picture speaks a thousand words.” Every picture tells a story. What does your picture say? If you can learn to tell a story with your photos, then you will have much better photos. Think of how this photo that I am about to take will fit in a story book. Check out this blog for more information about “stories”: CLICK HERE

SHOOT FROM A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE:

architecture bridge building city
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Shoot the same thing a few times! Try to shoot from different angles; it gives you different perspectives. Be creative! Try different compositions. Shoot both horizontally and vertically. When you go back and review the photos you took, you will be amazed by how different shots give people different opinions and emotions. One of your pictures of the same object, shot from a different angle, may be that award-winning photograph. Let your creativity take flight! For more information about perspective, or how to shoot angles: CLICK HERE

DO NOT USE THE DIGITAL ZOOM

Only use optical zoom, no digital zoom. Zooming in beyond the smartphone’s optical range will produce grainy and pixelated pictures—chances are, pictures produced this way will be shaky and low quality. So, if you want to take a close-up shot of the object, my recommendation is that you move closer to the object (zoom with your feet) and click. Finally, you will start seeing smart phones coming out with “optical zoom” rather than digital zoom. So, next time you purchase a smartphone, and want good sharp pictures, find one that has an “optical zoom” instead of a digital zoom.

SHARE YOUR PHOTOS:

Where is the best place to share photos: INSTAGRAM is one of the better places that photos are shared. It amazes me some of the great photos you see on INSTAGRAM. 123Photogo has it’s own website for those who want to share their photos. We welcome all types of photographers. Here is how to share your photos with our readers:

FIND A WAY TO EDIT YOUR PHOTOS

Am I asking you to edit your photos so that they look different? Edit the temperature, the brightness and contrast, blur the background to make your objects stand out—these are some of the many things you can do. And part of the magic of smart phone photography is that a “shot gone wrong” can be transformed into something extraordinary. You can transform it into something artistic just by playing with the buttons in the app.

A FEW OF MY OWN CELL PHONE PHOTOS:

Knowing the strengths of your smart phone will let you take photos you couldn’t normally take with a DSLR. This photo is taken at night time, and the photo has already won awards for the amazing quality of the photo. True, I used a little editing and took out the orange color that street lights produce, but, it only makes it more pleasing. Plus, I could hand-hold the camera and it produced a photo that I would have had to use a tripod to take this photo with my DSLR. Taken with a Samsung S20ultra plus Note
Just being in the right place at the right time. Boats parked off the water during winter at Bear Lake, Utah. And the weather made it look even better.

NOTE: SIGN UP NOW TO GET OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER. FREE ITEMS AVAILABLE ONLY FOR NEWSLETTER READERS. I AM WORKING ON JUNE’S NEWSLETTER NOW, SO SIGN UP NOW!

An email list is the best way to get the detailed new, the latest news, plus special offers on products and even coupons to get free access to sites, and information, and products.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: 123PhotoGo, http://www.123photogo.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

YOU ARE NEVER TOO OLD TO TAKE UP PHOTOGRAPHY!

Photo by James Lewis on Unsplash

I call it: you are never too old to fulfill your dreams. Have you ever thought that maybe there should be an age limit to people taking photos? No, doesn’t seem like that should be. And since the pandemic, more older people are getting involved in photography.

AN OLDER PERSON CAN DO MANY GREAT THINGS!

 For many, it can be difficult sometimes to avoid thinking about what might have been if only you’d picked something up earlier in life or spent more time practicing it in the first place. Heck, some people seem to think that once you start down a particular path or surpass the age of 25 (four if you want to be a classically trained musician…) there’s little point in trying something new. But that’s an outdated way of thinking. 

Photo by James Coleman on Unsplash

We’re always hearing from readers who have taken up photography later in life or professionals who ditched their stable nine-to-five in pursuit of their photography business dream. Hobbies were on the rise during lockdown and more adults are willing to take a chance and set off down the road less travelled than ever before. 

An email list is the best way to get the detailed new, the latest news, plus special offers on products and even coupons to get free access to sites, and information, and products.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: 123PhotoGo, http://www.123photogo.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

OTHER FAMOUS PEOPLE WHO STARTED LATE IN LIFE:

Photography isn’t the only creative discipline where late bloomers have confidently stamped their mark. It’s well known that post-impressionist painter Paul Cézanne didn’t create his best works until later in life and literature is rife with famous authors who delayed starting their career. American author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, of Little House on the Prairie fame, was well into her 60s when her first book was published.

There are famous actors too:

Plenty of famous actors are late bloomers too. If Samuel L. Jackson had given up on his then-unremarkable acting career before his mid-40s, he’d have never starred as the unforgettable Jules Winnfield in Pulp Fiction and subsequently become one of the hardest-working and in-demand actors in Hollywood. 

REGARDLESS OF AGE, JUST GET GOING:

So, the next time you find yourself questioning whether it’s too late to try something new – photography or otherwise – grab the bull by the horns and do it anyway!

ANSEL ADAMS WAS 79 YEARS OLD WHEN HE CREATED ONE OF HIS FAMOUS PHOTOS:

Ansel Adams in his early years as a pro photographer.

In 1979, Ansel Adams was 79 years old when he was commissioned by President Jimmy Carter to take the official portrait of the President of the United States.

Ansel Adams was 79 years old when he took this photo for President Jimmy Carter.

123PHOTOGO IS THE PLACE FOR ALL PHOGRAPHERS, INCLUDING CELL PHONE PHOTOGRAPHERS!

HOW TO MAKE YOUR PHOTOS TRULY UNFORGETTABLE:

photography of sunset
Photo by André Cook on Pexels.com

When you think about a photo that is unforgettable, what kind of photo do you think of? Is it a sunset photo? How about one step further and go with a “twilight photo”. Or is it some person doing something amazing.

There are tricks to make your photos “unforgettable”, and I am going to go over these steps now. I have checked out all those photos that have been classified as “unforgettable” as well, and see if you agree. Don’t these photos just somehow fit the mold?

1- Frame your photo:

This does not mean to physically put your photo in a frame, but as you take a photo, if you have the chance to find something in the foreground or even in the background that can frame around your subject, you will be way ahead. Here are some examples:

daisies in frame
Photo by Ruslan Sikunov on Pexels.com
confident black lady with closed eyes near frame with plants
Photo by Dziana Hasanbekava on Pexels.com
Photo by Gable Denims

2- Movement in your photo:

When shooting something that has motion or movement with it, allow the subject to have something to move into.  For example, this would be better if the subject was not in the center.  If something was moving, have some area in the frame of the photo to move into.  See examples:

people woman jump show
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
Photo by Seth Sanchez

3– Direction:

Our brain perceives information from left to right, so it’s best to position all the important stuff in the right side of the frame. Examples:

Photo by Elliot Kuhn
Photo by Alexander Hanji
Photo by Ramil Sitdikov

4- TRY A DIFFERENT CAMERA ANGLE:

Try taking photos from a different angle.  Instead of taking pictures standing up, get down to the level of the subject, if it’s a pet or child.  You will find a different story to your photo:

Photo by Matteo De Santis
Photo by Miguel Angel Aguirre
Photo by Tom

5- TRY SHOOTING WITH “NEGATIVE SPACE”

There are two spaces in every image:

  • positive space (it shows the main subject);
  • negative space (usually it’s the background).

Don’t forget to keep an eye on what is happening in the negative space; you want it to emphasize your main subject, not cramp it.

Photo courtesy of Photography talk.com
Photo by Mohammed Bager

A great blog or article on “negative space” has been done before. Check out this article HERE to learn more.

6- GIVE YOUR PHOTOS “DEPTH”

Depth will give your shot a more three-dimensional and rich feel. There are few features that can help you achieve it:

  • parallel lines, which come to one point in the distance;
  • gradually dissolving fog will make your photo seem layered;
  • tone (volume is transmitted through color: darker objects appear closer, and lighter objects appear farther away);
  • depth of field (if you blur the background, clear objects will appear closer, while fuzzy objects will seem more distant).
Photo by Bas Lammers
Photo by Bas Lammers
Photo by Bas Lammers

7- HIGHLIGHT THE “FOREGROUND”

When taking a scenic shot, that has depth, add something in the foreground.  If you add something in the foreground, your viewers will feel like they can relate to the size and depth of the picture more.

Photo by Bas Lammers
Photo by Murad Osman
a beautiful yellow pea flower
Photo by Batitay Japheth on Pexels.com

8- Watch for shadows and reflections to make your photo amazing:

Use these elements to make your picture more interesting and dramatic. You can create a visual ’dialogue’ between the subject and its reflection (shadow).

Photo by Anna Atkina
trees near body of water
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
panoramic view of city lit up at night
Photo by Amar Saleem on Pexels.com

9- Take photos during the “golden hour” or the “blue hour”

The “Golden Hour” is my favorite time to shoot.  It is the one hour before sunset.  The colors have gone to a golden color in the sky and the colors everywhere are a nice warm golden hue.  It really warms things up and makes things very pleasant.

GOLDEN HOUR:

macro photography of pink flowers
Photo by Ray Bilcliff on Pexels.com
Photo by Lanny Cottrell – Editor of 123Photogo

BLUE HOUR:

This is the time when the sun has set, or just before the sun comes up.  The light is predominately blue.  Check it out:  This is often called twilight:

Photo by Joe Penniston
Photo by Lanny Cottrelll – Editor of 123Photogo

CONCLUSION:

There are many ideas that you can use to create an unforgettable photo. Study these ideas shown here, and go make some unforgettable photos.

Want to share your photos? Check this out:

Also, don’t forget to sign up for our monthly newsletter. Always something special on these newsletters.

An email list is the best way to get the detailed new, the latest news, plus special offers on products and even coupons to get free access to sites, and information, and products.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: 123PhotoGo, http://www.123photogo.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

FUJIFILM ANNOUNCES IT’S NEW FLAGSHIP CAMERA TODAY:

FUJI FILM NEW FLAGSHIP CAMERA: X-H2S

FujiFilm is a big player in the photo world. In fact, most photo magazines, most professional photographers know of it’s reputation, and are always thrilled when they introduce a new camera.

Fujifilm has confirmed our speculations and officially announced today via its X-Summit, the FUJIFILM s-h2s, joining the fifth-generation lineup of its X Series mirrorless digital flagship cameras. The X-H2S is expected to release in July 2022.

This latest model from Fujifilm boasts the highest stills and video performance we have ever seen in the history of the X Series with a new stacked-layer back-illuminated X-Trans CMOS 5 HS sensor with 26.16-megapixels.

The Fujifilm X-H2S has been long awaited by enthusiasts of its predecessor, the FujiFilm X-H1S. After much speculation by camera rumor’s hints on what we could potentially expect from Fujifilm’s latest flagship X Series offering,  the announced features and specifications of the X-H2S certainly do not disappoint.

Featuring a high-speed X-Processor 5, the X-H2S is capable of double the processing speed of the X-H1 with significantly improved AF accuracy and image resolution when at low ISO sensitivity and reduced noise in stills when at high ISO sensitivity.

This 26.16MP flagship inherits the previous model’s back-illumination style sensor but also the stack-layer structure, becoming the first stacked APS-C sensor that has quadrupled the speed to read signals compared with the X-H1 model. 

An evolved AF-system is equipped within the X-H2S that is capable of shooting up to 40 frames per second in a blackout-free burst mode, boasting a better readout speed that is four times faster than the current model and a faster AF rate during continuous shooting. The X-H2S’ AI processor also offers newly developed subject-recognition accuracy and subject-detection AF tracking technology!

The improved prediction algorithm within the X-H2S for AF has supposedly led to a major boost in the camera’s capability to track a moving subject. The new subject-detection AF function detects and automatically tracks not only the human face and eyes, but also animals, birds, cars, motorcycles, bicycles, airplanes and trains while keeping a targeted subject in focus constantly, even in low-contrast conditions.

The new Fujifilm X-H2S also boasts evolved video performance, able to record high-definition video while retaining extensive color information. The camera can film high-speed 4K/120P video allowing fast-moving subjects to be presented in smooth slow-motion with finer details.

NEW FUJIFILM CAMERA WITH THE 18-120MM LENS

The new sensor and advanced processor within the X-H2S enables filming 4:2:2 10bit video at 6.2K/30P and 4K/120P, and can also record 4K/60P video without cropping as a result of its reduced rolling-shutter effect. 

When using the camera’s electronic shutter, it can shoot over 1,000 frames continuously at up to 30fps in JPEG as well as 20fps in RAW. The X-H2S supports a variety of codecs including three Apple ProRes codecs: 422, 422 HQ, and 422 LT. 

The AF video performance is also said to be enhanced with the AF+MF function supported when in video mode, and offers the same subject-detection AF function and tracking a fast-moving subject in both stills and videos.

In addition to its impressive video recording and enhanced AF tracking abilities, the Fujifilm X-H2S supports some other exciting features such as an all-new five-axis in-body image stabilization mechanism, which can offer up to 7.0-stop advantage as well as a new sensing control function.

The new X-H2S camera in addition inherits many of the popular design features of the X-H1, such as a larger grip to support larger lenses, a top panel LCD display for users to check the camera settings any time, and a highly robust body that can withstand potential heavy professional use.

The 1.62-million-dot vari-angle LCD monitor offers improved operability along with its buttons and dials upgraded to allow for load adjustment to the AF ON button, so that users can handle the camera exactly as they intend.

The camera’s electronic viewfinder uses a high-resolution 5.76-million-dot panel with  0.8x magnification. The smooth viewfinder has a frame rate of approximately 120fps also offers improved visibility as a result of strong suppression of parallax and distortion, that can often occur when eye positions become displaced while using the viewfinder.

Lower power consumption is another great feature of the X-H2S, extending the maximum video recording time while offering dual memory card slots with support for a CFexpress Type B memory card and a UHS-II SD card. Shutter durability has also been upgraded to withstand 500,000 actuations during Fujifilm’s testing process.

Fujifilm X-H2S with new 150-600mm supertelephoto zoom (Image credit: Fujifilm)

The Fujifilm X-H2S APS-C flagship mirrorless digital camera will be priced at : $2,499 / £2,499 / AU$4,449 approximately) available for pre-order directly from Fujifilm and other retailers from July.

WHY CHOOSE A FUJIFILM CAMERA OVER NIKON OR SONY OR CANON?

FujiFilm cameras have been around a long time, and have made their own cameras for a long time. They have been ranked as one of the best built cameras coming from Japan, as well as using incredibly sharp lenses. FujiFilm is an actual lens manufacture, and has control over every element of the lenses too. And if you get a chance to hold a FujiFilm camera, you can’t help but be impressed. The durability, the technology is there and it will give any other brand a good run for their money.

BECAUSE DIGITAL CAMERA WORLD IS THE LEADER IN GIVING US BREAKING NEWS ON NEW CAMERAS AND SUCH, MUCH OF THIS ARTICLE IS FROM “DIGITAL CAMERA WORLD”. OUR THANKS TO THEM FOR THIS AMAZING ARTICLE.

SEE THE NEW EXCITING FUJIFILM S-H2S IN ACTION:

Click the image above to see how well this camera performed for professional photographers.

PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE GARDEN:

assorted color flowers
Photo by Leigh Patrick on Pexels.com

I am an avid gardener, as well as photographer. Photography and gardening go together. My wife loves to do the flower garden, and I usually worry about all the bushes, trees, and vegetable gardening. Between the two of us, we have an amazing yard. We feed birds from a feeder hanging from our pear tree, so we have the beauty of the birds to add to that as well. This is truly one piece of heaven here on earth.

Photographing the different gardens

As a photographer, I am mostly looking for color and the beauties of the flowers. Here are just a couple of flowers from our garden:

TIPS ON FLOWER PHOTOGRAPHY:

  • Make sure you understand your depth of field control, to get the right amount of flower in focus, and the background out of focus (if you wish). Controlling your aperture is one thing that helps all photos, not just close-up photos, with the perfect picture I think. For further information on “depth of field” go HERE
  • Most flowers are small, and you want to fill the frame with the flower. Appropriate close-up equipment will work the best. #1 lens to be recommended is the macro lens. Check your cameras’ lens catalogue for the best lens for you. Another great source is “close-up” filters. CHECK HERE For more information. Another great accessory, if you don’t have, is EXTENSION TUBES, which is a blog I did just a few days ago.
  • Next thing to watch out for is the wind! Yikes! Now you want to get this picture, and the wind is blowing the flower around. That is not a good thing if you want a sharp picture. I know the flower will be there tomorrow, so I will wait a day or two. Or, you might try a fast shutter speed, and that could be easy enough when you have your aperture set at F4. Try that and if you still have issues with the wind, WAIT ANOTHER DAY!

TIPS ON VEGETABLE PHOTOGRAPHY:

close up photography of orange carrots
Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

I seem to notice that most photos of vegetables are done after the harvest. This might be good to do some experimenting on vegetable photography. Stay tuned for those photos in a few months.

As you take photos of vegetables, that you have harvested, try different ways to take the photo. Such as:

  • In someone’s hands
  • In a bucket, freshly picked or harvested
  • Arranged on the table
  • Shown boiling or cooking

Photos of your beautiful yard:

Ok, if you are a gardener like me, part of gardening is to see the whole beautiful yard, with flowers, trees, bushes, and vegetables if that looks good too. Here are some examples:

photography of table and chairs near plants
Photo by Valeria Boltneva on Pexels.com
assorted plants with trees photography
Photo by Creative Vix on Pexels.com
adult attractive beautiful brunette
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

An email list is the best way to get the detailed new, the latest news, plus special offers on products and even coupons to get free access to sites, and information, and products.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: 123PhotoGo, http://www.123photogo.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

COPYRIGHT AND PHOTOGRAPHY!

As a photographer, how does the copyright symbol protect you?

Why do we need copyright as photographers and what is its purpose? In a nutshell, copyright is there to stop anyone using your images for anything they want.

DOES THIS APPLY TO ONLY PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS?

The answer to this is NO. This works for any amateur photographer who takes pictures. and whilst it does protect professional creatives, it also applies to anyone producing any type of creative work on any level, including photography. Even a simple snapshot on your smartphone is copyrighted. 

However, thanks to the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, which was created in 1886 and has 179 country members including the UK, your work is pretty much protected the same wherever you are in the world.

An email list is the best way to get the detailed new, the latest news, plus special offers on products and even coupons to get free access to sites, and information, and products.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: 123PhotoGo, http://www.123photogo.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

WHO OWNS THE IMAGE?

It’s simple – if you take an image, then you own the copyright to that image. Under UK copyright law, any person who ‘creates’ an image after 1st August 1989 is the owner of the image for their lifetime plus another 70 years. You don’t have to register your photographs to have them copyrighted as the law comes into existence as soon as the image is created.

WHAT IF SOMEONE ELSE TAKES A PHOTO ON YOUR CAMERA?

But what would happen if someone else took an image on your camera – would you own the copyright? No. The person who took the image has the copyright. There was a case a while back concerning a ‘selfie’ taken by a monkey on photographer David Slater’s camera. Slater claimed he owned the copyright to the image, whereas Wikimedia Commons and the blog Techdirt claimed as the macaque took the image then the photographer didn’t have the copyright.

Photo by Michalakis Ppalis with Pixel photos

Animal rights group Peta also became involved, saying the macaque should own the copyright. Slater and Peta eventually settled, with Slater agreeing to give a quarter of the funds he receives from selling the selfie to registered charities dedicated to protecting the welfare or habitat of the macaque. The image is still on Wikimedia Commons, against the wishes of the photographer, who can no longer afford to pursue his challenge.

There may be circumstances where you might take the image but not own the copyright to the image, for example, if you are employed by a company. Most photographers employed by an organization have to sign a contract before they start work to agree to release the copyright to their employer. Legally, a contract needs to be in place if the copyright is assigned over to another person or party. Although there are many downloadable documents online, we advise that if you
want your contracts to be used as proof in a court of law, you get a professional such as a solicitor or lawyer to draw them up.

If you are a follower of this website, you know I take great pride to include the photographer’s name with every photo. But, why can I use someone else’s photos on my website? That is because the photographer(s) have agreed to let anyone use their photo. I am sure they are hoping that their photo is used and gets out there, with their name on it, so it wasn’t in vain. I use two companies that offer FREE PHOTOS without the need to obtain copyright permission. And that is Pexels.com, and Unsplash. Both companies are using photographs from great photographers. And I have always made it a point to attach a name to that photo.

tree with maple leaves
Photo by Valiphotos on Pexels.com

I love this above photo, and you have seen this several times throughout my many blogs.

Do you need to add the © symbol to your photos?

No, you don’t need to add anything to your images for them to be copyrighted to you – they are automatically your intellectual property. Intellectual property rights (IPR) are the rights granted to creators and owners of works that are the result of human intellectual creativity.

Although you don’t have to copyright your images if you are posting or uploading them online, it can be a good idea to add a watermark and the copyright symbol as extra protection. Doing so gives a clear indication to your audience that the image is owned by you. Also if an individual or company wants to track you down to use your image for commercial purposes, they can find you more easily. Adding copyright information to the metadata of your image is also a good idea.

What should I do if someone steals my work?

This is always a tough situation. Here is what usually happens:

If a company or individual takes your work, this is called infringement and you have the legal right to stop them from doing so. How you pursue them is up to you, but it’s often best to avoid going to court as this can be costly. Instead, approach the individual or company directly to inform them of their breach. Once contact has been established, a resolution can usually be made. The Intellectual Property Office (IPO) offers a mediation service at a cost to parties involved in an IP-related dispute (see links and reference boxout for details).

If no resolution can be made, you have the right to take the matter to court. However, as outlined above, this can be costly and seeking legal advice is advised. As stated on the government website, a court of law can stop that person from making further infringing use of the material by granting an injunction, award the copyright owner damages, and make the infringing party give up the goods to the copyright owner.

Will a signature on my photo work well as a copyrighted photo?

Here is one of my own photos with a signature on the front. That is a great copyright symbol.

I almost always feel that if you can put a signature on your photo, that would be harder for a person to take it off. However, they could just crop that area out, the same they could with a copyright symbol. But, a signature seems to make it definitely look like that photo totally belongs to this photographer.

I had a company by the name of PHOTOPOLISH to create my signature and an easy app on my computer to add my signature to all my photos. There are probably others, but, they worked well for me.