TAMRON LENSES

Photo by Lanny Cottrell – editor

I was recently invited to a Tamron open house at one of the local Photo Stores: Allen’s Camera in Layton, Utah. I think that it is always fun to go to these shows to see and handle the merchandise. The rep was very informative and loves his job. He gave great details into the Tamron World. Let’s take a look at Tamron in detail now.

HISTORY OF TAMRON:

Kabushiki-gaisha Tamuron) is a Japanese company manufacturing photographic lenses, optical components and commercial/industrial-use optics. Tamron Headquarters is located in Saitama City in the Saitama prefecture of Japan.

The name of the company came from the surname of Uhyoue Tamura who was instrumental in developing Tamron’s optical technologies. It was only on the company’s 20th anniversary that the name was changed to Tamron (from Taisei Optical).

In the fiscal year ending 31 December 2017, net sales totaled 60.496 billion yen and operating income was 4.24 billion yen, up 79.8% from 2016. At that time, the consolidated company had 4,640 employees and five production plants: in Hirosaki, Namioka and Owani in Japan, and one in China and Viet Nam, respectively.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TODAY:

In the lens processing, in order to manufacture a lens with the required performance, various conditions need to be adjusted by selecting the machine used for manufacturing and adjusting the polishing time according to the magnitude of curvature and the characteristics of the material.
For example, high-pixilation and high-definition are yearly advanced in CMOS image sensor used in cameras and a lens surface-roughness, unevenness or waviness negatively effects the lens imaging performance.
To enable a highly accurate lens, Tamron reflect a simulation result to a processing accuracy from the optical designing stage.
Tamron’s lens processing technology is covering a wide range, multiple lens bonding with curved surfaces, processing with plane lens and prism lens, and prism lens bonding with each other. From now on, as a new usage, optical lens is expected to be used with laser and to be required a complicated irregular shape or prism shape integrating various technologies.
To produce multifarious lenses required in the future, Tamron is newly developing and improving the processing technology and handing down its established expertise by cooperating the lens processing know-how and the optical development technology.

To say that Tamron has a lot of different lenses is an understatement, but what they are truly proud of is their amazing zoom lenses. When I was at the Tamron show at the local photo dealer the other day, I was amazed with this lens, and I think it’s the one they are most proud of too:

Go to extremes with the world’s first* 22.2x ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom.

Introducing the world’s first ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens for the APS-C format. With a focal length range of 18-400mm and 22.2x zoom, it has an ultra-telephoto range equivalent to 620mm in the 35mm format. This brings distant subjects closer, while providing perspective-flattening effects that are only possible with an extreme telephoto lens. Plus it offers exceptional optical performance across the entire zoom range—from wide angle to ultra-telephoto. With this new lens—and its Moisture-Resistant Construction—Tamron brings the art of photography to the joy of travel. Now you can use the same lens to shoot everything from stunning landscapes and neon-lit cities to detailed portraits and delicate flora. The ultra-telephoto range makes it just as easy to photograph animals and sports. And with a maximum magnification ratio of 1:2.9, you can even enjoy tele-macro photography.

That was the part that I thought was so incredible is this lens macro ratio is 1:2.9! And you get that macro ratio even at 400mm! That opens out amazing possibilities for every photographer.

ANOTHER MOST AMAZING LENS I FELL IN LOVE WITH: TAMRON’S 11-20MM ZOOM LENS:

If you have the urge to shoot landscapes, then this lens is for you. Take a look at this video:

TAMRON MAKES A LOT OF LENSES

If you go to Tamron’s website, and browse around you will discover that they make a lot of lenses. It’s these few lenses I have highlighted today are the ones I think Tamron has excelled at.

ONE MORE LENS TO HIGHLIGHT: 150-500MM LENS:

And one more video to go with this incredible lens:

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LENSES BY SIGMA!

Photo courtesy of blog.sigmaphoto.com – shot with the 85mm 1.4 ART lens

In the world of 3rd party lenses, I think everyone has heard of SIGMA LENSES. This is a company that has been around for a long time, making incredible lenses for all kinds of cameras.

HISTORY OF SIGMA (as per Wikipedia):

SIGMA CORPORATION

is a Japanese company, manufacturing cameras, lenses and flashes and other photographic accessories. All Sigma products are produced in the company’s own Aizu factory in Bandai, Fukushima, Japan. Although Sigma produces several camera models, the company is best known for producing high-quality lenses and other accessories that are compatible with the cameras produced by other companies.

The company was founded in 1961 by Michihiro Yamaki, who was Sigma’s CEO until his death at age 78 in 2012.

Sigma products work with cameras from Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Olympus, and Panasonic as well as their own cameras.

Sigma has also made lenses under the Quantaray name, which have been sold exclusively by Ritz Camera. Similarly, Sigma lenses were sold exclusively by the former Wolf Camera, but following the merger of Wolf and Ritz, both brands can be purchased.

LENSES MADE TODAY (2022):

When I went to their website, I wanted to see their list or catalogue of lenses available. And I was really shocked. To me, it seems that the lenses they made covered every type of lens you would ever need, including “standard” lenses. I was most surprised that they made “standard” lenses for the different camera manufactures.

aurora borealis and sun visible in sky of northern norway
Photo by Tobias Bjørkli on Pexels.com

Take a look at the amount of different lenses they make for your camera:

WIDE ANGLE LENSES

silhouettes of cowboy and herd of horses galloping in dust at sunset
Photo by yavuz pancareken on Pexels.com

(18 Lenses)

Wide-angle camera lenses capture the larger side of life with a broader angle of view. Photographers rely on these essential lenses, including the 14mm, 20mm, 24mm, 28mm, 12-24mm and 14-24mm.

STANDARD LENSES:

photo of woman looking through camera
Photo by Artem Podrez on Pexels.com

(12 Lenses)

Explore the Sigma lineup of standard camera lenses with a field of view similar to the human eye. This popular category includes lenses such as the 50mm 1.4, 35mm 1.4, and 24-70mm 2.8. Standard by definition, exceptional by performance.

TELEPHOTO LENSES:

brown owl on tree branch
Photo by Erik Karits on Pexels.com

(19 Lenses)

Bring the world closer with a telephoto camera lens. A tool countless photographers rely on for added reach, this category includes such lenses as the 70-200mm 2.8, 100-400mm and 150-600mm.

MULTI-PURPOSE LENSES:

action athletes base baseball
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

(5 Lenses)

Wide-angle to telephoto zoom and everything in between, multi-purpose lenses are designed to be light, versatile and highly efficient. Sigma manufacturers several multi-puirpose lenses, including the 18-300mm, 18-250mm and 18-200mm.

MACRO LENSES:

close up photo of ladybug on leaf during daytime
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

(6 Lenses)

Macro camera lenses allow a photographer to bring to life the small but lively world around them. Explore every detail with such lenses as the 70mm and 105mm.

FISHEYE LENSES:

people in brown traditional wear under blue sky
Photo by Denniz Futalan on Pexels.com

(2 Lenses)

Fisheye lenses bring a whole new perspective to your vision. From Diagonal to Circular, Sigma offers a variety of premium lenses for APS-C and Full Frame cameras.

OS LENSES:

person riding bike making trek on thin air
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

(16 Lenses)

Sigma Optical Stabilization (OS) helps compensate for camera shake by reducing vibration in the DSLR camera system while taking a photograph. Some lenses with Sigma image stabilization include the 24-105mm F4,150-600mm and 70-200mm 2.8.

SIGMA “ART” LENSES

One thing that has always intrigued me with Sigma, is they make a line of lenses they call “Art Lenses”! Without even checking the details of this lens, I assumed that this series of lenses was made sharper, more colorful (yes, lenses can enhance the color with their special coatings), more detailed than their regular lenses. Their lenses in their standard lineup are nothing short of AMAZING, so how do the ART lenses compare, and are they worth that extra money?

JUST WHAT ARE SIGMA ART LENSES?

So many names and words are thrown at you in the photography world- L lenses, Prime lenses, and… ART? ART as a term in photography equipment has become so big that most don’t even know the brand that produced the legendary ART: Sigma. Sigma’s ART lens line is a high-end, exquisite quality optic product that is very sought after by professional photographers. 

So what makes the ART lens have such a life of its own in the industry? Well, a mix between brilliant performance, excellent engineering, and an attractive price tag all lend a hand at the lens line’s brilliant reputation. 

Characteristics of the ART Lens Line

For starters, every lens company has a high-end line and more consumer-friendly line. The ART series is the high end, luxury line for camera and lens brand Sigma Corporation of America. Originally started in Japan, Sigma has gained exceptional notoriety for the quality of their ART line. 

Sigma’s ART line is divided into the following expected categories: Wide-angle lenses, large-aperture fixed lenses, telephoto lenses, standard lenses, macro lenses, ultra-wide angle lenses, and fish-eye lenses. Something for everyone. 

The ART line is engineered specifically for sharpness and optic performance. They are lenses created for images that give the sharpest details a photographer can possibly aim for. Even with the widest openings, Sigma ART lenses exhibit exceptional focal plane sharpness. This is because the focusing mechanism is quite unique to the brand itself, and cannot be found in other models. 

The ART line also tends to have wider apertures, from f/1.2 to f/2.8. The bokeh blades create a more natural and creamy shallow depth of field than most lenses, and are nicely designed to avoid chromatic aberration at wide apertures. For those unfamiliar, chromatic aberration is a common optical problem that causes a purple or green outline to appear around your subject.

ART lenses also characteristically produce more vibrant and poppy colors. Although a lot of color has to do with the camera body itself, the lens does play a role nowadays (especially in mirrorless systems). 

Finally, ART lenses are created in all notable mounts, such as Canon, Nikon, Sony, and even Leica. Sigma ART lenses are even able to have their mounts converted through the conversion service offered by the company. 

To get this kind of “extra” quality in a lens, you can plan on spending more than the standard lens in the same style. They are also a bit bigger lenses, but, to get that kind of quality, who cares?

A new blog site to check out:

What I thought was also really cool, is that Sigma has their own blogs right on their own website. You want to check out some pretty cool blogs, go to: SIGMA BLOG

Ready to try Sigma Lenses? They are one of several worth checking out. I am going to give you some more options to choose from, because this Wednesday, in 2 days, I will be reviewing

TAMRON LENSES!

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GO AHEAD! TAKE PHOTOS IN BAD WEATHER!

person riding a bicycle during rainy day
Photo by Genaro Servín on Pexels.com

I know that good photographers are organized people. They plan a day to go take pictures, and if it storms, so what! I want to take this time to talk about what you need to do to prepare to take your photo journey, even if it rains.

Always carry a weatherproof camera in your bag

From the previous blog, CLICK HERE TO SEE PREVIOUS BLOG we learned how your photos turn out better in stormy weather. Think about this when it’s raining:

  • The rain cleared out all the dust in the air, making it look richer in color, and the colors just seem more enhanced.
  • Not too many photographers will brave the bad weather, so your chance of getting more unique photos will certainly increase.
  • You will capture photos that are unique, even if it’s the same old landscape photos
photography of mountains under cloudy sky
Photo by Simon Berger on Pexels.com

Notice this photo above. Storm is rolling in. Normally you would get this beautiful landscape photo with nice blue skies. But these dark stormy looking clouds are amazing, and will certainly win the hearts of some photo fans.

If you have some of the newer cameras that have just been released from Pentax, Nikon, Sony, Olympus, Canon, you will notice that their new flagship cameras have all been upgraded to include incredible weather sealing. Now you can go out and take photos in the storm without worry.

BUT BEWARE: YOUR LENSES MAY NOT BE WEATHER RATED. Go through the lens catalog for your new camera and find the weather rated lenses available for your camera.

airport bolt bright danger
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

MY PREFERRED WAY OF EQUIPMENT:

Most of the time people don’t want to go with plastic bags, and special equipment to make their current camera weatherproof. I have had extremely good success with this camera:

CHECK OUT THE DETAILS OF THIS CAMERA:

Uncompromising water, shock, dust, and freeze protection. Approximately 20 effective megapixel for sharp, high-resolution, low-noise images with a wide dynamic range. Camera body of tough aluminum-panel chassis equipped with high-precision GPS, a powerful LED Ring Light, and electronic gimbal stabilization. Venture into the wild with an all-weather compact camera equal to any and all conditions.

More ideas of how to take photos in bad weather, CLICK HERE

One more link, CLICK HERE

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BAD WEATHER? PERFECT TIME FOR PHOTOGRAPHY!

We’ve all sat, staring out of our window and cursing at the rain poring down or the flat, grey sky that just happened to cloud over on few hours we’ve managed to set aside in our busy schedule to head out and shoot some photos. But all is not lost for the opportunistic and well prepared photographer.


“Story” captured by Nicholas A. Tonelli

BE PATIENT

After many rainfalls or storms, comes a spectacular burst of light. Often this light lasts only momentarily, but is worth waiting for. But you’re never going to catch it if you’re still staring out of that window. Part of making good photographs is being an opportunist. Weather reports are easily accessible through the internet, over the radio, and in newspapers, often with detailed information.

You might be able to find out if the cloud cover or storm is about to pass. If not, head out anyway. Yes, it might all be in vain and remain gray and unappealing until nightfall and be a complete waste of time, but what if it isn’t?

If you speak to, or read any book written by a successful landscape photographer, they will tell you stories about how they visited a place dozens of times and waited for hours before getting that one in a million shot. Have a look at that shot. Was it worth the time? Chances are it was. Imagine the satisfaction gained from someone looking at your photo and letting out a breathless “Wow!” Then you’ll be the one telling the stories. A simple way to think about it is that you get out what you put in.

BE PREPARED:

Have you done any research on your subject? Have you visited your location at this time of day before? Do you have a list, or at least a mental outline, of the photos you want? Have you considered the equipment you might need to take? Answering these questions will take you a long way to being able to seize the moment when it does eventually arrive.

Photo by Beau Rogers; ISO 100, f.8.0, 1.6-second exposure.

Instead of fumbling around trying to attach lenses, tripods, filters and any other gadgets that might be necessary, (and I do mean “might”), you will simply be able to step out of your car, or hiding place, gear in hand, and calmly collect the images you’ve been imagining.

A little foresight in taking care of these things beforehand allows you to focus completely on taking photos once in the field. As with anything else, if you can concentrate completely, you’ll likely do a better job.

WHAT’S YOUR PURPOSE?

Think about what you are actually trying to achieve with these pictures. Do you even need blue skies? Many a moody, muted landscape has been created using the worst weather conditions. If you have an interest in shooting black and white images, you could be in for a real treat. Many subjects, such as outdoor portraits, can work better in overcast conditions, enabling you to pick up the lines in someone’s face and add character to the portrait without having to worry about your subject squinting their eyes from the sun or dark shadows appearing over half of their face.

photo of a wooden bridge
Photo by Mark Neal on Pexels.com

Most successful photography, like anything else, comes from having a clear goal and taking the steps necessary to achieve it. It also comes from working with the elements and planning for various possibilities. Open yourself up to new ideas and you will find that your photography improves markedly.

iN 2 DAYS: WHAT EQUIPMENT TO USE DURING BAD WEATHER! CAN YOU USE YOUR CURRENT CAMERA?

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NIKON TO OFFER 50 NEW “Z” LENSES BY 2025

Nikkor lenses are some of the best and have a huge variety of lenses

We are going to see a huge new surge in lenses within the next few years. All because so many of the brands of cameras changed their lens mount. Why? Because they changed from a DSLR camera, which uses lenses that are about the same size as the older 35mm film cameras, to the smaller mirrorless cameras which made it so the lenses mount, and the lenses went smaller. And that means what was good with one type of lens mount, they will now need to do the same thing to the smaller lens mounts, such as the new NIKON Z camera series.

NIKON Z LENSES NOW

As of this writing, Nikon makes about 27 lenses already for their Z camera series. So, that means they will release about 23 more lenses in the next few years. It is amazing how many lenses need to be created to accomplish all the different types of photography there is (Hmmm, that might be a good blog subject).

7 New lenses are about to be released soon:

With that being said, it is obvious that they have some already announced or rumored to be releases soon:

  • A 12-28mm DX zoom
  • A 200-600mm super-telephoto zoom
  • A 24mm DX lens
  • A 26mm lens
  • An 85mm S-line lens
  • A 400mm S-line lens
  • A 600mm S-line lens

Of course, that leaves many future lenses unaccounted for, though I’d certainly wager that we’ll get a 70-200mm f/4 lens, designed as a low-cost 70-200mm f/2.8 alternative. Look for a 500mm f/4 S-line lens, designed for bird and wildlife photographers, and several wider primes (including, perhaps, a 14mm f/2.8 and/or a 35mm f/1.4).

Once Nikon has covered all its more “conventional” bases, keep an eye out for the specialty lenses: fisheye lenses and zoom lenses, additional macro prime lenses, and tilt shift lenses. In the meantime, Nikon mirrorless shooters can still gain access to basic and specialty models via the FTZ adapters.

HOW DOES THIS COMPARE TO THEIR COMPETITORS: CANON AND SONY?

CANON; Canon currently has 25 lenses in their RF series of lenses. The RF lenses are the lenses Canon makes for their smaller mirrorless cameras. And they are planning on releasing about 30 more in the next 5 years. That should complete their lineup.

SONY: Well, Sony has had a head start on their lens lineup for about the last 7 years. So they already have about 70 lenses for their mirrorless cameras. Sony hasn’t shown any signs of slowing down, either, so for now – and for the foreseeable future – Sony will continue to lead the pack.

Sony is already ahead of the game with close to 70 lenses in their lineup.

HOW TO PICK AND CHOOSE A LENS:

I was looking through my arsenal of information I have available, but the best one is in my professional course, that describes how lenses can be used, what millimeter lenses are the best, etc. Go to my professional course titled “BASIC PHOTO COURSE”, and it is here at this link. Click here.

NOW WHAT WILL YOU DO TO

If you are serious about photography, you will want to get some extra lenses for your tools. It is amazing how your photography can be enhanced with a variety of lenses. You can choose a lens for the following reasons:

  • A wide angle lens for taking breathtaking landscapes
  • A macro lens for taking pictures close-up
  • A telephoto lens to get photos of wildlife
  • A fast lens to be able to shoot in low light
  • A fisheye lens to get almost a 180 degree view
  • A lens to take the perfect portrait
  • And so many other types of subjects.

Coming next blog: learn why there are so many different lenses, what makes a lens cost more than others, what are the different uses of lenses? Complete instruction on lenses and their uses.

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MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY SUBJECT IDEAS:

blade of grass blur bright close up
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

One of the most thrilling parts of photography is MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY! I have learned to love macro photography ever since I stuck some close-up filters on the front of my lens. It brought me to a whole new world.

Today, I want to present some amazing fun ideas for macro photography. These are ideas and tips of things to photograph, but not how to do macro photography. If you want to learn how to do basic macro photography, click here: https://123photogo.com/2021/10/22/tips-on-macro-still-photography/

IDEA # 1 – CUTLERY

Taking photos of cutlery is an interesting idea, but, with the proper lighting, and the unique designs found on cutlery, you have a winning idea here.

Shun Santoku knife

IDEA # 2 – FEATHERS

This is a fun and interesting idea. We see feathers all the time on the ground, on a tree, or wherever. But have you really looked at them close? They are an amazing subject:

Peacock feather

IDEA #3 – WATER DROPLETS:

This one is a classic, but be creative, and find your water on unusual surfaces like a wire fence, a cobweb, or a rear-view mirror. Early morning dew makes almost any subject magical. In the spring or fall, your can look for frost instead of dew.

Water drops with reflections.

IDEA #4 – GLASS:

Close up photos of fine crystal glassware can yield wonderful abstracts filled with curved lines and reflections. For added fun, place glasses side by side, or one behind the other to create lines where they overlap. You can fill the glasses with colored water for even more creative images. Finally, you can add a sheet of clear, but textured glass (available for purchase at stained glass craft stores) in front of your glassware. The possibilities are endless.

Stained glass windows

IDEA #5 – FOIL REFLECTIONS:

Now when I hear about this idea, I thought about this carefully. Why? And then I saw some examples and then asked: Why not? Use a variety of different color lights to enhance your creation.

IDEA # 6- FRUITS AND VEGETABLES:

This is something that could be easy, but, I think it would be more fun, if you “posed” the fruit or vegetables. Don’t just go up to the item and snap, but, pose them like for a still photo.

Pose your fruits and vegetables. The photo is much more interesting that way.

I had a whole blog on taking photos of fruits and vegetables. Check this out: https://123photogo.com/2021/06/05/tips-on-photographing-your-favorite-fruit-or-vegetable/

ITEM #7 – RUST AND PEELING PAINT:

Fascinating rust patterns can be found on an old car, or even a metal garbage can in the park. Peeling paint graces old fences and walls. Most people pass by such items without a second glance. Not you! Break out your macro lens, and reveal the hidden beauty. Just beware of harsh shadows if you’re photographing in bright sunlight.

IDEA #8 – CAR DETAILS:

The sleek lines of shiny chrome and trim on a polished car can provide hours of photographic entertainment. You can photograph your own car, but don’t be shy about taking your camera to an antique car show. Car owners are usually proud of their vehicles and won’t mind you photographing the details.

IDEA #9 – ANIMAL BITS

The texture of fur on your dog or the wrinkled skin of an elephant at the zoo can make a great close up shot. Paws, claws and teeth are fun, too, as long as you keep out of harm’s way. Finally, eyes always make compelling subjects. Shoot close ups of the eyes of your dog or cat (or a person!).

Animal fur, and the detail

IDEA #10 – INSECTS

The amazing small world of insects. So unique when you get up close. They could even look scary if you got close enough. Try this:

There are some special things you need to know to take pictures of insects. For further information go to: https://123photogo.com/2021/07/08/learn-how-to-take-pictures-of-insects/

IDEA #11 – FLOWERS:

Of course I have a blog I have done on flower photography. Just learn the details of great flower photography here: https://123photogo.com/2021/05/20/ideas-of-how-to-take-the-best-flower-photos/


This is a new series of articles we will be doing, to give you different ideas with different subjects to help you with your photography ideas.

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A GUIDE TO MINIMALIST PHOTOGRAPHY:

Photo by Jan Huber on Unsplash

Minimalist photography seems to be an art that has taken off lately. And I am one that really likes this type of photography. This is a simple photo to do, as well as very attractive to those looking at the photo.

What is minimalist photography, and how can you capture stunning minimalist photos?

Minimalism is a popular artistic technique, and it’s a great way to spice up your images. (It’s also a good way to generate lots of attention on social media.) But beginners often struggle to get to grips with minimalism, which is where this article comes in handy.

WHAT IS MINIMALIST PHOTOGRAPHY?

Minimalist photography, also known as minimalism photography, is a type of image-making that relies on simplistic compositions, heavy use of empty space, and elimination of clutter.

Thanks to their simplicity, minimalistic photos often have a characteristically meditative effect:

Note that minimalist photos generally feature some form of main subject (e.g., the boat in the image above). But subject presence is kept to a minimum; here, minimalist photographers often zoom out for a small-in-the-frame subject surrounded by empty space.

Some photographers are pure minimalists, choosing to capture images that are as simple as possible (e.g., a single tree surrounded by white snow). But other photographers incorporate minimalistic elements into their work alongside non-minimalistic elements. Either approach is fine – just do what feels right!

Key elements of minimalist photography:

Minimalism can be applied to pretty much every genre of photography, including portrait, landscape, still life, architecture, and even street shooting. But minimalist photos do have a few key characteristics:

  • Negative space. Minimalist photos tend to feature lots of empty, or negative, space. Negative space is composed of expanses of pure color or texture, such as a broad stretch of ocean or a grassy lawn. (And featureless white skies are a minimalist staple!)
  • A small main subject. Minimalist compositions keep the subject small in the frame so that they’re dwarfed by negative space. As I discuss below, this can be done with a wide-angle lens or by shooting from a distance. In cases where the main subject isn’t small in the frame, it should be exceptionally simple (e.g., a few streaks of paint on a wall).
  • Limited clutter. Minimalism emphasizes simplicity, and minimalist photos tend to feature a main subject, lots of empty space, and nothing else. Minimalist photographers carefully refine their compositions until no extra elements – such as poles or telephone lines in the background – exist. The more clutter you can eliminate from your shots, the more minimalist they’ll be.

If you like, you can look at the above list as a recipe for minimalist photos. As long as you include all three items, you’ll end up with a decent minimalist shot – and as you become more familiar with minimalist compositions, your results will become more and more powerful.

Photo by Mads Schmidt Rasmussen on Unsplash

TIPS TO WATCH FOR WHEN SHOOTING MINIMALIST PHOTOS:

As I have been looking at photos that I think are the best minimalist photos, I was surprised to find out that most people follow these rules:

  • A wide field of view
  • Plenty of distance between yourself and your subject

ONE THING PHOTOGRAPHERS MISS IN MINIMALISM:

The rules of composition are often missed in minimalist photos. I went through quite a few photos where the subject was right in the middle of the frame. I found no artistic value to this, mostly because it is just so much static to a photo when the subject is right in the middle. PLEASE! use the RULE OF THIRDS, when taking photos with minimalism. See: https://123photogo.com/2021/11/12/rules-of-photography/

NEGATIVE SPACE

Another meaning for minimalist photography is “Negative Space”. As you will notice the one thing that you need to accomplish the minimalism, is to find a lot of space around the subject. I have put an article like that together already. Check this out: https://123photogo.com/2021/11/01/understanding-negative-space/

Here are just a few photos I have found that bring out the best ideas in Minimalist photography:

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