WHAT TO DO IF A PHOTOGRAPHY OPPORTUNITY FAILS:

distressed woman sitting on lakeside and touching face in despair
Photo by RODNAE Productions on Pexels.com

THIS STORY HAPPENED TO ME:

SO, HERE IS THE SCENARIO:  YOU HAD PLANS TO GO UP IN THE MOUNTAINS TO TAKE PICTURES OF THE FALL COLORS.  TO BE SPECIFIC, YOU WANT THE BEAUTIFUL PICTURES OF THE “QUAKING ASPEN” MIXED IN WITH THE PINE TREES.  YOU KNOW, THE BEAUTIFUL YELLOW LEAVES, MIXED IN WITH THE DEEP GREEN COLORS OF THE PINE TREES.  AND THEN WHEN YOU GET THERE, YOU FIND THAT, BECAUSE OF AN EARLY COLD STORM, THE QUAKING ASPEN REACTED TO THAT, AND DID NOT TURN YELLOW, BUT AN UGLY BROWN, AND JUST DROPPED THEIR LEAVES TO THE GROUND, AND EVERYTHING WAS UGLY:

I was hoping for beautiful colors and a wonderful day of photography up in the mountains. But, I was very disappointed in the results.

OK, SO YOU DROVE OVER AN HOUR TO GET THESE PHOTOS, AND YOU DON’T WANT TO WASTE YOUR TIME, WHAT SHOULD YOU DO?

TIME TO GET OUT AND “CREATE YOUR OWN SUCCESS”.  LET’S WALK AROUND AND FIND SOMETHING ELSE TO TAKE PICTURES OF.  YOU DO HAVE A FEW TOOLS IN YOUR BAG, LET’S TRY SOME CREATIVE WORK, WITH A LARGE TELEPHOTO LENS:

The trees were put on this earth to take pictures. I found it fascinating to find these trees that just were all twisted and deformed, but still healthy and continue to grow.

LOOK CLOSELY AROUND YOU AND FIND YOUR OPPORTUNITY:

Ok, so the trees in a scenery mode didn’t turn out, but as you start to wander around you notice that there are some interesting photo opportunities around you. Look at the trees, and notice the interesting things about them. Close-up opportunities await as well:

Fascinated by the bark of this tree. The leaves surrounding it just added to the photo shoot.

FIND SOME CLOUDS IF POSSIBLE:

TOO MANY TIMES WE LOOK FOR THE SCENERY, WHEN SOMETIMES THE CLOUDS, OR THE SKY MAY BE THE MAIN SUBJECT IN OUR LANDSCAPE PHOTOS.  THERE ARE A LOT OF PHOTOGRAPHERS WHO MAKE A LIVING FROM GETTING THE BEST OF THE CLOUDS.  MAKE SURE YOU USE YOUR POLARIZING FILTER TO GET THE BEST OF CLOUDS, AND A RICH BLUE SKY, LIKE THIS ONE:

landscape mountains nature sky
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

For more information about how well a polarizing filter works, CLICK HERE

BUT DON’T EVER FEEL LIKE YOU GOT TO SOME PLACE, AND THE PHOTOS YOU WANTED AREN’T THERE.  JUST LOOK FOR ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY TO TAKE SOME PICTURES OF SOMETHING ELSE.  YOU ARE A PHOTOGRAPHER WITH THE EYE TO LOOK FOR SOMETHING ELSE THAT MAY BE ARTISTIC!  A GOOD PHOTOGRAPHER IS ALWAYS LOOKING FOR SOMETHING NEW, EVEN IF THE ORIGINAL OPPORTUNITY DID NOT ARISE.  KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN FOR NEW THINGS.  

Interesting note: This blog was originally posted before I started using WORDPRESS.COM for my website. If you want to see more older posts like this, go to: www.123photogo@blogspot.com

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IN SEARCH OF GREAT BEAUTY IN NATURE:

person walking between green forest trees
Photo by Luis del Río on Pexels.com

Sometimes I feel like just taking my camera out in to nature and see what types of great photos I can get. But you know it’s a skill to go out in to nowhere and try to find a photo that meets your criteria. You want to get great photos of nature, but, how do you just come up with great photos when the scenery, the clouds, the weather don’t just turn out.

Today, I have found a video that I think tells us how one photographer (Simon Booth) just goes out and finds amazing photos to take regardless of the conditions. That to me is a special exercise called: “LEARNING TO SEE”.

I have done several courses in just that subject. There are things all around us, if we just learn to look around us, and find the right photo. I have developed a special course on “LEARNING TO “SEE” A PHOTO, THEN CREATE YOUR MASTERPIECE”. JUST “CLICK HERE” To order your special download copy now

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The above video is so good, because he can find a photo, almost everywhere he goes. For more information also go to: CLICK HERE – How to make your photos truly unforgettable.

WHY YOU SHOULD ENTER PHOTO CONTESTS:

Photo contests are one way to help you with your photography skills.

This article today comes from Adam Williams who submitted this article to “picturecorrect”. Amazing insights are certainly worth sharing.

After a few minor photo competition successes, I entered the 2013 Focus Awards absolutely full of confidence, my ego had taken hold and all I could think about was all the recognition and prizes I was going to win.

You guessed it, it was an absolute fail!

However, failure is one of my key inspirations and every time it happens (fairly often) the cogs in my mind start spinning as I try to figure out how to never let it happen again.

One of Adam Williams winning photos!

At the time, I was still a carpenter/builder and as I went about the rest of the day my mind was elsewhere contemplating how I could improve my chances of photo competition success in the future.

Then an idea struck me, a lightbulb moment, what if the winning photo competition galleries, the top 20/50/100 scoring photos that are always published on the relevant competition websites contained a pattern as to which photos might be more likely to be successful in a photo competition.

I couldn’t stop thinking about it, I raced home, turned on the computer, opened an Excel spreadsheet and created a series of columns based on photographic criteria.

Great Light, Black and White, High Saturation, etc, etc

I then scoured the galleries of my favorite photo competitions, one by one I viewed each image and ticked the various boxes on my excel spreadsheet.

I was hoping to see patterns of specific photographic criteria common to the top-scoring photos.

Not only did I find a series of patterns, their significance blew my mind.

There were three very important photographic elements found within almost all of the winning photos, so much so, if your photos didn’t contain at least two of these three elements it was almost impossible to win photo competitions.

3 Important Photographic Elements:

  1. Strong Subject
  2. Simplicity
  3. Great Light
Here is the link: https://123photogo.com/gallery-end-of-2020/

Enter Photo Competitions with the unfair advantage!

Have you ever noticed that the same handful of photographers seem to win all the high profile photo competitions?

It’s true, the same names tend to end up on the winner’s list time and time again.

Photo competitions are no different from any other competition in the fact that if it is your first time entering you are probably not going to be all that great. To be great in any competition generally requires figuring out the subtleties of success.

So what can we do to give ourselves the best chance of winning?

The reason the same photographers tend to always win is that after several years of entering they have figured out what works and what doesn’t.

Keep in mind, like me, those winners once were lousy at photo competitions too.

But, that kind of experience comes at a cost. They have probably, entered their best 4 or more photos into at least 5 photo competitions per year, over a period of 2-3 years. If we do the math at an average of $25usd per photo that kind of experience is likely to cost well over $1000.

What if I told you that you already have GOLD-winning photos in your collection?

Yes 100%, you already have photos in your collection that have the potential to achieve awards at the highest levels and win the biggest international photo competitions!

How do I know this?

Over the years, I have taught Photoshop to thousands of passionate photographers of all levels, from absolute beginners to experienced professionals.

And the one thing they all have in common is GOLD-worthy photos in their collections.

I bet your wondering, how can absolute beginners and experienced professionals both be at the same level?

You are right; they are not. However, without fail, no matter the skill level I could always find photos with GOLD level potential on the hard drives of every single photographer that I have taught.

Granted, the beginners generally had fewer gold-potential photos than the more experienced photographers; however, regardless of skill or experience, I could always find the diamonds among the rough.

Therefore, I am 100% sure that you too have photos of the highest level in your collection; but, which ones are they?

If you are like me, you probably have 20,000 – 200,000 photos on your hard drives.

And if you have entered a competition before you might know that your favorite photo is often the one the scores the lowest. Just because we like it doesn’t mean it will do well in a photo competition.

We should absolutely take photos to please ourselves, however, to be successful in photo competitions we need to put our emotions aside and choose photos that will please the judges.

Image selection is the most important skill you can learn to winning photo contests.

Not only is selecting the right photos critical to doing well in photo competitions, but it is also the single most important skill in building your reputation as an exceptional photographer.

All photographers of all skill levels have both brilliant and bad photos in their collections. Yes, the more skill and experience the photographer has will generally result in a higher ratio of brilliant over bad images.

That being said, if both the beginners and the best photographers have both brilliant and bad photos to choose from, then there can be no doubt that one of the most important skills in becoming an exceptional photographer is image selection.

In other words, your reputation as a photographer is directly related to the quality of the photos you choose to share.

Having a better understanding of what makes a great photo, along with being more critical and more selective about which photos you share, is likely to elevate your standing as a photographer more than any other skill.

Exceptional photographers only share exceptional photos! (When was the last time your favorite photographer shared a bad photo?)

You will be able to take the knowledge you learn in this course and use it to build a reputation as an exceptional photographer by being more selective and refined about the photos you share.

In this short video course, I will teach you the key criteria that judges tend to favor and show you how to find those winning images within your own photo collection.

Deal ending soon: How to Win Photo Competitions Course at 84% Off

Here is the link to this: CLICK HERE

ALL PHOTOS SHOWN HERE IN THE ARTICLE ARE COPYRIGHTED AND OWNED BY THE AUTHOR: ADAM WILLIAMS.

CREATING INSPIRATIONAL OR SACRED PHOTOS

WHAT TYPE OF PHOTO TOUCHES YOUR HEART?

When we look at certain photos, it is obvious that they can touch your soul somehow. We all have certain photos that stir the soul, and make you think about life, about your future, or even something spiritual, something about God. When I go through this blog, it is obvious that I may present a lot of photos that make me think about God’s existence, such as the photo above. Sometime I think that God created sunsets to remind us that he has something beautiful for all of us to enjoy, especially if we follow him.

Photo by Lanny Cottrell – editor of 123PhotoGo

INSPIRATIONAL PHOTOS WILL CAUSE YOU TO DO SOME SERIOUS THINKING:

That serious thinking is all about your life, and your future. Do you feel your life is worthwhile? What can you do to turn your life around and feel the joy of doing good? There are so many things that photos can really do for you. Have you ever thought of photography as something that can inspire those viewers? Imagine the impact you can have on people’s lives.

NOW ADD AN INSPIRATIONAL THOUGHT TO YOUR PHOTOS:

Both photos by Lanny Cottrell Photography

Here is an example of something you can do with your own photos. Make sure the photo you use has the ability to put a quote on the photo for impact. Sometimes however, the quote you use should be small so you can not only enjoy the quote but the photo too.

MORE IMPACT WILL COME IF YOU HAVE THE QUOTE NOT INTERFERE WITH THE SUBJECT:

In creating your own inspirational photo, find a place on the photo that doesn’t interfere with the subject. The viewer will ponder the message, plus the subject or beauty of the photo. If you want to get good at this type of work, then get real good at using photos that use “minimalism”, which is a photo that has a lot of area around the subject. A course was developed for that. Go here

YOU CAN DEVELOP THE SKILLS TO TOUCH PEOPLE’S LIVES:

You were put on this earth to help people and to reach your highest potential, and to help others reach their potential. This is a way to make that happen. And to use your own photos makes it even better.

Photo by Lanny Cottrell Photography

When looking for a photo to take, think also about the lighting that is available. For example, many people think that a sunset photo will be the most beautiful, but sometimes waiting until twilight will give you a special feeling, and also a place to put a quote.

HOW TO PUT A QUOTE ON A PHOTO:

There are many apps available for putting quotes or anything on photos. I use Amazon Photos, to have all my photos in one place, plus they have in the editing function of the photo, a place to click, and add a text. This works well. If you have Adobe Photoshop, you can also do that there as well (and fix anything you want to do to your photo). I use an app from PicsArt. It seems so easy to just add a text professionally on a photo.

TAKING PHOTOS OF SACRED IMAGES OR STATUES:

Photo by Angelo Pinheiro on Unsplash

Here is my thought on taking photos of sacred images, and buildings, and statues, etc. There are things in some sacred buildings, that you never see photos (or at least hardly see). Such as, one of the most impressive things I saw once was touring a beautiful Catholic church and all around the benches were statues of the 12 Apostles. It really was beautiful, but I have never seen any pictures of them before. Unless you ask someone if it’s alright to take a photo of something sacred, then don’t do it. But, if it’s outside, or designed for tourists to view, then generally, I would think it’s ok. Such as:

Photo by Marites Allen on Unsplash


Holy Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Rome, Italy
Posing someone in the act of prayer is fine. If faces are shown, make sure you get their permission.

CONCLUSION:

This is an art! How you take the photos are something worth studying. But the impressions you make to people are powerful. Lighting is the key, and certain lighting has an effect that other lighting does not have, so study that with photos you can see and study. This is certainly some art form that people enjoy because of the amount of lives you can touch.

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HOW TO MAKE YOUR PHOTOS TRULY UNFORGETTABLE:

photography of sunset
Photo by André Cook on Pexels.com

When you think about a photo that is unforgettable, what kind of photo do you think of? Is it a sunset photo? How about one step further and go with a “twilight photo”. Or is it some person doing something amazing.

There are tricks to make your photos “unforgettable”, and I am going to go over these steps now. I have checked out all those photos that have been classified as “unforgettable” as well, and see if you agree. Don’t these photos just somehow fit the mold?

1- Frame your photo:

This does not mean to physically put your photo in a frame, but as you take a photo, if you have the chance to find something in the foreground or even in the background that can frame around your subject, you will be way ahead. Here are some examples:

daisies in frame
Photo by Ruslan Sikunov on Pexels.com
confident black lady with closed eyes near frame with plants
Photo by Dziana Hasanbekava on Pexels.com
Photo by Gable Denims

2- Movement in your photo:

When shooting something that has motion or movement with it, allow the subject to have something to move into.  For example, this would be better if the subject was not in the center.  If something was moving, have some area in the frame of the photo to move into.  See examples:

people woman jump show
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
Photo by Seth Sanchez

3– Direction:

Our brain perceives information from left to right, so it’s best to position all the important stuff in the right side of the frame. Examples:

Photo by Elliot Kuhn
Photo by Alexander Hanji
Photo by Ramil Sitdikov

4- TRY A DIFFERENT CAMERA ANGLE:

Try taking photos from a different angle.  Instead of taking pictures standing up, get down to the level of the subject, if it’s a pet or child.  You will find a different story to your photo:

Photo by Matteo De Santis
Photo by Miguel Angel Aguirre
Photo by Tom

5- TRY SHOOTING WITH “NEGATIVE SPACE”

There are two spaces in every image:

  • positive space (it shows the main subject);
  • negative space (usually it’s the background).

Don’t forget to keep an eye on what is happening in the negative space; you want it to emphasize your main subject, not cramp it.

Photo courtesy of Photography talk.com
Photo by Mohammed Bager

A great blog or article on “negative space” has been done before. Check out this article HERE to learn more.

6- GIVE YOUR PHOTOS “DEPTH”

Depth will give your shot a more three-dimensional and rich feel. There are few features that can help you achieve it:

  • parallel lines, which come to one point in the distance;
  • gradually dissolving fog will make your photo seem layered;
  • tone (volume is transmitted through color: darker objects appear closer, and lighter objects appear farther away);
  • depth of field (if you blur the background, clear objects will appear closer, while fuzzy objects will seem more distant).
Photo by Bas Lammers
Photo by Bas Lammers
Photo by Bas Lammers

7- HIGHLIGHT THE “FOREGROUND”

When taking a scenic shot, that has depth, add something in the foreground.  If you add something in the foreground, your viewers will feel like they can relate to the size and depth of the picture more.

Photo by Bas Lammers
Photo by Murad Osman
a beautiful yellow pea flower
Photo by Batitay Japheth on Pexels.com

8- Watch for shadows and reflections to make your photo amazing:

Use these elements to make your picture more interesting and dramatic. You can create a visual ’dialogue’ between the subject and its reflection (shadow).

Photo by Anna Atkina
trees near body of water
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
panoramic view of city lit up at night
Photo by Amar Saleem on Pexels.com

9- Take photos during the “golden hour” or the “blue hour”

The “Golden Hour” is my favorite time to shoot.  It is the one hour before sunset.  The colors have gone to a golden color in the sky and the colors everywhere are a nice warm golden hue.  It really warms things up and makes things very pleasant.

GOLDEN HOUR:

macro photography of pink flowers
Photo by Ray Bilcliff on Pexels.com
Photo by Lanny Cottrell – Editor of 123Photogo

BLUE HOUR:

This is the time when the sun has set, or just before the sun comes up.  The light is predominately blue.  Check it out:  This is often called twilight:

Photo by Joe Penniston
Photo by Lanny Cottrelll – Editor of 123Photogo

CONCLUSION:

There are many ideas that you can use to create an unforgettable photo. Study these ideas shown here, and go make some unforgettable photos.

Want to share your photos? Check this out:

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RECENT PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS

A Frosty Morning ~
© Trudy L. Smuin

There are many contests out there. And fun to enter. This particular photo contest is from the organization: BETTER PHOTO.COM. They had some amazing photos that inspire me, and hopefully you to take more pictures that are around us:

The March 2022 photography contest at BetterPhoto is fun, prestigious, and inspiring. Grand Prize this month goes to ‘~ A Frosty Morning ~’ in the March 2022 photo theme. Each month, we offer new photo challenges, assignments, and themes to spark photographic creativity.

Nautilus Shells
© Carolyn M. Fletcher
Just Another Tulip
© Christine Greenspan
Proud American
© Terry Cervi
Old Church in France
© Christine Czernin
End of a hot hot day
© Christian HARDOUIN

That’s all the grand prize and 1st place winners today. Have you ever thought of entering a photo contest. This is one way to greatly improve your photography.

Check this out so understand why contests are so valuable: CLICK HERE

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Here is one more link to show you some other winning photos: CLICK NOW

MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY SUBJECT IDEAS:

blade of grass blur bright close up
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

One of the most thrilling parts of photography is MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY! I have learned to love macro photography ever since I stuck some close-up filters on the front of my lens. It brought me to a whole new world.

Today, I want to present some amazing fun ideas for macro photography. These are ideas and tips of things to photograph, but not how to do macro photography. If you want to learn how to do basic macro photography, click here: https://123photogo.com/2021/10/22/tips-on-macro-still-photography/

IDEA # 1 – CUTLERY

Taking photos of cutlery is an interesting idea, but, with the proper lighting, and the unique designs found on cutlery, you have a winning idea here.

Shun Santoku knife

IDEA # 2 – FEATHERS

This is a fun and interesting idea. We see feathers all the time on the ground, on a tree, or wherever. But have you really looked at them close? They are an amazing subject:

Peacock feather

IDEA #3 – WATER DROPLETS:

This one is a classic, but be creative, and find your water on unusual surfaces like a wire fence, a cobweb, or a rear-view mirror. Early morning dew makes almost any subject magical. In the spring or fall, your can look for frost instead of dew.

Water drops with reflections.

IDEA #4 – GLASS:

Close up photos of fine crystal glassware can yield wonderful abstracts filled with curved lines and reflections. For added fun, place glasses side by side, or one behind the other to create lines where they overlap. You can fill the glasses with colored water for even more creative images. Finally, you can add a sheet of clear, but textured glass (available for purchase at stained glass craft stores) in front of your glassware. The possibilities are endless.

Stained glass windows

IDEA #5 – FOIL REFLECTIONS:

Now when I hear about this idea, I thought about this carefully. Why? And then I saw some examples and then asked: Why not? Use a variety of different color lights to enhance your creation.

IDEA # 6- FRUITS AND VEGETABLES:

This is something that could be easy, but, I think it would be more fun, if you “posed” the fruit or vegetables. Don’t just go up to the item and snap, but, pose them like for a still photo.

Pose your fruits and vegetables. The photo is much more interesting that way.

I had a whole blog on taking photos of fruits and vegetables. Check this out: https://123photogo.com/2021/06/05/tips-on-photographing-your-favorite-fruit-or-vegetable/

ITEM #7 – RUST AND PEELING PAINT:

Fascinating rust patterns can be found on an old car, or even a metal garbage can in the park. Peeling paint graces old fences and walls. Most people pass by such items without a second glance. Not you! Break out your macro lens, and reveal the hidden beauty. Just beware of harsh shadows if you’re photographing in bright sunlight.

IDEA #8 – CAR DETAILS:

The sleek lines of shiny chrome and trim on a polished car can provide hours of photographic entertainment. You can photograph your own car, but don’t be shy about taking your camera to an antique car show. Car owners are usually proud of their vehicles and won’t mind you photographing the details.

IDEA #9 – ANIMAL BITS

The texture of fur on your dog or the wrinkled skin of an elephant at the zoo can make a great close up shot. Paws, claws and teeth are fun, too, as long as you keep out of harm’s way. Finally, eyes always make compelling subjects. Shoot close ups of the eyes of your dog or cat (or a person!).

Animal fur, and the detail

IDEA #10 – INSECTS

The amazing small world of insects. So unique when you get up close. They could even look scary if you got close enough. Try this:

There are some special things you need to know to take pictures of insects. For further information go to: https://123photogo.com/2021/07/08/learn-how-to-take-pictures-of-insects/

IDEA #11 – FLOWERS:

Of course I have a blog I have done on flower photography. Just learn the details of great flower photography here: https://123photogo.com/2021/05/20/ideas-of-how-to-take-the-best-flower-photos/


This is a new series of articles we will be doing, to give you different ideas with different subjects to help you with your photography ideas.

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A GUIDE TO MINIMALIST PHOTOGRAPHY:

Photo by Jan Huber on Unsplash

Minimalist photography seems to be an art that has taken off lately. And I am one that really likes this type of photography. This is a simple photo to do, as well as very attractive to those looking at the photo.

What is minimalist photography, and how can you capture stunning minimalist photos?

Minimalism is a popular artistic technique, and it’s a great way to spice up your images. (It’s also a good way to generate lots of attention on social media.) But beginners often struggle to get to grips with minimalism, which is where this article comes in handy.

WHAT IS MINIMALIST PHOTOGRAPHY?

Minimalist photography, also known as minimalism photography, is a type of image-making that relies on simplistic compositions, heavy use of empty space, and elimination of clutter.

Thanks to their simplicity, minimalistic photos often have a characteristically meditative effect:

Note that minimalist photos generally feature some form of main subject (e.g., the boat in the image above). But subject presence is kept to a minimum; here, minimalist photographers often zoom out for a small-in-the-frame subject surrounded by empty space.

Some photographers are pure minimalists, choosing to capture images that are as simple as possible (e.g., a single tree surrounded by white snow). But other photographers incorporate minimalistic elements into their work alongside non-minimalistic elements. Either approach is fine – just do what feels right!

Key elements of minimalist photography:

Minimalism can be applied to pretty much every genre of photography, including portrait, landscape, still life, architecture, and even street shooting. But minimalist photos do have a few key characteristics:

  • Negative space. Minimalist photos tend to feature lots of empty, or negative, space. Negative space is composed of expanses of pure color or texture, such as a broad stretch of ocean or a grassy lawn. (And featureless white skies are a minimalist staple!)
  • A small main subject. Minimalist compositions keep the subject small in the frame so that they’re dwarfed by negative space. As I discuss below, this can be done with a wide-angle lens or by shooting from a distance. In cases where the main subject isn’t small in the frame, it should be exceptionally simple (e.g., a few streaks of paint on a wall).
  • Limited clutter. Minimalism emphasizes simplicity, and minimalist photos tend to feature a main subject, lots of empty space, and nothing else. Minimalist photographers carefully refine their compositions until no extra elements – such as poles or telephone lines in the background – exist. The more clutter you can eliminate from your shots, the more minimalist they’ll be.

If you like, you can look at the above list as a recipe for minimalist photos. As long as you include all three items, you’ll end up with a decent minimalist shot – and as you become more familiar with minimalist compositions, your results will become more and more powerful.

Photo by Mads Schmidt Rasmussen on Unsplash

TIPS TO WATCH FOR WHEN SHOOTING MINIMALIST PHOTOS:

As I have been looking at photos that I think are the best minimalist photos, I was surprised to find out that most people follow these rules:

  • A wide field of view
  • Plenty of distance between yourself and your subject

ONE THING PHOTOGRAPHERS MISS IN MINIMALISM:

The rules of composition are often missed in minimalist photos. I went through quite a few photos where the subject was right in the middle of the frame. I found no artistic value to this, mostly because it is just so much static to a photo when the subject is right in the middle. PLEASE! use the RULE OF THIRDS, when taking photos with minimalism. See: https://123photogo.com/2021/11/12/rules-of-photography/

NEGATIVE SPACE

Another meaning for minimalist photography is “Negative Space”. As you will notice the one thing that you need to accomplish the minimalism, is to find a lot of space around the subject. I have put an article like that together already. Check this out: https://123photogo.com/2021/11/01/understanding-negative-space/

Here are just a few photos I have found that bring out the best ideas in Minimalist photography:

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