THE TWO BIGGEST REASONS PHOTOGRAPHERS FAIL

THE SINGLE BIGGEST REASON PHOTOGRAPHERS FAIL:

I have worked in a photo store before, for almost 20 years.  I have seen people come and go.  I have also seen those people try to do photography as a profession.  They have tried to be a wedding photographer.

Photo by:  hypop.com.au

But, after finding the struggles of working with people, worrying about making the client happy, worrying if you are a good enough photographer, they give up after a year or so of trying that. 

So, maybe the next thing to try is being a more freelance photographer and take these wonderful pictures of landscapes and scenery for a living:

Photo by:  dreamstime.com

Then, after taking a series of, what seemed like pretty good landscape photos, you started comparing your photos to the ones you see in a magazine, and they just don’t compare.  Or you also find that it is hard to find a place to sell your photos.   So, you give up on that one.  But, wait !  

There are photographers who seem to do really well doing wildlife photos. 

Photo by:  greatinspire.com

Now, you find out that to do this type of photography takes special lenses, tripods, and a different world to get the good photos.  The zoo just is not the place to get the right kind of pictures. 

Is anybody getting where I am headed with this?  You are right.  This is actually a very typical story of a lot of photographers who bought their camera, hoping to make some money with their photography.  Why can’t they make money taking pictures with their camera?

There are 2 reasons people don’t make money with their cameras:

  1.  They don’t have the patience they need to do it.

If people would just stick with it.  If they would just “keep on keeping on”.  They quit too soon.  Success doesn’t come quickly.   And practice makes perfect. 

I am going to tell as story about my blog that I do several times a week.  I started doing this blog on August 3rd, 2015.  What is my dream about this blog?  To have hundreds of thousands of photographers, beginners and professionals from all over the world read this blog regularly.  I remember my first week.  I did only 1 per week.  Then I did 2 a week, as I got more creative.  After a month I had 10 people viewing my blog.  I thought it would take forever to get any kind of readership.   Am I on my way to success after a year and a half?  I hope I am getting there.  I have had some successes.  I am not where I want to be, but, I am not giving up.  Here are some stats as of today: 

Take a look at my Facebook website:  https://www.facebook.com/123photogo/

9,181 people (as of this writing) currently follow me on my Facebook website. 

I have posted recently an article titled:  “The Art of Black And White”  .  Just that one article alone, had over 6,000 views.  I am not bragging, I am just stating that I have not given up, and I am not giving up.  I will achieve my goal, and going to be a place where photographers like to come for entertainment and for learning.  In a few years, we may post results again to see how far I have grown.  

2- People fail to keep learning as they go, or learn from their mistakes.

As I was mentioning about the failing photographer above, one of the reasons the photographer failed, is that they weren’t taking the time to keep improving themselves.  This is an industry that involves self-teaching every day.  When I want to get good at something, I subscribe to magazines, read books, read articles, find websites, do what I can to learn everything I can myself.  I had a retail store that sold electronics goods for about 8 to 10 years.  I had my staff learn that way as well, and often we would have the company rep come in to teach us their product line.  Sometimes we were more well trained than the company rep.  We got so that we did not have the sales rep come in anymore because we were more well trained ourselves than the sales reps.  We knew how to succeed in that store, and we did.  It was a smooth running, smooth successful store. 

SO, IF YOU WANT TO SUCCEED IN PHOTOGRAPHY:  DON’T GIVE UP, AND STAY FOCUSED ON LEARNING AS YOU FAIL. 

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THE MOST BEAUTIFUL PLACES IN THE WORLD TO SEE SPRING FLOWERS

Most Incredible Destinations to See Spring Flowers

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK:

Photo by: istock

Chase away the winter blues with a blast of vibrant colors. You have plenty of options whether your in a city or the countryside with picturesque botanic gardens, otherworldly festivals and huge fields of flamboyant wildflowers. Warmer temperatures are already melting the last signs of the gray winter, sending more people outside. Flowers have an immediate impact on happiness and a long-term positive effect on moods, according to science.

Photo by:  Shutterstock

Antelope Valley, California

As of March 17, the poppies have started blooming on the east half of the park. They suddenly exploded into color in just one week, and can even be seen from across the valley. The peak is expected in late March/early April, according to California State Parks. This western edge of the Mojave Desert northeast of Los Angeles is one of the last places where you can see whole hillsides covered in the spectacular state flower of the aptly named Golden State.

Photo by:  istock

Crested Butte, Colorado

 
The Alpine Loop Scenic Byway offers a wide range of spring wildflowers. You’ll see areas of red, pink, yellow, blue, purple, and white flowers covering the meadows like a colorful blanket. Whether you drive along the roads or walk, be sure to look for the beautiful Colorado blue columbine. The Crested Butte has been known as the “Wildflower Capital” of the state. There, you will also find stunning yellow sunflowers, purple delphiniums, lupines, and death camas, which are a kind of lily flower. The annual Wildflower Festival this year is July 7-16.

Photo by:   Brooklyn Botanic Garden/Antonio M. Rosaio

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden

 
The Brooklyn Botanic Garden has been labeled one of New York City’s greatest treasures. It has at least 20 different gardens, pavilions, exhibits, collections, and even museums. The lilacs are especially popular in April and May when their scent fills up the air. In late April, the bluebells burst into flowers and create a captivating woodland spectacle. The tree peonies and their marvelous aroma bloom in April and May as well.

Photo by:   Shutterstock
Furano, Japan
 
Lavender has been cultivated in Hokkaido for more than half a century, according to Japan Guide. Furano’s lavender fields attract thousands of visitors to the region every year. The majority of lavender usually starts blooming in late June and reaches its peak from around mid-July to early August. Other kinds of flowers that lure tourists in June are rape blossoms, poppies and lupins.

Photo by: Shutterstock
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
 
This national park, the most visited one in the country, has more than 1,500 different kinds of flowers, the most in the country. That’s why its nickname is the “Wildflower National Park.” You can find orchids, violets, trilliums, and crested dwarf irises all over if you go in the spring in April. The park hosts the Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage (April 11-15), a festival of programs and guided walks and hikes that explore the wondrous diversity of life in the park, according to NPS.

Photo by:  National Cherry Blossom Festival

Cherry Blossom Festival, Washington, D.C.

 
The “nation’s greatest springtime celebration” is in the nation’s capital. The tradition started in 1912 when the mayor of Tokyo gave 3,000 cherry trees to the U.S. as a sign of friendship. Some of the favorite events during the event are the Blossom Kite Festival and the parade down Constitution Avenue, which also happens to be one of the largest displays in the country. This year’s event lasts until April 16.

Photo by:  istock

Lupines in New Hampshire

 
The lupines of Sugar Hill are known all over the country. Imagine yellow, red, white and all kinds of wildflowers amid the beautiful purple lupines while hearing birds and butterflies hover around with mountains ranges in the background. The state pays homage to this captivating wildflower with the Fields of Lupine Festival, now known as the Celebration of Lupine, every year.

Photo by:  Carissa K. / Yelp
Bartram’s Garden, Pennsylvania
The garden, the oldest living botanic garden in the U.S., is just one reason why Philadelphia is a must-visit city in 2017. The 45-acre National Historic Landmark is a destination and an outdoor classroom as well as a living laboratory that is visited by more than 40,000 people every year. Admission is free. The garden features a wildflower meadow, river trail, wetland and farm buildings, and they offer tours.

Photo by:  Shutterstock
Cape Floral Kingdom, South Africa
Inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2004, the property at the south-western extremity of South Africa is one of the world’s great centers of terrestrial biodiversity, according to UNESCO. The region includes national parks, nature reserves, wilderness areas, state forests, and mountain catchment areas. It is recognized as one of the most special places for plants in the world.

Photo by:  Laila Wessel/Photo courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden

Missouri Botanical Garden’s Orchid Show

If you want to see more than 7,500 orchid plans, representing more than 2,500 unique orchid taxa, in the same place, visit the Missouri Botanical Garden. The show’s last day is March 26. You’ll also find roses and a tropical rainforest in the Climatron conservatory. The garden is also known for its amazing collections of magnolias, camellias and daylilies.

 

 

Photo by:  istock

Keukenhof, Netherlands

Sure, most people go to see the Tulips Fields outside Amsterdam, one of the most colorful places on Earth and a “museum” of the most beautiful sights in the entire country. But the “Garden of Europe,” or Keukenhof Park, is worth a visit. It is one of the most beautiful spring gardens in the world. There are more than 7 million bulbs and around 800 varieties of tulips.

 

 Photo by:  istock

Tulip Fest, Oregon

Portland is known as the “City of Roses” but you can enjoy a sea of tulips just a half hour away during the annual Tulip Festival (March 24-April 30). You can find more than 40 acres covered with the beautiful spring bulbs at the Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm. The Rose Festival and its Grand Floral Parade are equally mesmerizing


Photo by:  Shutterstock
Bluebonnets in Texas
You know how everything is bigger in Texas? Flowers are no exception. The bluebonnets are more than 12 inches tall, so it’s no wonder they are Texans’ favorite. Drive around Hill Country to see the mighty flowers anywhere you turn. There is even a designated Bluebonnet Trail in Ennis from April 1-30.Explore the more than 40 miles of mapped driving routes – the oldest such trails known in the state.

Photo by:  istock

Giverny Monet’s Garden, France

April is the time to go to see stunning daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, daisies, myosotis, and cherry blossoms. The popular Giverny Monet’s Garden, which includes the iconic Water Garden, opens on March 24. This is where the famous Japanese bridge is, covered with wisterias. Other smaller bridges, weeping willows, a bamboo wood, and water lillies which bloom all summer long can also be seen. The land in the Clos Normand is divided into flowerbeds where flower clumps of different heights create volume.

 

Photo by:  flickr/ happy /CC by 4.0

Ashikaga Flower Park, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan

This is where you’ll go to see stunning wisteria, or fuji flowers. Ashikaga Flower Park features lots of blue, white and pink fuji, as well as yellow laburnum that look like yellow colored fuji, according to Japan Guide. One large fuji tree is a century old and its branches are supported to create a huge umbrella of blue fuji flowers.

And there you have 16 of the most beautiful places in the world to take photos of spring flowers.  Do you live close to any of these?  Perhaps you could visit these places. 

 
ARTICLE BY:  THE ACTIVE TIMES AND WRITTEN BY:
HRISTINA BYRNES

TODAY’S SPECIAL:  BETTER PHOTO BASICS, PLUS BOOKS ON HOW TO TAKE BETTER PHOTOS OF FLOWERS AND CLOSE-UP PHOTOGRAPHY,  CLICK THE LINK BELOW FOR SPECIAL OFFERS:

 
 
 
 
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