PHOTOS OF THE WEEK FOCUSES ON THE US’s NATIONAL MONUMENTS !

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A NATIONAL PARK AND A NATIONAL MONUMENT?

This week’s Photos of the Week, focuses on the US’s

National Monuments.

There are National Parks in the United States, such as Yellowstone National Park, Arches National Park,

And many others.   So, what is the difference between a National Park vs.  a National Monument? 

There are a combination of reasons, but first and foremost in the United States is the legal way in which a national park and a national monument are established. National Parks are established through acts of Congress while National Monuments can be established by the President at his discretion.

I would like to put it in more easy to understand terms:  A national monument, once designated by the President of the United States, is not necessarily a park, and thus, may not have the public access that a National Park has. And a lot of times the monuments may be established to protect the area from further development and roads into the area.  Although the area may be just as beautiful as something you would see in a National Park, it may not ever have the access to it like a Park. 

So, with that understanding, let’s take a look at some National Monuments that are maybe hard to get to, that are just amazingly beautiful areas, that you would not normally be able to see, because they are not easily accessible.

By U.S. Department of the Interior – 9375, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=45403453

Secretary Jewell & Director of the Bureau of Land Management Neil Kornze Joins Nevadans to Celebrate Designation of Basin and Range National Monument Designation preserves stunning landscapes, ancient rock art; protects existing ranching, military and recreation uses

This view is looking north along Utah Highway 261 toward the Bears Ears. Natural Bridges National Monument is to the left of the image.

By Bureau of Land Management – Browns Canyon National Monument, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=41521469

The Browns Canyon National Monument in Colorado will protect a stunning section of Colorado’s upper Arkansas River Valley. Located in Chaffee County near the town of Salida, Colorado, the 21,586-acre monument features rugged granite cliffs, colorful rock outcroppings, and mountain vistas that are home to a diversity of plants and wildlife, including bighorn sheep and golden eagles. Members of Congress, local elected officials, conservation advocates, and community members have worked for more than a decade to protect the area, which hosts world-class recreational opportunities that attract visitors from around the globe for hiking, whitewater rafting, hunting and fishing. In addition to supporting this vibrant outdoor recreation economy, the designation will protect the critical watershed and honor existing water rights and uses, such as grazing and hunting. The monument will be cooperatively managed by the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management and USDA’s National Forest Service. Learn more: www.blm.gov/co/st/en/fo/rgfo/browns_canyon_national.html Photos by Bob Wick, BLM

islands and rocks of California Coastal National Monument: This monument ensures the protection of all islets, reefs and rock outcroppings from the coast of California to a distance of 12 nautical miles (22 km), along the entire 840-mile (1,350 km) long California coastline.[28]

By Edward S. Curtis – REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USACALL NUMBER: LOT 12311 [item] [P&P]REPRODUCTION NUMBER:LC-USZC4-11256 (color film copy transparency)LC-USZ62-116676 (b&w film copy neg.)LC-USZ62-54704 (b&w film copy neg. of photogravure)No known restrictions on publication.DIGITAL ID:(color film copy transparency) cph 3g11256 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g11256(b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c16676 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c16676(b&w film copy neg. of photogravure) cph 3b02607 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b02607NOTES:H52434 U.S. Copyright Office.Title devised by Library staff.Curtis no. 1013.Copyright 1904 by E.S. Curtis.Forms part of: Edward S. Curtis Collection (Library of Congress).Published in: The North American Indian / Edward S. Curtis. [Seattle, Wash.] : Edward S. Curtis, 1907-30, suppl. v. 1, pl. 28., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=179645

E. S. Curtis (1904): Canon de Chelly – Navajo. Seven riders on horseback and dog trek against background of canyon cliffs. Located within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation, it preserves the valleys and rims of the canyons of de Chelly, del Muerto, and Monument, all of which are Navajo Tribal Trust Lands.[29]

By Averette at en.wikipedia, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4078969

A natural amphitheater canyon similar to formations at Bryce Canyon National Park, it stretches over 3 miles (4.8 km) and is more than 2,000 feet (610 m) deep.[40]

The tower is a monolithic igneous intrusion of volcanic neck rising dramatically 1,267 feet (386 m) above the surrounding terrain. Proclaimed by Theodore Roosevelt, this was the first national monument.[3]

By Jason Hickey – originally posted to Flickr as Giant sequoia, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6191369

The monument includes 38 of the 39 giant sequoia groves in the Sequoia National Forest, amounting to about half of the sequoia groves currently in existence. This includes one of the ten largest giant sequoias, the Boole Tree. Its two parts are around Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks.[66]

Preserving 1,900,000 acres (7,700 km2), the monument consists of the Grand Staircase, Utah,  the Kaiparowits Plateau, and the Canyons of the Escalante. It is notable for its paleontological finds and geology, and it was the first monument to be maintained by the Bureau of Land Management.[73]

By Zarxos at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3516860

Located within the Tongass National Forest, Alaska, and called The Yosemite of the North for its similar geology, it also contains the Quartz Hill molybdenum deposit, possibly the largest such mineral deposit in the world. Throughout the monument is light-colored granite, about 50 to 70 million years old (Eocene Epoch to Cretaceous Period), that has been sculpted by glaciers that gouged deep U-shaped troughs.

By Lyn Topinka – CVO Photo Archive Mount St. Helens, Washington Before, During, and After 18 May 1980., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3158771

Following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, this area was set aside for research, recreation, and education. The environment is left to respond naturally to the disturbance

Utah Rainbow Arch: Rainbow Bridge is one of the world’s largest natural bridges. It stands 290 feet (88 m) tall and spans 275 feet (84 m) wide; the top of the bridge is 42 feet (13 m) thick and 33 feet (10 m) wide. It was made from sandstone formed during the Triassic and the Jurassic periods.

By Larry D. Moore, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27852042

The Waco Mammoth National Monument is a paleontological site and museum in Waco, Texas, United States where fossils of twenty-four Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and other mammals from the Pleistocene Epoch have been uncovered. The site is the largest known concentration of a single herd of mammoths dying from the same event, which is believed to have been a flash flood. A local partnership developed around the site after the initial bone was discovered.

THIS IS JUST A SMALL SAMPLING OF SOME OF THE MANY US NATIONAL MONUMENTS THAT HAVE BEEN DESIGNATED AS MONUMENTS.  THESE ARE JUST SOME OF THE ONES THAT I FELT ARE JUST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, ALTHOUGH THERE ARE STILL SOME I COULD ADD TO THIS PHOTOGRAPHIC LIST, FOR SURE.  SO I WOULD REFER YOU TO:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_National_Monuments_of_the_United_States

HERE YOU WILL FIND A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL THE MONUMENTS, WHERE THEY ARE LOCATED, AND WHEN THEY WERE DESIGNATED AS NATIONAL MONUMENTS.  I WOULD SAY, HOWEVER, AT LEAST THE ONES I HAVE LISTED ABOVE, HAVE THE POTENTIAL OF BEING SOME OF THE BEST, MOST PHOTOGENIC OF THE NATIONAL MONUMENTS.  SO, IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR SOMEPLACE DIFFERENT TO TAKE PICTURES THIS YEAR, MAYBE LOOK INTO SOME OF THESE REMOTE NATIONAL MONUMENTS, INSTEAD OF THE NATIONAL PARKS FOR SOME BEAUTIFUL PHOTOGRAPHIC OPPURTUNITIES. 

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DO YOU LOVE TO TAKE PICTURES, JUST ANY TIME OF THE DAY?

Monday, February 13, 2017 DO YOU LOVE TO TAKE PICTURES, JUST ANY TIME OF THE DAY? SOME OF YOU ARE PROBABLY LIKE ME:  YOU JUST WANT TO TAKE PICTURES ALMOST ALL DAY LONG, BUT WORK, AND OTHER C…

Source: DO YOU LOVE TO TAKE PICTURES, JUST ANY TIME OF THE DAY?

DO YOU LOVE TO TAKE PICTURES, JUST ANY TIME OF THE DAY?

 

Monday, February 13, 2017

DO YOU LOVE TO TAKE PICTURES, JUST ANY TIME OF THE DAY?

SOME OF YOU ARE PROBABLY LIKE ME:  YOU JUST WANT TO TAKE PICTURES ALMOST ALL DAY LONG, BUT WORK, AND OTHER COMMITMENTS JUST GET IN THE WAY, AND THEN WHEN YOU THINK YOU HAVE A FEW MINUTES, YOU LOOK OUTSIDE AND THE WEATHER OR THE CONDITIONS ARE JUST AWFUL!  THEN YOU ARE THINKING:  “HOW CAN I EVER BE A SUCCESSFUL PHOTOGRAPHER”?

THIS IS WHEN THE REAL GOOD PHOTOGRAPHERS DON’T GIVE UP.  THEY WILL TAKE A LOOK AT THE CONDITIONS THEY ARE IN, AND JUST MOVE FORWARD WITH WHAT THEY HAVE.  I FEEL REAL FORTUNATE RIGHT NOW BECAUSE I HAVE A WEATHERPROOF CAMERA AND NO MATTER HOW BAD IT IS OUTSIDE, I CAN GO OUTSIDE AND JUST CONTINUE TO TAKE PICTURES.  NOT ALL PEOPLE HAVE THAT LUXURY.  I WANT TO RECOMMEND THAT IF YOU ARE LIKE ME, THAT MAYBE THAT SHOULD BE IN YOUR BAG OF TOOLS.  GET A GOOD ONE, ONE THAT WAS MADE BY A CAMERA MANUFACTURE, SO THAT THE LENS IS SHARP, YOU HAVE OPTIONS ON THE MODES, AND YOU CAN PICK WHAT TYPE OF PHOTOGRAPHY YOU CAN DO WITH THAT CAMERA.

I CURRENTLY OWN A PENTAX WEATHERPROOF CAMERA AND HAVE BEEN DELIGHTED BY IT’S RESULTS.  I AM GOING TO PUT UP A LINK FOR YOU FOR WHICH YOU CAN PURCHASE THROUGH THIS WEBSITE A CAMERA OR AT LEAST LOOK AT THEM AND SEE IF THIS IS SOMETHING YOU MIGHT WANT TO CONSIDER:
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ADAPTING TO WEATHER AND TIME OF DAY AS A PHOTOGRAPHER

By Wayne Turner:
Have you ever been in the position where your shutter finger is just itching to take some photos? You look outside and the weather is overcast and the sun is nowhere to be found. Take heart; you don’t always need the sun. Here’s why.
photo by Tuncay

I was always lead to believe that if there was no sun, then there wasn’t an opportunity for good photography. So during the winter months and overcast summer or spring days I had to find another hobby, or so I thought. That’s not true and I’ll show you why.

1.  SHOOTING OUTDOORS ON OVERCAST DAYS:

If you’ve never tried it, then go out and do it. You’ll be surprised at the photos you take. Why? Because the clouds act as one big filter resulting in a soft and even light. The harsh shadows you sometimes see in your sunny day images are just not there. There’s no glare in the subject’s eyes and it can look as if the photo has been taken by a professional.

Check that your white balance is set to cloudy if you aren’t shooting on automatic. Although you get really good photos on a cloudy day, it is more suited for smaller scenes, close-ups and portraits. Landscapes don’t do that well on cloudy days.

2. SUNNY DAYS:

Bright sunny days are not always the best time to take good photos. Too much bright light can be a bad thing so you need to know what time of day is best. When it’s sunny you’d probably find that around midday is not the best time to shoot any images. The lighting is directly from above and very harsh.
Shadows fall below the eyes in a portrait and can result in an ugly image. Unless you’re looking for very specific lighting effects for buildings and similar subjects, don’t shoot between 11am and 1pm.

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photo by Catrin Austin
Early to mid-morning and late afternoon are the best times for shooting on sunny days. Lighting is from the side, the contrast is great, and the atmosphere created by light that is more golden is amazing.

Besides shooting sunsets and sunrises, virtually any type of image will look great. A key here is to use bright shade for portraits and other people shots. It gives the same effect as a cloudy day.

3. SHOOTING INDOORS:

There is no bad time when shooting indoors, as you always have control of the light when using flash or strobes. But flash isn’t the greatest light to shoot by even if you do have total control. Using available natural light will always give you a great image. So what’s the best way? Find a place inside with a large window that allows a good amount of light to enter the room.

Place your subject in the area where most of this light falls. If you find that the opposite side of the subject is too dark, use a reflector which, can be a large piece of card, a white board, or a bed sheet draped just outside the view of the camera lens. Experiment to find the best subject placement. Sometimes the darker side of the image will make the overall image really stunning.


So, there’s always a time to take an image, and key to this is make the best possible use of available light. You may not be able to shoot the image you have in mind but you’ll still be able to create an image that’s stunning. You won’t necessarily get it right the first time; be prepared to experiment and try different placements and angles, and I can assure you that you’ll come up with something great.

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About the Author: Wayne Turner has been teaching photography for 25 years and has written three books on photography. He has produced 21 Steps to Perfect Photos; a program of learner-based training using outcomes based education.

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