PHOTOS OF THE WEEK INCLUDE A BEAUTIFUL PORTRAIT OF 2 CHILDREN

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK:

January 12th, 2017

THIS WEEK’S PHOTOS OF THE WEEK COME FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD.  AND

I THINK THEY ARE AMAZING.  WHY BABBLE ON, BUT, LET’S GET RIGHT TO IT.

THEY ARE WORTH SHARING, SO, PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU SHARE

THEM WITH ALL YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY.

Portrait of the week:

Photo by Lisa Holloway

It is always precious to see siblings get together and bond.  And it is even better when the photographer captures that bond in a portrait like this.  This, you can see is one of those rare moments

when you can tell that there is a special love between the two.  Congratulations to Lisa for capturing

this special moment in this portrait. It is amazing.

Lisa Holloway has her own portrait business in Las Vegas Nevada.  To see more of her great

work or to even have Lisa get involved in your portrait, check out her website at:

Photo by: Philippe Denis

Ahh, I love a good black and white photo that wins in “Photos of the Week”.  Just to show you that B&W is not a dying art.  But, check this out !  What an amazing photo!  Now, I am guessing it is really cold and windy there.  That is called catching that at just the right time.  I wonder if you were there, would you be too cold to pull out your camera to capture that image?  Well, it’s a winner, don’t you think?

Photo by:  Alexandra Bechtle > Photo&Art , Pic&Lifetime

You know I have seen a lot of pictures of hippos, but not like this!!  This makes this photo amazing with the capture of this hippo with all the birds getting a ride like this.  As we know, there is

probably a lot of bugs on the back of that hippo, and that is why so many birds, but, what

a great picture. 

This photo was also added to:  GEORGE VAN VUUREN WILDLIFE AND LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY.

Livigno
Italia
— with Kenny H. Dzanay.

Not an easy photo to capture.  Night photography of a ski slope, I believe, and the lights of this little town, make this an amazing shot.  It is a difficult photo to take but this is done so well.  Congratulations to this photographer who took the time to get it right.

Photo by:  Steve Mc Curry.

This is just a great photo of the railway workers in India.  So many of us think that railroads exist in other countries, and it is such a great capture of history and to see this well composed photo of the workers, and the beautiful background, certainly makes for a great photo.

Photographer unknown, but posted in the group:  PHOTOGRAPHERS WITHOUT BORDERS
Fishing with a friend.  What country?  Unknown, but definitely a 3rd world country.  But,
I find the picture moving, and glad to see these two boys having a good time.  Fishing is
about as good as it gets to most people.  Just these little fish, but, most people find it fun
anyway.  The composition of the photo is perfect, plus it tells a great story.  Check out
other great photos by going to that group on Facebook.
 
 

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2 THINGS BEGINNING PHOTOGRAPHERS SHOULD LEARN FIRST:

So you want some digital photography tips that work quickly and are easy? “Wind N’ Sea” captured by Eric May Well, it’s not that hard to start getting good at photography. It’s like playing an inst…

Source: 2 THINGS BEGINNING PHOTOGRAPHERS SHOULD LEARN FIRST:

2 THINGS BEGINNING PHOTOGRAPHERS SHOULD LEARN FIRST:

So you want some digital photography tips that work quickly and are easy?

“Wind N’ Sea” captured by Eric May

Well, it’s not that hard to start getting good at photography. It’s like playing an instrument. Anybody can get to a decent level, but those who are very dedicated and put their natural talent to use are the ones who become great. I will try to show you how to become great.
2 THINGS BEGINNING PHOTOGRAPHERS SHOULD LEARN FIRST:
By Al Sanchez
  1. Ultimate Control Over Your Camera and Equipment
  2. Compositional Expertise
Experts have these two down pat, and you as a beginner must try to develop these areas of expertise as best as you can. When expert photographers take photos, they spend very little time composing a shot. Instead, they focus their attention more on the message, the style, and what they want the photo to do to the viewer. That’s art!

Until you get to that level, master these two aspects of photography.

TECHNICAL EXPERTISE:

 

This may be the easiest part of photography. It’s kind of like math. You must understand what exposure, aperture, shutter speed, et cetera to use for proper exposure and such. If you don’t know what those terms mean, then you need to learn!

Basically, shutter speed controls the amount of time light is let into the camera. Aperture controls the size of the lens opening, which affects how much light is let in. So, when you take a photo, the camera lets light in a certain amount of time from a certain size opening.

COMPOSITIONAL TECHNIQUES:

There are lots of compositional techniques, and honestly, a lot of them conflict with one another. The key is to use the compositional rules that work with your particular situation. For a sample, I’ll give you three powerful and easy-to-implement techniques:

1. Isolate. Beginners make the mistake of trying to photograph everything in a single shot. Don’t. Take a simple picture with a definite subject that anybody will understand as the main object of interest. If a viewer has to ask what to look at, you have a cluttered shot.

“Colorful Chamelion” captured by PictureSocial member Lonnie Williams

2. Avoid the Middle. People that take photos for “memories” take shots dead center. You want photos that look nice, thus, you’re going to want to use the rule of thirds. Simply stated, it says to avoid placing your subject in the middle of the frame. Place the subject to the left or the right, top or bottom.

“Moto Cross” captured by PictureSocial member Pat Kehoe

3. Use Lines. Many different compositional tips fall into this category. Use lines to lead to the subject of interest. This can add more impact to the subject. For example, have lines on a road lead to a car far ahead. Also, you can use lines to set the mood. Vertical lines make shots look fast-paced, whereas horizontal lines make for relaxing shots.

“Time to Say Goodbye” captured by PictureSocial member David Hobcote

This was just a brief touch on the tips and techniques out there for taking awesome shots. The ultimate advice for photography success, however, is one you are going to hate hearing — practice! Overstated, but true.

About the Author:
Al Sanchez from phototechniques.info, shows others how to open their eyes to the breathtaking photo opportunities all around them.