HOW TO TAKE AMAZING PHOTOS OF FOOD, CORRECTLY !

Photo by:  townsquarebuzz.com
WE ARE ALL GOING TO SEE A LOT OF PICTURES OF
FOOD ON SOCIAL MEDIA IN THE NEXT FEW WEEKS! 
SOME PHOTOS WILL NOT BE SO GOOD, AND SOME
WILL MAKE YOUR MOUTH WATER!
 
TIME FOR US TO TAKE A STAND AND LEARN HOW
TO TAKE PHOTOS OF FOOD CORRECTLY !!!
 
HERE ARE SOME TIPS ON HOW TO TAKE PHOTOS
OF FOOD CORRECTLY:
 
FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY:  TIPS FOR TAKING BETTER FOOD PHOTOS:
By Dave Kennard:
 
Have you ever been flipping through a magazine or browsing the internet and seen an image of an entrée that instantly made your mouth water? A good photograph of food can make your delicious dish look even more delectable than it already is. If you want to take high quality food photographs for your business—or just your blog—here are some tips to help you get better food photos.
 

 

photo by julien haler

STYLE IS EVERYTHING:
This may seem like a bit much, but “styling” or arranging your food carefully can make a dramatic difference in your food photographs. On professional food photography shoots, a food stylist will often be employed just to get the food looking its best. Many parts of the food may not even be real! Thankfully, you don’t need to go this far. Just make sure your food looks nice with the important features showing. For example, for a burger photo, make sure the lettuce isn’t covering up the burger. Or, use a plain plate so as not to distract from the food. A garnish related to the subject will also enhance the photo. For example, for a cheese sandwich, crumble some cheese on the side of the plate.

photo by Agustín Nieto

LIGHT IS KEY:
When lighting food, we want to avoid harsh shadows and highlights. To do this use a soft, diffused light source. A shaded area with reflected natural light can work well. For artificial light, try lights reflected from large umbrellas, or large softboxes. Don’t light your subject directly from the front, as the light will fill in all the shadows, giving a flat image with no texture. Instead, light from the side to bring out the texture and details in the food.
 

photo by rpavich

PLAY WITH ANGLES:

Food can be shot both straight down from the top, straight across from the side, and from virtually any other angle. The angle you choose should depend on the food you are photographing. When most of the detail is on the top of the food, such as a bowl of soup, it’s normally best photographed from above. Food with the detail on the side, such as a burger or sandwich, meanwhile, is better photographed from the side.

photo by Matteo Paciotti

For food with detail in both the top and side, you can use a 45 degree angle. Of course, there’s no reason not take a few shots of the food from a variety of different angles. Also trying getting some close-up detail shots.

FIND YOUR PREFERRED DEPTH OF FIELD:

All things in photography are subjective, but depth of field (the amount of the photo in focus) is probably one of the more subjective food photography ‘rules’. Some photographers prefer to use a very shallow depth of field, with just the leading edge of the food in focus.

photo by Saaleha Bamjee

However, other photographers prefer all of the food in focus. If you want all of the food in focus but the background out of focus, you may need to use a tilt-shift lens, particularly if you are shooting the food at an angle. A tilt shift lens allows you to change the plane of focus so that rather than being parallel with the camera’s sensor, it is at an angle. Tilt shift lenses are quite expensive, so if you are on a budget you can try and recreate the effect in Photoshop. It won’t look as good a real tilt-shift photo, but you can use Photoshop plugins such as Topaz Lens Effects or OnOne FocalPoint to blur certain areas of the photo (the background) while keeping the rest in focus. You may also want to look into the LensBaby line of lenses.

About the Author
Dave Kennard writes for www.discoverdigitalphotography.com, offering photography tips and advice. The website covers all types of photography, including landscape, portrait, and macro, and is updated with new photography tips on a regular basis.


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HOW TO BLEND IN WHILE TAKING CANDID PHOTOS

There is a trick to getting real good candid photos.  It’s called:  BLENDING IN !!  How do you blend in when you have that big camera around your neck all the time?   Here is some pointers th…

Source: HOW TO BLEND IN WHILE TAKING CANDID PHOTOS

HOW TO BLEND IN WHILE TAKING CANDID PHOTOS

There is a trick to getting real good candid photos.  It’s called:  BLENDING IN !!  How do you blend in when you have that big camera around your neck all the time?   Here is some pointers that should really help.  Once you master this, the best photos can often be the best CANDID PHOTOS !

 
HOW TO BLEND IN WHILE TAKING
CANDID PHOTOS:
Article by:  Nimish Thapar:
 
One of the toughest things about being a photographer is going unnoticed with a camera when trying to get good candid shots. Most of the time when people see you with a camera, they tend to stiffen up; the camera can make them nervous. And this is not exclusive to amateur photographers either. Even pros have to deal with this at parties or weddings, where people of the general audience are not expecting to photographed. The following are some things you can do to help people feel more at ease when you take your photos.

“La bambina al matrimonio” captured by Roberto Taddeo

WEAR YOUR CAMERA, DON’T CARRY IT:

Although we have heard this advice on multiple occasions to help us become better photographers, this also doubles as advice on being comfortably accepted as someone who will be taking photos. It is human habit to become accustomed to certain traits of one’s environment. For example, some people are notorious for always having a book with them, while others may be known as the person who always has earbuds in their ears. The goal here is to have people begin to associate you with your camera, so that when you walk around with one, people just accept it as part of who you are. This goes a long way to spread the comfort around your friend circles, and over time people will acclimate to it.

In a similar vein to the last point, it is also a good idea, if you are going to a party where you may not know everyone, to carry your camera with you from the start. I once went to a summer camp where one of my floor mates carried a camera from the moment I met him. It was only about a day before I found this habitual, and it even felt odd for him not to have his camera with him, even if it was just in the dorms for nightly meetings. The idea here is again to make people think naturally that you will have a camera. If you get to a special occasion, and start pulling the camera out of a big bag, people may feel more intimidated than if you just had it around your neck from the get-go.

SUBJECTIVITY, NOT OBJECTIVIY:

While it is true that you as a photographer want to appear objective when interacting with people, sometimes taking a moment to lower your camera and mingle at the party can go a long way with building trust in the people present. If someone doesn’t know you, it will be harder to get a candid shot of him/her when the time comes. They might be the kind of person who immediately shies away from anything with a lens. By opening up to them, and letting them know you are a person as well as a photographer, you build trust, and they may be more than comfortable to let you take their photo. This technique is particularly effective on children, as they will be the quickest to shy away. If they know you are friendly, they will be more likely to ignore you than to run away from you.

 

“The Meeting” captured by Rolando (Click Image to See More From Rolando)

DON’T FORCE A PHOTO:

It might seem odd talking about not taking photos when you were hired or asked to do so, but sometimes this may be the best route. I find it easier to get better photos if you simply ask, even with a gesture, if you can take someone’s photo. However, if they say no, or are uncomfortable about it, simply lower the camera, and acknowledge their wishes. Though you may not get a photo of them, they will also do you a favor by not spreading rumors around the party that you are forceful in your hunt for photos. You build a ripple effect trust this way, and it is even possible that later on in the party, as more people know of you, the same person might be more willing to let you photograph them.

“Wedding” captured by Varin

HAVE FUN:

Most importantly, keep your spirits up. People will be able to tell if you are bored of taking photos for the event, or if you are truly excited. The excitement, when present, will spread around, and will help in taking great photos. Simply have a good time, and your photos will turn out that much better.

With that all in mind, go have some fun shooting some new photos.

 
About the Author
Nimish Thapar is a budding photographer, just getting into the field of photography.
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