AMAZING PHOTOGRAPHERS DO WHATEVER IT TAKES

20 amazing photographers who are ready to do anything for the perfect shot
When anything interesting, terrifying or beautiful happens somewhere around the world, you can bet that a photographer will be on their way to take a shot of it. Most of them won’t stop at anything to get that one incredible shot. Here are 20 photographers whose readiness to achieve their goal will quite simply blow your mind.
PRETENDING TO BE A SNOWDRIFT:

ANIMALWORLD
HE WAITED FOR A HALF A DAY LIKE THIS:

japonec.eu
PHOTOGRAPHERS ALWAYS HAVE TO BE READY TO RUN LIKE CRAZY:

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AS WELL AS DEAL WITH ALL KINDS OF SERIUOSLY DANGEREOUS SITUATIONS

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AND OCCASSIONALY DEAL WITH THEIR FEAR OF HEIGHTS

Guido Sterkendries

AND AT THE SAME TIME STAY POSITIVE – NO MATTER WHAT HAPPENS:

(с) Sergey Borodin

THEY’LL BEAR ANYTHING IF IT MEANS THEY WILL GET THE RIGHT ANGLE:

(c) Dejan Smaic

AND RISK EVERYTHING IN ORDER TO KEEP TRACK OF SOMETHING IMPORTANT:

(c) Michael-a


THEY CAN ALWAYS SNAP AN ORDINARY OBJECT BETTER THAN MOST OF THE REST OF US CAN

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THEY JUST KNOW HOW TO POSITION THEMSELVES TO GET THE RIGHT PERSPECTIVE:

boredpanda

THEY KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO GET RIGHT UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL:

kykyryzo.ru

THEY ALWAYS HAVE EVERYTHING THEY MIGHT NEED AT THE READY

(с) Gleb Tarro

…..NO MATTER HOW HEAVY IT IS:

(c) Juza

THEY TAKE GREAT CARE OF THEIR EQUIPMENT:

boredpanda

AND THEY ARE ALWAYS READY TO FACE THE ELEMENTS:

(c) Veselin Malinov

THEY GET INSPIRATION WHEN OTHERS FEEL NONE:

(c) Ivan Kuznetsov

THE RIGHT PERSPECTIVE IS THE KEY TO SUCCESS:

(c) chrischambersphotography

YOU HAVE TO HOLD YOUR BREATH:

(c) Will Burrard-lucas

AND CONTROL EVERY MUSCLE IF YOU WANT TO SUCCEED

(c) Shamas Malik

AND THE MOST IMPORTANT THING:  HAND OVER SOMETHING IMPRESSIVE TO YOUR BOSS:

boredpanda


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LEARN HOW TO VISUALIZE YOUR MASTERPIECE

snow wood dawn landscape
Photo by Joshua Woroniecki on Pexels.com

To accomplish great things we must first dream, then visualize, then plan… believe… act!

FEEL
This is probably the hardest part of my process to describe. Hiking in the highlands, I am privileged to have access to some amazing landscapes,; as I walk through them I am overwhelmed by options. This makes it hard to identify when I see a truly special scene, since it can be drowned out by choice. However, I can increase my awareness by asking myself a question every time I raise the viewfinder to my eye: “Why do I feed the need to photograph this scene?” It kicks starts a little bit of dialogue in my head. Once I’ve answered that question it naturally leads to others:

  • What should I include in the frame to support my rationale for taking the photo?
  • What should I leave out?

In many cases, this discussion takes place in a matter of seconds as I scan the image in my viewfinder. Often it results in a mental image of the photo I want to take. This part of my process isn’t limited to when I am actually in the landscapes I love photographing. I may get a feeling about a photo I want to take when I am reviewing images from a previous shoot, or I might see something completely unrelated that sparks an idea for a photograph.

green and brown mountains beside river under white clouds and blue sky
Photo by Martin Portas on Pexels.com
SEE

Once I’ve got a reason for taking the photo—and hopefully have a mental image or at least a general mood I want to capture in the photo—it’s time to really look at the scene before me.

  • What elements support the mood?
  • What elements stand out in that mental image?
  • What can I do to accentuate those elements?

The next step is to identify what elements could distract the viewer. Can they be eliminated without changing the image’s mood? This is where I actually start shooting, by taking some ‘sketch’ shots and reviewing them on the LCD.

a person sitting on wooden planks across the lake scenery
Photo by S Migaj on Pexels.com

DECIDE

Based on my ‘sketch’ shots I then identify the key elements in my composition. I also have an idea of what elements I want to leave out or minimize. Now that the content is nailed, I need to decide on the exposure, and I may adjust my depth of field based on what I want to include or exclude. Since depth of field is controlled by aperture, that will influence my overall exposure—I generally try to expose to the right without clipping the highlights. I may take a couple more ‘sketch’ shots to fine tune my settings. I use the LCD to zoom in and verify my focus and check the histogram and blinkies to ensure I’ve not lost any critical detail.

snowy forest
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

TAKE

Finally, I combine everything I’ve learned in the previous steps to take my final image. I verify my exposure settings, focus point, and composition. Then I press the shutter. I close my eyes for a minute and dive in to the mental image I had of the image I wanted to take. Then I return to the final image and try to gauge whether I’ve got a chance of processing it into the image in my head. If I think I’ve got a good chance, I take a marker image—a pure black image of the lens cap—to indicate that the previous image is my master. I’ll then go back and delete as many of my sketch shots as necessary to speed up import and processing later. Just be careful if you do this; I’ve been dumb enough to delete my final image by accident! The A7 has the option to protect an image, which I do frequently use to make cleaning up sketch shots easier and safer.

About the AuthorRobert Keith, a photographer of five years, is originally from South Africa but now lives in Scotland. He loves landscape and macro photography. He’s lucky enough to live on the borders of Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park, so he’s spoiled with beautiful vistas to photograph.
For more of the work that Robert Keith has done… go to his website at:
http://www.r-f-k.co.uk/


NOTE: GUEST AUTHORS ARE WELCOME AND APPRECIATED.

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THE TWO BIGGEST REASONS PHOTOGRAPHERS FAIL

REASON #1:

I have worked in a photo store before, for almost 20 years.  I have seen people come and go.  I have also seen those people try to do photography as a profession.  They have tried to be a wedding photographer.

Photo by Mariah Krafft on Unsplash

But, after finding the struggles of working with people, worrying about making the client happy, worrying if you are a good enough photographer, they give up after a year or so of trying that. 


So, maybe the next thing to try is being a more freelance photographer and take these wonderful pictures of landscapes and scenery for a living:

Photo by KAL VISUALS on Unsplash

Then, after taking a series of, what seemed like pretty good landscape photos, you started comparing your photos to the ones you see in a magazine, and they just don’t compare.  Or you also find that it is hard to find a place to sell your photos.   So, you give up on that one.  But, wait !

Let’s try being a Wildlife photographer! They must make a lot of money, and I can do that!

Photo by Vicky Sim on Unsplash

Is anybody getting where I am headed with this?  You are right.  This is actually a very typical story of a lot of photographers who bought their camera, hoping to make some money with their photography.  Why can’t they make money taking pictures with their camera?
There are 2 reasons people don’t make money with their cameras:

  1.  They don’t have the patience they need to do it.
man using black camera
Photo by Nugroho Wahyu on Pexels.com

“GOOD THINGS TAKE TIME”

2- People fail to keep learning as they go, or learn from their mistakes.

As I was mentioning about the failing photographer above, one of the reasons the photographer failed, is that they weren’t taking the time to keep improving themselves.  This is an industry that involves self-teaching every day.  When I want to get good at something, I subscribe to magazines, read books, read articles, find websites, do what I can to learn everything I can, myself. 

I had a retail store that sold electronics goods for about 8 to 10 years.  I had my staff learn that way as well, and often we would have the company rep come in to teach us their product line.  Sometimes we were more well trained than the company rep.  We got so that we did not have the sales rep come in anymore because we were more well trained ourselves than the sales reps.  We knew how to succeed in that store, and we did.  It was a smooth running, smooth successful store. 

Conclusion:

SO, IF YOU WANT TO SUCCEED IN PHOTOGRAPHY:  DON’T GIVE UP, AND STAY FOCUSED ON LEARNING AS YOU FAIL.

SOMEONE I WANT TO MEET …… AND WHY

10 Facts About Ansel Adams | Mental Floss
Probably the most famous of all photographers: Ansel Adams

It would be a great honor to meet Ansel Adams, but, he is gone, so I can’t meet him now. He is probably the most famous photographer ever lived.

An incredible photographer who, back in the days of film photography, developed the famous “zone system”.  And he was so famous for how he could create the perfect black and white photos using his “zone system” of getting the exposure perfect in every photo.

(See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_System)As you look at some of his photos, you are certainly mesmerized by the accuracy of his exposure in all his photos.  I can only imagine the time it took for him to take every photo, just because it was so involved:

Be A Modern Ansel Adams - Outdoor Photographer
One of Ansel Adams famous photographs.

No computer work done in any of his photos.  Everything was as naturally done in the camera as you can get it.  But, he passed away at the age of 82 in 1984.  So, I could never meet him now. 

So, who is the famous photographer that I would like to meet today?  Let me introduce you to him:
I may have mentioned that I have been in the photographic industry for some time.  Years, working in a retail store, and seeing books published and seen names and faces in the magazines. And the name that has been shown more than anyone I can think of is:

ART WOLFE

Today’s most famous photographer: Art Wolfe

Art Wolfe (born 1951) is an American photographer and conservationist, best known for color images of wildlife, landscapes and native cultures.[2] His photographs document scenes from every continent and hundreds of locations, and have been noted by environmental advocacy groups for their “stunning” visual impact.[3]
Wolfe’s career has been described as “multi-faceted”, involving wildlife advocacy, art, journalism, and education. According to William Conway, former president of the Wildlife Conservation Society, Wolfe is a “prolific and sensitive recorder of a rapidly vanishing natural world.”[4] In the last 30 years, the public has viewed Wolfe’s work in more than sixty published books, including Vanishing Act, The High Himalaya, Water: Worlds between Heaven & Earth, Tribes, Rainforests of the World, and The Art of Photographing Nature.[4] 

Photography as Art | Lessons with Art Wolfe - YouTube
One of Art Wolfe’s famous photos.

I don’t know of any photographer to date that has had their own documentary show on PBS or any program that has gone longer than originally contracted.  Here is the information on that:
The public television series, Travels to the Edge with Art Wolfe,[8] is a documentary project that explores environmental themes of visual interest. Art Wolfe’s perspectives on nature, cultural diversity, geography and digital photography are the focus of each episode, as he travels to new global regions.[9] The series is hosted by Art Wolfe and supported by a professional film team (Karel Bauer, Field Director/Director of Photography; Sean White, Director of Photography; John Greengo, Field Production; and Gavriel Jecan, Field Production).[10]
The program began with the making of 13 episodes released in 2007.[11] By 2009, 26 episodes were filmed in nearly as many locations, including Patagonia, Madagascar, Alaska, New Zealand, and India.[12] Some of the specific subjects addressed include glaciers of Alaska, and sacred tattoos created by Maori artists.[13] The program is produced by OPB, distributed by American Public Television and aired on Create.
In 2015, Wolfe appeared in the Australian television series Tales by Light.

If you are interested, here is some information about Art Wolfe from Amazon to check out:

CLICK ON THIS LINK TO SEE MORE ABOUT: Art Wolfe

THE EYE OF THE PHOTOGRAPHER:

people face child eye
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

What does a photographer see that the average person not see?  Do they see something different?  What do they look for when they see an image?  Why do their photos turn out better than yours, when you take the same picture?   Here is a perspective from a professional photographer who thought about this a lot, and realized that there is something to this.  Check this out:

The world looks different to a photographer than it does to everyone else. Why can a photographer capture flat images and turn them into art? The eye of a photographer sees light, details, shadows, highlights, shapes and how they interact with each other.

The world looks different if you see it with both eyes rather than with only one eye. Close an eye and look at an object. Do you see what I mean? Well, by closing an eye before taking a shot, you will have a pretty good idea of what you can expect from your image.

Photographers explore the light and texture. Light is probably their most important tool. Photographers are intrigued by the way the nature of light affects the way things are seen. Intensity, direction, and type of light offer the photographer a potential for visual exploration. Photographers have mastered how to use the rules of composition and know when to break them. Photography is a process.

“The Rays of Day” captured by PictureSocial member Robert Davis

Our eyes work similar to a camera. Here are some facts that you might even find amusing: Our eyes have a resolution of around 560 megapixels. They can differentiate around 10 million shades of colors. The ISO of an eye is not great; it can be measured at around 800, and in low light, our eyes do not see color. The equivalent of the aperture would be f/3.5 with a focal length of 20mm. The great thing about our eyes is that they have auto white balance, auto ISO, and a very high dynamic range.

Some photographers have the eye when they’re born, but most of us develop it after practice and training. It can take several years to begin to notice things differently.

A photographer doesn’t need expensive equipment to take great photos. The best camera gear in the world is not going to help a photographer see or be aware of his or her surroundings. It’s all about the art of seeing. With a photographer’s eye, you see things in a way that others don’t. That different way of seeing makes an impression on the people viewing our images.

“Repetition” captured by PictureSocial member Mohammad Amziry bin Roslan

A photographer thinks in photography concepts and sees in terms of photography. If you enjoy taking pictures, your attitude will show up in the final image.

Everything has the potential to be captured. It’s all about picturing an image in your head and making it happen. The more you do it, the better you get at it.

This was presented by a guest author:

About the Author:
This article was written by Joaquin Duenas. Website: theduenitas.com. Facebook: DCreativeSolutions. The Duenitas Digital World is based in Miami, Florida and covers South Florida, the Caribbean, Mexico and Central America.


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