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Part 3 – Photos of the Week, featuring Low light photography !

In this weeks series of training and entertainment, today’s blog is the weekly “Photos of the Week“, but a continuation of amazing award winning photos depicting LOW LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY. And this will give you some idea of just how wonderful low light photography can be, when you see award winning photos. Let’s get started:

PHOTO BY SUNIL POUDEL
PHOTO BY SERGEI AKULICH
PHOTO BY ALEKSA KALAJDZIC
PHOTO BY VLAD CHETAN
PHOTO BY PIXABAY
PHOTO BY LUIZCLAS
PHOTO BY NOUT GONZ
PHOTO BY ALEX MONTES
PHOTO BY JACKSON DAVID
PHOTO BY RAVI KANT
PHOTO BY EFTODII AURELIA
PHOTO BY JOSH HILD
PHOTO BY ALEKSANDAR PASARIC
PHOTO BY MARCELO DIAS
PHOTO BY MARCIL SILVA
PHOTO BY ALEKSEY KUPRIKOV
PHOTO BY IAN BECKLEY
PHOTO BY MATHEUS BERTELLI
A PHOTO BY ROSS PEEBLES
PHOTO BY LANNY COTTRELL
PHOTO BY LANNY COTTRELL
PHOTO BY LANNY COTTRELL
PHOTO BY LANNY COTTRELL

A great collection of low light, night photos to enjoy and to study.

All photos compliments of Pexel Photos except those taken by Lanny Cottrell

Don’t miss tomorrow’s blog on HOW TO TAKE PHOTOS OF FIREWORKS.

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PART 2 – LOW LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS:

In our continuation of the subject of the week: ”Low light photography tips” we will continue on with the subject written by Richard Schneider. Enjoy:

1. Crank up the ISO. The higher the ISO number, the more sensitive the camera’s sensor is to the light that is reaching it. The additional noise that is generated by using a high ISO can be filtered out somewhat in post-processing. Sometimes the extra grain adds a little something special to the shot. Shooting in RAW format allows for the most flexibility in post-processing.

2. Use a larger aperture. The larger the aperture, the more light is entering the lens. Shooting at f/5.6 lets in more light than shooting at f/18 (remember, the lower the number, the larger the aperture).

Lower number aperture settings let in more light through the lens.

3. Slow down the shutter speed. More light is captured the longer the shutter remains open. Keep in mind that a good rule of thumb for clear hand-held shots is no slower than 1/60 of a second. Use a tripod if you’re shooting at anything slower than that, though I have had success at slower hand-held shots using lenses with image stabilization.

4. If you do have to use a flash, try to avoid the on-camera pop-up. It tends to flatten the appearance of the image because the light is hitting the subject directly. Invest in an off-camera flash, angle light so that it is not directly in front of the subject, and use reflective surfaces and diffusers to soften the light. Strategically placed constant light (such as tungsten lamps using soft white bulbs) work excellently for providing additional ambient light without sacrificing the atmosphere of the setting.

Example of Off-camera flas

5. Use your camera’s exposure compensation capabilities. The scale on many of today’s DSLR’s allow from -3 to +3 stops in 1/3 stop increments (my 7D is +/-5). Dial the exposure compensation to the positive side to purposefully overexpose the photograph.

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Some great tips on low light photos.

Tomorrow, Wednesday, the best ”PHOTOS OF THE WEEK” using low light photos.

A PEXEL PHOTO BY PIXABAY

Part 1 – Low light photography tips:

A new week, and whole week of this subject of shooting in low light, or night photography. Also this week, we will do a special presentation on taking photos of fireworks. There is a few tricks to shooting fireworks at night, and we will cover that on Thursday this week.

There are so many things to think about when taking low light photos. And I want to give you this one table to read over and study. I found this to be an AMAZING piece of information, in fact, this is set up so that you could cut this out and store it in your camera bag.

This particular article I found was written by : RICHARD SCHNEIDER and posted this originally on PICTURE / CORRECT. I hope you enjoy this.

Low light photography is something that we all must deal with as photographers. Whether you’re taking photos with a point and shoot during an evening out, shooting a wedding party or capturing a landscape at dusk it’s important to understand the basics of shooting with low light. Photography is all about light. Low light photography is no different, and it offers new challenges and opportunities for creativity. Here is a helpful infographic on the subject:

Low Light Photography Infographic (Click for Larger Version)

Information provided courtesy of Snapsort

We will go into details of the different aspects of low light photography tomorrow.

A PEXEL PHOTO BY CRAIG ADDERLEY