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Photos of the Week: Part 3 – The best Street photography photos

In our continuation of this week’s subject of STREET PHOTOGRAPHY, I felt it was only appropriate to add the best STREET PHOTO’S that I could find, for this week’s: PHOTOS OF THE WEEK !

[PHOTO BY JOAO CABRAL



PHOTO BY JOAO CABRAL



PHOTO BY ELISABETH ENGELS



PHOTO BY SHUKHRAT UMAROV



PHOTO BY SANKALPA JOSHI



PHOTO BY DANILA GIANCIPOLI



PHOTO BY DARIA SHEVSTOVA



PHOTO BY ALEKSANDAR PASARIC



PHOTO BY JANSEL FERMA



PHOTO BY IMMORTAL SHOTS



PHOTO BY SANKALPA JOSHI



PHOTO BY RISHIRAJ SINGH PARMAR



PHOTO BY ROY REYNA



PHOTO BY COLIN LLOYD



PHOTO BY JANSEL FERMA



PHOTO BY ALEXANDER NAGLESTAD



PHOTO BY MARIA EDUARDO TAVARES



PHOTO BY JOANNE ADELA LOW



PHOTO BY LUCAS MONTEIRO



PHOTO BY DANILA GIANCIPOLI



PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE ROELLINGER



PHOTO BY DAVID GEIB



PHOTO BY GUSTAVO FRING



Street photography – Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Street_photographyStreet photography, also sometimes called candid photography, is photography conducted for art or enquiry that features unmediated chance encounters and random incidents within public places. … Street photography does not necessitate the presence of a street or even the urban environment.

PHOTO BY AMINE M’SIOURI



PHOTO BY AJAY SINGH



PHOTO BY JAMES LUCIAN



PHOTO BY RENAN LIMA



PHOTO BY LISA FOTIOS



PHOTO BY ALEXANDER BOBROV



PHOTO BY NIGEL NYUMBU



PHOTO BY BRETT SAYLES



PHOTO BY JEFF GENDLEMAN



PHOTO BY GABRIELA CUSTODIO DA SILVA



THIS IS THE CONCLUSION TO THIS WEEK’S PHOTOS OF THE WEEK! THIS PRESENTS SOME REAL TALENT, AND IF YOU DON’T THINK SO, THEN GO ASK A STRANGER IF YOU CAN TAKE THEIR PHOTO. AND THEN ASK FOR A “MODEL RELEASE” SO YOU HAVE AUTHORIZATION TO DISPLAY THEIR PICTURE. IT’S A TOUGH ART TO GET OUT ON THE STREET AND TAKE PHOTOS LIKE THE ABOVE. TOTAL ADMIRATION GOES OUT TO THE ABOVE PHOTOGRAPHERS.

All photos were compliments of PEXEL PHOTOS. Except for Elisabeth Engels, an independent, award winning photographer from France.

Don’t miss tomorrow’s great continuing blog on “Perfecting Street photography – Part 4.

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STREET PHOTOGRAPHY: PART 2 / TAKING SHARP PHOTOS ON THE STREET !

This is part 2 of our week-long series of learning how to master STREET PHOTOGRAPHY! Yesterday’s blog was a video talking about the 7 steps of being a good street photographer. If you didn’t click on that, you should. It was filled with great information.

As a street photographer, many photographers struggle with how to get sharp focus photos. As a street photographer, most of the time, the perfect photos have to be taken quickly or you will miss the best shot. So, I found this great article about “HOW TO TAKE SHARPER STREET PHOTOS”. Hope this article will help you:

How to Take Sharper Street Photography, Even at Night:

Capturing sharp photographs is by far the toughest technical skill in street photography. People move quickly, you are often moving quickly, the light isn’t usually ideal, and you sometimes have to frame instantly and suddenly. When I take a look at other people’s street work, one of the most common problems I notice is that the photos are not sharp and not in focus.

Jerry Delakis

This being said, there are many tips to allow you to get sharper street photographs. And some are very simple. So let’s get to them.

1. Shoot with a Wide Angle Lens

There are many reasons to shoot with a wide-angle lens, but one of the main reasons is that wide angle perspectives have a larger depth of field. This means that if you miss your focus somewhat, there will still be a large range of the scene that will be sharp, which will give you some leeway to mess up and still get the shot sharp. The trade off is that you have to get closer to your subject than with a telephoto lens, but this usually leads to a better visual look anyway.

The other reason is that wide-angle lenses are generally lighter and easier to maneuver. Steadier hands = sharper photos.

28mm and 35mm are probably the most common focal lengths for street photography (50mm is used a lot as well, but it’s too much of a telephoto view for my tastes). I prefer 28mm.

“labels”

2. Ideal Camera Settings for Sharpness

While you can go slower and still achieve perfectly sharp shots, a shutter speed of at least 1/320 of a second, and optimally 1/500, is recommended to fully freeze people in motion. If I am in a very dark location then I will sometimes stop down to 1/250 or even 1/160, but I prefer not to.

Similarly, we generally want to use the smallest aperture possible (small aperture = larger number), for the same reason behind using a wide-angle lens, because there will be more depth of field. With more of a scene that will be sharp, the more leeway we have to get the focus correct. When possible, it’s best to shoot from f/8 to f/16.

So if we want to shoot at 1/320 or 1/500 of a second and f/8, and the light isn’t great, something has to give. That means we will need to push our ISO. Despite what you might have been told, shooting at high ISOs for street photography is often the number one key to creating street photos that have a higher technical quality because of the flexibility it allows for your shutter speed and aperture. You should test out your cameras upper limits for ISO to see the amount of grain that you are comfortable with. With the 5D Mark II, I often shoot in ISO 800, 1600, and 3200.

Also, grain is beautiful.

“Gold can’t buy you everything”

3. Zone Focus (Pre-Focus)

Zone focusing is the technique of manually focusing your camera to a specific distance, say 8 feet away, and then photographing people as they enter that range of distance from your camera. For instance, with my 5D Mark II and a 28mm lens, if I pre-focus the camera to 8 feet away at f/8, then everything from 5.5 feet to 15 feet will be within an acceptable range of sharpness.

This is one of the keys to being successful at street photography because auto-focusing can be a huge hinderance in many situations. If you have the time to autofocus or manual focus through the viewfinder then you should do it, but focusing these ways takes time, which isn’t often ideal for many of those fast moving situations. I probably zone focus for 75 percent of my street photos.

A good exercise for this is to take a tape measure and measure two feet from your lens all the way up to 12 feet and try to memorize those distances away from you. This is a skill that needs to be practiced continually.

It can also be good to learn how to slide the manual focus without looking. What this means is that if someone is walking towards you then you can capture them at 10 feet away sharp and then as they get closer you can move the manual dial to 6 feet without looking to be able to capture them sharp at 6 feet away as well.

Also, I would only recommend zone focusing with focal lengths of 35mm or less. With more telephoto views with shallower depth of fields, it is much more difficult to guess distances and still get shots perfectly sharp.

4. Stopping Your Motion and the Stutter Step

By far my biggest pet peeve of photographers is when they don’t stop their own motion before taking a photo. I see it all of the time. People frame, focus, and capture an image and don’t even stop moving. It’s sloppy. Don’t do it. How can you get a sharp photo while you are still moving unless you are shooting at 1/1000 of a second?

The stutter step is basically just a way of stopping your motion instantly while in mid stride to take a shot and then continuing that motion right after the shot. Just stop in mid stride for a half a second, take the photo, and continue your stride. It’s a great way to stop quickly and take a shot without drawing too much attention to yourself. Just be careful about people being behind you. I have stopped short a couple of times and had people bump into me. In those cases, I just pretend to be a dumb tourist (instead of what I really am, which is a dumb photographer).

“The Chase”

5. Pick a Spot / Background and Wait There

You really want a technically great street photograph? Then plan it. Find the location, wait for the right light, and choose the perfect settings ahead of time. Then, wait patiently for the right person to enter your scene. It is about a million times easier to get a technically good street photograph this way than by only taking spontaneous shots as you come across them.

At Night:

Street photography at night is one of the most incredible experiences. Cities glow, people and scenes become more magical, and it’s just exciting. However, you need to be careful. Choose safe areas or travel with a friend. Don’t bring too much attention on yourself or your equipment.

“Noodletown, Chinatown”

6. Step Back

During the day I much prefer to get closer to my subjects, but often when out at night I will step back somewhat and get further from my subjects. When subjects are a small part of a dark scene it generally looks more interesting than when they’re a small part of a scene during the day, and the backgrounds are often much more interesting. Of course this is a gross generalization and every situation is different.

When you step back, you don’t need to use as fast of a shutter speed to capture moving subjects sharp. The shot above was taken at 1/60 of a second and the subjects are all super sharp.

7. Find Glowing Window Signs

When you’re shooting at night, seek out lampposts or artificial light sources and wait there to photograph people as they pass by. These are often very strong light sources if you are close enough to them. You can see this in the previous photograph, but getting even closer to the light source and shooting away from it is often a good idea as well.

8. Tripod and Blur

Who says you need sharp people as long as you have a sharp background? Put your camera on a tripod and wait for lots of people to walk through. Some people will be blurry and some sharp. It is a very interesting effect, especially of crowds.

“Partying, Lower East Side”

9. Photograph with a Flash, Even During the Day

Some street photographers prefer to use flash to bring out their subjects and to make them sharp, even during the day. Bruce Gilden is probably the most famous flash street photographers, and Bruce Davidson is another photographer you should take a look at. He would photograph with a flash in the NY subway system back when it wasn’t very safe. It takes some nerve to do that.

This strategy is a little too intrusive for my tastes out there, but I love the look when other photographers do it.

My final word of advice is to not become too obsessed with sharpness. You don’t need to pixel-peep each image from a few centimeters away. When you are aiming for a sharp photo, of course you want it to be as sharp as possible, however view the finished photograph from a traditional distance that normal viewers will look at it from to truly gauge how the photograph looks.

Aim to get sharp photos, but don’t become too obsessed with sharpness.

This article originally written by: James Maher

This is the conclusion of this article or blog (part 2) on MASTERING STREET PHOTOGRAPHY ! Tomorrow, Wednesday May 27th, will be a special: PHOTOS OF THE WEEK, featuring the best photos of Street Photography. I am sure you will enjoy seeing the skill behind these great photographers.

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY: LEARN THE SKILLS HERE:

There are many different types of photography in which you can become skilled at. If you want to be good at portraits, you will learn the skills necessary to take great portraits. If you want to learn how to be a great wildlife photographer, you will learn what you need to learn from a skilled wildlife photographer. If you want to learn how to be the best at landscape photography, you will study from the best. And if you want to learn how to be skilled at street photography, then HERE IS THE BEST PLACE TO LEARN.

Street photography is a gutsy type of photography that, if you haven’t tried it, you will find it a difficult photography skill to learn. And yet, there are some street photographers who have learned how to make a great living on taking photos from wandering the streets. But, just what kind of photos would you take doing Street Photography? This might be a skill that is new to some of the newer photographers, following this blog. But, there are some great photographers that have made a good amount of money, taking pictures from the people on the street. But, there is a lot of rules and tricks you should learn before you decide if you want to learn to master this art.

During this week (May 25th through May 29th), I will spend some serious time going over the tips of how to become a great ‘STREET PHOTOGRAPHER”. I will post some articles from professionals that know the skills, and are willing to help you learn this art. Remember, photography is an art, and this is just one of the special types of art with photography.

I hope you will enjoy a whole week of learning this skill. As I went through what I wanted to present, believe me, that I want to become or at least try to become a street photographer. This is an exciting form of photography, and I hope you will read and learn about all the different ideas of street photography.

GETTING STARTED WITH STREET PHOTOGRAPHY: 7 TIPS:

ARTICLE BY SUNNY SHRESTHA With a video training seminar from: Evan Ranft.

Unlike other photography genres like portrait, fashion, wedding, or product, street photography requires you to be present out in the field and wait for the moment. Think of it like shooting wildlife or sports. You never know what’s going to happen. And you can’t spare a second to get distracted. Street photography requires you to be always on the lookout for the right moment, and simultaneously be creative. This “pressure” is one of the core reasons why many beginners find street photography quite intimidating. Photography Evan Ranft talks about 7 street photography tips to help you get started, and shares some creative ideas too:

Click on this arrow, and watch this artist explain the 7 tips of great street photography!

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Unlike other photography genres like portrait, fashion, wedding, or product, street photography requires you to be present out in the field and wait for the moment. Think of it like shooting wildlife or sports. You never know what’s going to happen. And you can’t spare a second to get distracted. Street photography requires you to be always on the lookout for the right moment, and simultaneously be creative. This “pressure” is one of the core reasons why many beginners find street photography quite intimidating. Photography Evan Ranft talks about 7 street photography tips to help you get started, and shares some creative ideas too:

In his discussion, Ranft talks about some simple and important preparation techniques, shooting methods, and gear to ease into the convoluted world of street photography.

As a part of your preparation, scout some interesting locations. Where does the action happen? Where is the light interesting during the morning, the evening, the day, and the night? Find interesting light and shadow patterns. Being in an interesting location instantly boosts your confidence and helps you take some great street photos.

When it comes to gear, 35mm is what pure street photographers love and preach. But, when starting out, it can really be intimidating to stand next to someone’s face and take their photo. So, it’s okay if you want to try out some zooms. This will help you get into the zone. Also, when out shooting, don’t hope to get away with changing lenses. Multiple lenses act as distractions. So, walk around with one lens only.

Keeping things simple is key when taking photos. Look for moments, and try to mix it with basic photography techniques. Keep an eye out for leading lines, patterns, symmetry and framing. And don’t worry about what depth of field to use in every photo. If you’re not comfortable, stick to f/8 and pay more attention to the composition. The rest will follow.

Most importantly, it’s necessary that you give yourself time to get yourself going. Do not rush. Allow yourself at least an hour to warm-up. Once you get to know the location you’re shooting in, your creativity will start kicking in and you’ll find it easier to take photos. Have some patience.

This concludes today’s session on STREET PHOTOGRAPHY ! We will see you tomorrow as we explore more information about STREET PHOTOGRAPHY!

Here are some great examples of good street photography:

A PEXEL PHOTO BY GELA DEL ROSARIO



A PEXEL PHOTO BY MUSA ORTAC



A PEXEL PHOTO BY LUCIAN PETRONEL POTLOG



A PEXEL PHOTO BY: ABHISHEK GOEL