Avoid overloading detail in your photos!

As you look at the title, you are probably wondering what in the world am I talking about. Let’s get into it.

When you take a scenery photo, there is something called “detail overload” in which a photographer will think that they need more “stuff” in the photo to give it dimension, when in reality, it’s just the mountain that you should have in the photo.

Let’s give you an example of what I mean by showing you a video. Audio and Video are the best way to learn, I think. I have used video more and more in my blogs so you can really learn what I mean….

Click on the center arrow, and learn what we mean by overloading your photo.

What do you do when you’re presented with a scene that appears like a wonderland? You’re probably tempted to photograph all that you see, capturing everything in one frame, right? Well, as Popsys puts it, this is pure greed. A better approach would be to be selective and compose in a way to include only the things that are unique to that location. This draws the viewers’ attention to the unique qualities of the particular place, making the image more interesting. And no, this doesn’t mean that you should never take wide shots. Opt for wide-angle shots if the subject in itself stands out from its surroundings. This could be due to lighting, color, contrast, or any other factors.

“By including too much, you actually weaken all the other elements that could stand out if you focused on them more.”

And when it comes to editing an image, we’ve become used to recovering the shadow and highlight details too much. While doing so isn’t essentially a bad practice, keep in mind that sometimes an image can appear better if it doesn’t reveal everything. Take for instance silhouettes. In this case, you improve the image by not revealing all the details. Even an overexposed sky can look natural and give the image an ethereal look..

The above article was mostly written by Sunny Shrestha, from Picture / Correct

Here is a few great examples of what you should do in your landscape photos: Keep it simple.

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: Experimental Photos !

Interesting subject for today’s Photos of the Week! There are a lot of talented photographers out there who deserve credit for their experimental photos. They try different things in their photography skills and have some real creative projects worth sharing. Take a look at these winners:

Photo by Eve Maier on Unsplash
Photo by Ryan Stefan on Unsplash
Photo by Federico Beccari on Unsplash
Photo by Isi Parente on Unsplash
Photo by Abdullah Ahmad on Unsplash
black and white dog on grass field
Photo by Sebastian Coman Travel on Pexels.com
man on mid air performing skateboard trick
Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com
Photo by Tengyart on Unsplash
Photo by Marek Piwnicki on Unsplash
Photo by Wolfgang Hasselmann on Unspl
Photo by Tinh Nguyen on Unsplash
This pinspirational photo for sale by going to: www.123photogo.com/shop/
man sitting under a tree reading a book during night time
Photo by Josh Hild on Pexels.com
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Unsplash
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Unsplash
Photo by lionel abrial on Unsplash
Photo by Niilo Isotalo on Unsplash
Photo by Yash Raut on Unsplash
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Unsplash
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Unsplash
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Unsplash

There are some amazing, creative artists in photography. Hope you enjoyed these.

Here is one more for the road:

Photo by Johannes Plenio on Unsplash

HOW TO “REALLY” TAKE CARE OF YOUR CAMERA AND LENSES:

Oh, I hope you don’t think this going to be one of those boring subjects, but, I have learned from professionals and instructors alike that this is one of the main courses in becoming a good photographer. And that is the proper care of your camera and lenses.

Let’s get started first with the camera: I am going to refer especially to a DSLR type camera so that once you know all the details in this, you can certainly take care of anything else photographic.

A DSLR camera has several points of interest in taking care of your camera. The first is how to take care of the body. Nothing like a video to show you how to do it:

Now, I am sure this was done to promote their products, and I have no problem with this. You can generally find similar products at any camera store. By the way, I said a camera store. Walmart is not a camera store….

Your lens is the actual item that makes the photo. That is where the image comes from. It is the most important part of taking photos, and should be the most important thing to take care of. Here is the best video I found for that:

This is mostly about lens care, but more great info about camera care as well.

Now, how about those who use their cell phone for their photography. That is important for those who don’t carry their regular DSLR camera with them everywhere, but all of a sudden you see something to take a photo of, and all you have is your cell phone. Here is what you need to know:

Very to the point, and I like it’s detail. Watch this too!

Please learn these basic principles of how to take care of your camera, and you will enjoy your camera, no matter what it is.

Photo of the day:

Sky diving is an adventurous sport in itself – not many can dare to try it. But as if it weren’t thrilling enough, there’s a another type of sky diving loved by adrenaline junkies called “wingsuit rodeo”. If you haven’t heard of it, this involves a non-wingsuiter riding on the back of a wingsuiter after jumping off an airplane from about 13,500ft. Sounds crazy right? A Reddit user by the name of skwrl71 took this amazing photo which gives a perfect view of the diver’s experience:

https://i0.wp.com/external-preview.redd.it/l11KndmqyVA4cDCV7spitqmtFWXnyL3vGGDGY8fIbm0.jpg?w=750&ssl=1
“Wingsuit Rodeo” by skwrl71 (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

The photographer took the image on a helmet-mounted Sony A7RIII activated by a “bite switch”. He took the photo at an altitude of about 8,000 feet from the ground after they’d jumped from an aircraft at 13,500ft. In case you’re wondering, the photographer was also wearing a wingsuit and it’s impressive how he was able to get this perfect composition while still having to maneuver his flight.

“I was probably flying about 2 yards from them as I took this.”

The clouds in the background and the ground down below give an awesome perspective of how high they were flying. And what’s interesting is how calm the lady appears mid-air. As the photographer explains, this was her 100th skydive but first rodeo.

Would you try this adventure sport if you got a chance?