HOW TO TAKE PHOTOS OF ABANDONED BUILDINGS / GHOST TOWNS

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303magazine.com

The Art of taking Photos of Abandoned buildings and Ghost Towns:

The art of taking pictures of abandoned buildings has recently become an art.  There is some history that needs to be displayed for all to see, and the photographer who can bring out that history, the stories of these buildings, can truly become an artist.  As you walk through these old buildings, you have to develop an eye for what has happened here in these old buildings.  What can you see that can tell a story here.  And then the question is:  should you take a picture of it in color or black and white.  Black and white will make it seem like you were there at the time the building was alive.  

Before you go taking photos of abandoned buildings I want to give you some tips of what you need, or need to do before going to do this type of photography.   Let’s start from the beginning:

  1. Taking pictures of abandoned buildings requires some preparation before you go.  Think for a moment what you are getting into.  Let’s look at some of the issues of an abandoned building, or even a ghost town:

A-  These buildings are going to be dirty and dusty.  Plan on bringing lens cleaning cloths, blower brushes, whatever you need to keep your camera clean.

B-  Chances are you might be in dark and dreary places, so bring your tripod.  And don’t think you will wing it or just shoot at a higher ISO.  Sharper pictures look nicer when done on a Tripod.

C-  Do bring a flashlight or light with you so don’t end up falling through a floor that isn’t there or nails that are on the floor.  Getting a new tetanus shot isn’t fun.  Make sure you can find your way. 

D- Bring a friend.  It is not wise to do this alone.  It’s like hiking into a wilderness area.  You shouldn’t do that alone either, and you shouldn’t go into abandoned buildings alone either.

2- CAPTURE NEGLECT

This is the time to show how neglect has taken a toll on the building:

A- Show abandoned dining rooms and tables where the family once gathered

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huffingtonpost.com

B- Show how there are now cracks and fissures in the walls that have developed with the passage of time:

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telegraph.co.uk

C- See if any ceilings or floors have fallen and have now created a void:

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Uk.news. yahoo.com

OR:

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3- SEEK NATURAL LIGHT FOR DRAMATIC EFFECT:

Natural light can be the best source to portray the mood in an abandoned building. Artificial light may not allow you to really capture the feeling that an abandoned building possesses. Find a soft, natural light source with some penetrating sunbeams. Such light adds ethereal vibes to your images.

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Photo by Stefan Bauman / media rumworld.com

OR

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goodfon.su

 

4- LOOK FOR SYMMETRY:

Human beings are “programmed” to love symmetry. A symmetrical distribution of elements in your frame can draw the viewer’s attention to your image. Try shooting down the center point for a near mirror mage.

symmetry in photography

 

5- CAPTURE NATURE:

In a way, it can almost be devastating, or comical depending on how you look at it, but, some abandoned buildings have been abandoned so long that nature has taken over some of it, and mother nature has added some of it’s own.  It is always interesting to get some pictures of that as well:

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articlesandmedia.wordpress.com

 

6- INCLUDE STAIRCASES IF AVAILABLE:

Some homes have unique staircases, some are ordinary, but, whatever the case is, you should get a photo of the staircase.  Get a closeup of the staircase if it happens to be ornate:

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lisanneharris.com

OR

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ourworldstuff.com

 

7- FOR OLD BUILDINGS SHOOT IN BLACK AND WHITE:

Shooting in black and white gives the photo a more aged look.  If you have the ability to add a little sepia tone, then that is nice as well.

 

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fineartamerica.com

How do you shoot in black and white?  Check your camera settings, or this is something you can do in post production.  

 

Taking photos of abandoned buildings, ghost towns is something really rewarding.  It is an art form that you will find a lot of out in the West of the United States.  Good Photographers can get some really good photos that truly bring back the old wild, wild west.   They tell a story by the way they capture the photo.  Be different and capture these photos at different angles so that you can get some good story lines to your photos.  Take a look at some photographers that take a lot of photos like this.  If you are interested in finding a photographer to follow, leave your email or comment below.

 

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     More photos of abandoned homes:

 

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PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: AMAZING THINGS IN THE WORLD !

Photos of the Week:  Throwback Thursday !  Dated:  8/24/2017

From the Website:  Amazing things in the World.  

This website had such amazing photos, I just wanted to share these again with you.  Please take a look again and love them, or comment on them.

 

 

CONTINUING THE SEARCH FOR GREAT WEB SITES THAT ALREADY HAVE A GREAT COLLECTION OF PHOTOS THEY HAVE COLLECTED OVER THE YEARS, I HAVE FOUND ANOTHER GREAT WEBSITE.  THIS ONE IS SIMPLY TITLED:  AMAZING THINGS IN THE WORLD.  190,000+ PEOPLE ALREADY FOLLOW THIS WEBSITE, AND IT IS CERTAINLY GOT A GREAT COLLECTION OF PHOTOS.  HERE IS JUST A SAMPLING OF PHOTOS THAT I THINK ARE WORTHY OF BEING:  PHOTOS OF THE WEEK:

Don’t be afraid to be different.
Dancing clouds over California
Christmas in Berlin, Germany.

This is the 182m tall Vøringsfossen waterfall in Norway.
Light was particularly interesting as it diffused nicely from the fog in the valley. I took a panorama of three verticals to fit the massive view into one frame.

No name on the photographer.  

Beautiful, and adorable
Black & White
Amazing bridge in Germany.

Photo by: Daniel Korzhonov
Sleeping
Golden hour in Florence – Italy .
Arctic Angel
Beach in Australia full of bioluminescent plankton
Heaven’s Gate, China
Sid!! Is that you.

Kjerag, Norway.
Picture of the day
Great wall of China

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TIPS FOR MAKING YOUR PHOTOS TRULY UNFORGETTABLE:

Wouldn’t you love to make unforgettable photos?  Here’s how:

You know we have gone through a lot of articles and tips on how to do photography.  Now, I would like to maybe, fine tune this so that your photos become more “alive”, or more exciting to you and to everyone who sees them.  I realize that almost everyone who reads this blog regularly knows the rules to composition, and I will keep going over different ideas about that, but, here is some great ideas about how to make your photos even better:

FRAME YOUR PHOTOS:

See what you can do to “frame” your subject.  Put something around your subject so that it seems to be highlighted even more.  Do not overdo the framing, but make it natural:


Photo by: Gable Denims
  



MOVEMENT:

When shooting something that has motion or movement with it, allow the subject to have something to move into.  For example, this would be better if the subject was not in the center.  If something was moving, have some area in the frame of the photo to move into.  See examples:


Photo by:  Emil Eriksson
    

Photo by:  Douglas Arnet

Photo by:  Seth Sanchez
   

DIRECTION:

Our brain perceives information from left to right, so it’s best to position all the important stuff in the right side of the frame.


Photo by:  Elliott Koon
  

Photo by:  Alexander Hadji
   

Photo by:  Ramil Sitdikov 

CAMERA ANGLE: 

Try taking photos from a different angle.  Instead of taking pictures standing up, get down to the level of the subject, if it’s a pet or child.  You will find a different story to your photo:


Photo by: Matteo De Santis


Photo by:  Miguel Angel Aguirre
  

Photo by: Tom
  

NEGATIVE SPACE:

There are two spaces in every image:

  • positive space (it shows the main subject);
  • negative space (usually it’s the background).

Don’t forget to keep an eye on what is happening in the negative space; you want it to emphasize your main subject, not cramp it.


Photo by:  Mohammed Baqer

Photo by:  Valery Pchelintsev 
 

Photo by: Veselin Malinov 
 

DEPTH

Depth will give your shot a more three-dimensional and rich feel. There are few features that can help you achieve it:

  • parallel lines, which come to one point in the distance;
  • gradually dissolving fog will make your photo seem layered;
  • tone (volume is transmitted through color: darker objects appear closer, and lighter objects appear farther away);
  • depth of field (if you blur the background, clear objects will appear closer, while fuzzy objects will seem more distant).

Photo by:  Bas Lammers 
  

Photo by:  Bas Lammers 

Photo by:  Bas Lammers 
  

FOREGROUND:

When taking a scenic shot, that has depth, add something in the foreground.  If you add something in the foreground, your viewers will feel like they can relate to the size and depth of the picture more.


Photo by:  Bas Lammers 
   

Photo by:  Ekaterina Korkunova

Photo by:  Murad Osman
 

SHADOWS AND REFLECTIONS:

Use these elements to make your picture more interesting and dramatic. You can create a visual ’dialogue’ between the subject and its reflection (shadow).


Photo by: menovsky


Photo by: Anna Atkina

Photo by: Pablo Cuadra
      

THE GOLDEN HOUR, AND THE BLUE HOUR:

The “Golden Hour” is my favorite time to shoot.  It is the one hour before sunset.  The colors have gone to a golden color in the sky and the colors everywhere are a nice warm golden hue.  It really warms things up and makes things very pleasant.

THE GOLDEN HOUR:


Photo by:  Olivia L’Estrange-Bell


Photo by: Joe Penniston
  

Photo by:  Lanny Cottrell

BLUE HOUR:

This is the time when the sun has set, or just before the sun comes up.  The light is predominately blue.  Check it out:  This is often called twilight:


Photo by: Joe Penniston
  

Photo by:  Flo.from.Suburbia

Photo by: Flo.from.Suburbia

There you have it.  Some great tips and tricks to really try out.