MID YEAR / NEW PHOTO PRODUCT ANNOUNCEMENTS

WHETHER YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A NEW CAMERA, OR JUST CHECKING OUT THE LATEST IN TECHNOLOGY, HERE IS THE LATEST NEWS ON CAMERAS AND LENSES FOR THE TRUE CAMERA ENTHUSIAST:

Nikon to Announce a New Mirrorless Camera Priced around $900

Nikon will introduce a new mid-price mirrorless camera product in fiscal 2019. The same interchangeable lens can be used with products that correspond to sister models such as the high-end model “Z7” launched by the company in the autumn of 18th. It is expected that the price will be in the 100,000 yen range, which is easier for the general consumer to pick up than the leading 200,000 to 400,000 yen model. The aim is to develop the demand of users other than existing enthusiasts.

DXOMARK PUBLISHED CANON RF 50MM F/1.2L USM LENS REVIEW

Conclusion from DxOMark:

There isn’t a huge pool of f/1.2 50mm lens to compare the Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM against, and most of its competitors have a maximum aperture of f/1.4 or f/1.8. If optimum image quality is your major concern, then the Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM A makes for a better choice, although it can’t be mounted directly on Canon’s mirrorless cameras. However, if you need the extra 1/3-stop of light, then the RF lens makes a good solid proposition that is a step up from the older Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM.

Hasselblad X1D II 50C Medium Format Mirrorless Camera Officially Announced

The previously rumored Hasselblad X1D II 50C Medium Format Mirrorless Camera is now officially announced. The US price is $5,750, and it is now available for pre-order at B&HAdorama. Shipping is scheduled to start in Mid July, 2019.

Product Highlights

  • 50MP 43.8 x 32.9mm CMOS Sensor
  • 16-Bit Color, 14-Stop Dynamic Range
  • Hasselblad Natural Color Solution
  • 0.87x 3.69m-Dot Electronic Viewfinder
  • 3.6″ 2.36m-Dot Touchscreen LCD
  • Leaf Shutter System, 1/2000 sec Sync
  • ISO 100-25600, Up to 2.7 fps Shooting
  • Dual SD UHS-II Memory Card Slots
  • Built-In Wi-Fi, USB 3.0 Type-C

This second-generation X System camera shows a revised and enhanced feature-set designed to quicken performance and make overall operation even more intuitive and streamlined. At the core of the X1D II remains the large 43.8 x 32.9mm 50MP CMOS sensor, which yields high-resolution imagery with a wide 14-stop dynamic range, 16-bit color depth, and an ISO 100-25600 sensitivity range. This sensor utilizes Hasselblad’s Natural Color Solution, too, which delivers realistic, pleasing color tones for great consistency and smooth tonal transitions. An updated electronic platform also enables a faster 2.7 fps continuous shooting rate as well as a faster startup time, reduced shutter lag and blackout times, and more responsive autofocus performance.

CONFIRMED: CANON G5 X MARK II, G7 X MARK III, RF 24-240MM F/4-6.3 COMING SOON

It is now confirmed by the Japanese website Nokishita that Canon will soon announce the new Canon PowerShot G5 X Mark II, Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III and RF 24-240mm f/4-6.3 IS USM Lens. The detailed specs and pricing info is still unknown at the present.

Below is the full list of new products:

CAMERAS ARE ADDING MORE FEATURES FOR LESS MONEY, THE PRO CAMERAS ARE GETTING MORE PIXELS, OR MORE DEFINITION, THE PROS ARE HAPPY AND THE AMATEURS ARE HAPPY. ISN’T IT A GREAT TIME TO GET INTO THE CAMERAS ?
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SKY PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS AND TECHNIQUES:

I often will get up in the morning to go take some photos of the day, take a look at the sky, and if there are some nice puffy clouds, I say to my wife: “oh, the photos today will be magnificent because we have been blessed with beautiful clouds today”. As photographers, who love to take landscape photos, don’t you just hope for days, when the clouds are there to add to your photos? Whether it’s early morning photos, or late evening photos, I can’t help but pray that my day will have lovely clouds in the photos I take.
Because I was thinking so much of that the other day, I was delighted to find this great article by John King who wrote this article for PICTURE/CORRECT. Titled: SKY PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS AND TECHNIQUES. I wanted to share this with you, and show some photos as well taken with clouds in them that show how much more dramatic the photos are because of clouds:

How many beautiful nature pictures have we all seen with little or none of the sky-scape? You may think of the sky as only some unavoidable background for most of your nature photo subject matter, and the more blue it is, the better. Well guess what? Mother Nature has a treasure trove of eye catching possibilities up, overhead if you only take the time to have a look and know what to look for.

Photo by Christian Collins; ISO 100, f/9.0, 1/400-second exposure.

Lets start with the basics. Obviously, a beautiful clear, deep blue sky makes for a good backdrop for many subjects but can be rather dull by itself, as can a completely gray overcast sky. Now start adding fluffy white cumulus clouds and it starts getting more interesting, but it is only the beginning of the many opportunities the sky can provide for unique and pleasing photos.

Take fair weather cirrus and stratus clouds for instance. Their thinner and more spread out nature can provide a completely different look for your photo. Even at mid-day the sky can be gorgeous. For example an approaching thundershower can be striking with the billowing and ever changing shapes and textures, and bright white color as it approaches. It is like a mountain-canyon vista in the sky, and is easily captured compared to other faster moving, unpredictable subject matter. And you will have no problem capturing multiple, unique shots of the storm before it moves off or overhead because of its continual morphing of shapes and colors. Also some clear skies around the storm can add to its magnificence and enhance your image.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Using a digital camera for capturing mid-day storms is easy since auto mode frequently works well at adjusting the cameras ISO setting (light sensitivity), preventing overexposure of the clouds white colors and preserving the definition of their many shapes and edges. Some cameras may not do this as well as others, so manually adjusting the ISO setting may be required for best results.

Always remember when taking full sky-scape shots to have a clean sky, meaning nothing obscuring the view such as trees, buildings, power lines, etc. Of course those objects can work great in their own compositions, but at the moment we are concentrating on that big empty space overhead.

Photo by Neil Williamson; ISO 100, f/8.0, 1/321-second exposure.

Dusk and dawn sky shots are definitely the most colorful and one of my favorites. Sure, clear sunrises and sunsets are nice, but by far the best is when you have high, wispy, cirrus clouds, and mid level stratus to reflect the suns beautiful and ever changing colors as it rises or sets. Lower puffers or cumulus can add some nice contrast as long as they do not block the view of the higher ones which reflect most of the colors. All this is most easily captured over water or a flat landscape with no obstructions. A water vista often works best because of the additional color reflections.

I have found that the deepest reds and purples are from about 15-20 minutes before sunrise and after sunset, with the oranges and yellows occurring shortly before rise and set. Of course a vertically building cumulus cloud will reflect stunning colors as well during these times. I have seen large cumulus and stratus clouds light the area up like you were in a giant red, pink, or orange room, then fade away as the suns rays leaves them and hit the higher clouds.

Perfect twilight photo taken 15 minutes after sunset by Lanny Cottrell

You will want to make sure your cameras ISO setting in auto mode is adequate for the conditions when working in lower light levels. If not, try manually adjusting the setting to increase the cameras light sensitivity. Settings can vary from camera to camera, but you will be able to see when it looks right. This is when the sky still looks natural, not too bright or glowing, and not too dark or fuzzy. Try to match what the camera is picking up with what you see with your own eyes. Low light conditions can be tricky so take your time, being careful not to overexpose.

Photo by Jason Carpenter; ISO 800, f/11.0, 1/4000-second exposure.

Hopefully this information will encourage you to get out there with your camera and explore a part of nature that is often overlooked.

About the Author:
John King (Everglades Photography) is a pilot and amateur photographer residing in South Florida. His interests include kayaking, sailing, and nature photography, and he has recently completed the coastal portion of the Florida Master Naturalist Course.

This is blog #981

Here are a few more photos of landscape photos with clouds in them. Can you see how much better the photos are with the clouds? Imagine the photo without the clouds.

















Photo by Lanny Cottrell



BEST WEATHER PHOTOS OF 2018

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: 6/20/2019: Best Weather Photos of 2018 !

It’s amazing that throughout the world, there are photographers that have their camera, taking pictures of the weather. And they are there to capture the most amazing photos of the weather that we never see, unless someone like me, posts these amazing photos. These photos, in this case, may not be the most beautiful, but, they capture the weather at it’s worst, or they may capture it in it’s most impressive state. But, there are photos here that will make you realize, that: I should be taking photos of this kind of stuff! So, here are some amazing photos that should be shared, and they make this weeks” PHOTOS OF THE WEEK!

Grand Prize Winner: “Celestial Encounter” submitted by Marcel Siegle 

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After his mother passed away, photographer Marcel Siegle was having a hard time finding work. He was looking for the perfect subject to photograph to get him back on his feet during the 2017 Great American Eclipse. Siegle decided to make his way from Santa Rosa, California, up to the Deschutes River near Warm Springs, Oregon, where he knew he’d get one of the best views of the celestial event. 
The image is actually a self-portrait of Siegle, who has been a photographer for more than 30 years, and an avid fly-fisherman for nearly just as long. Siegle, who runs a commercial photography business, enjoys snapping photos of fly-fishermen in action as well.


Second Place Winner: “Buffalo in Orange” submitted by Rick Beldegreen

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Rick Beldegreen’s photo, “Buffalo in Orange,” was taken in Zambia on a photography trip.
Beldegreen, a retired veterinarian, says he now has more time to chase his second passion, wildlife photography. He frequently takes trips for the sole purpose of getting the perfect shot of animals in the wild.

“We knew that this buffalo herd frequented the area, and that they would typically bed down for the night in this forest,” the photographer told weather.com. “Then, in the early morning, they’d start making their way out of the forest to start grazing at the watering holes. The previous day we saw that it was just an amazing sunrise; all the dust that was kicked up by this herd of buffalo created this great effect.”
Beldegreen said he didn’t get any great shots that day, but was deterimined to try again the next day, to see if the scene would repeat itself. 
“To my great fortune, it did,” he said. “It created this amazing orange glow.”
By his prediction, there were at least 500 buffalo present at the scene.

Third Place Winner: “Mother Nature’s Lightshow” submitted by Michael Wasserberger

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Michael Wasserberger was flying over Des Moines, Iowa, on a commercial flight when he shot this storm image by happenstance. 
“Whenever I travel, I always have my camera nearby because you never know what you’ll come across,” he told weather.com. “I happened to look out the window and saw these incredible storms, and I knew this was a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

The Fan Favorite Winners

The sun sets over the Grand Canyon on May 20, 2018. (Tony Bendele)
1 of 3The sun sets over the Grand Canyon on May 20, 2018. (Tony Bendele)


2018 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest Finalists

“Tiny,” a rescued brown bear, dries off at the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Keenesburg, Colo. (Bary and Athena Burns)
1 of 50“Tiny,” a rescued brown bear, dries off at the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Keenesburg, Colo. (Bary and Athena Burns)


2018 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest Finalists

A tornado is seen in Dodge City, Kan. (Lauren Leete)
3 of 50A tornado is seen in Dodge City, Kan. (Lauren Leete)



2018 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest Finalists

A coyote stands in falling snow outside of Chicago. (Brian Butler)
5 of 50A coyote stands in falling snow outside of Chicago. (Brian Butler)



2018 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest Finalists

A thunder storm is captured off the coast of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. (Jean-Claude Ardila)
13 of 50A thunder storm is captured off the coast of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. (Jean-Claude Ardila)



2018 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest Finalists

The weather coming in from the Pacific Ocean crashes into the Eastern Sierras with mighty force. (Miles Morgan)
19 of 50The weather coming in from the Pacific Ocean crashes into the Eastern Sierras with mighty force. (Miles Morgan)


2018 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest Finalists

As the sun goes down in Cody, Wy., two wild stallions fight on the horizon line. (Jamie Baldanza)
26 of 50As the sun goes down in Cody, Wy., two wild stallions fight on the horizon line. (Jamie Baldanza)


2018 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest Finalists

An amazing photogenic close range tornado is captured near Roggen, Colo., on June 19, 2018. (Blake Brown)
34 of 50An amazing photogenic close range tornado is captured near Roggen, Colo., on June 19, 2018. (Blake Brown)


2018 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest Finalists

Mountain climbers descend France's Aiguille du Midi while the rest of France is under a heatwave. (Emilie Talpin)
47 of 50Mountain climbers descend France’s Aiguille du Midi while the rest of France is under a heatwave. (Emilie Talpin)


Some of these weather photos were amazing! Could you do it? Sometimes, it just takes you being in the right place at the right time. But, would you be prepared to capture these weather phenomenon? Think about it. And we hope to see your photos here next time.

This is blog # 980
Later this year: look for the book: “The best of 1000 blogs”

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com






Photo by Johannes Plenio from Pexels