TRUST YOUR GUT:

Photo by Jakob Owens on Unsplash

In this series of ”THE ART OF SEEING”, I am bringing up the meme from Ken Lee, with Luke Skywalker: USE THE FORCE! The idea here is that if you feel positive about your photo, then trust your gut. If you feel you have a great photo, then just go for that. If you go into Post production, and things get even better, you know you are on the right track.

I have gone into Post Production before, and found it was getting worse. I stopped, and just decided to start over. Or, I let it stand with the way it was. It is all about art of seeing. Have you created a photo that is a winner? Hopefully you will practice to the point of knowing if you have a great photo, by feeling that everything went well.

QUOTE FOR THE DAY:

A great photograph is a full expression of what one feels about what is being photographed in the deepest sense and is thereby a true expression of what one feels about life in its entirety.

Ansel Adams

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TRY THINKING YOU ARE A PAINTER!

Photo by Ilnur Kalimullin on Unsplash

This particular blog is all about “feeling your Photo”. Take a look at another famous photographers thought and hopefully you will understand what I mean:

This picture was taken by Ken Lee, and the thought process is what we want to talk about today:

If you want to be successful in photography, and really make a name for yourself, you have to think that every time you take a photo, you need to “feel” something about the photo you are about to take. It’s part of THE ART OF SEEING! A good photographer is also an artist. If you want to be a good photographer, what do you need to do to create a piece of art? Is it composition? Is it learning that you camera is the “palette”? Your camera takes great photos. But, can it also take great art, from what you do with the camera. That is what you need to learn.

woman leaning back on tree trunk using black dslr camera during day
Photo by David Bartus on Pexels.com

I often will go to a special place to take my photos. Or, I will just be driving to some destination, and looking off to the side of the car, I see a great photo opportunity. Yes, I stop and use my palette to get what I want:

Driving out in a small farming town, in the rain and fog on the mountains, I saw this fence, and thought: “Oh yeah, leading lines” which draws your eyes back to the mountain in the background. I actually got a couple of raindrops on my lens, but, kept it on for impact.

Here is another great quote I found about how important to think of photography as an art:

To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.

Henri Cartier-Bresson

One more:

Art is what we call…the thing an artist does. It’s not the medium or the oil or the price or whether it hangs on a wall or you eat it. What matters, what makes it art, is that the person who made it overcame the resistance, ignored the voice of doubt and made something worth making. Something risky. Something human. Art is not in the …eye of the beholder. It’s in the soul of the artist.

Seth Godin

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Tips on photographing your favorite fruit or vegetable !

Photo by Immo Wegmann on Unsplash
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Taking photos of your favorite vegetable or fruit, and still be creative, is a challenge. This photo above of the tomato, is technically a fruit, but used as a vegetable in most servings. (The tomato is the edible berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum,commonly known as a tomato plant. – Wikipedia) To me, this is one of my favorite fruits or vegetables. There are many varieties of tomatoes, and I am growing in my own personal garden, about 8 different types of tomatoes, to see if one tastes better than all the rest. If I find I like most of them, then next year I will grow a nice tasty variety.

But taking pictures of tomatoes is an art. There is two ways to take this photo. 1- to make it look real yummy, I like the photo above, because the photographer had some water splashed on it, to give it that freshly picked, washed, ready to eat look. If that is the way you like it too, then notice it is placed on a dark background. That makes the tomato stand out than letting your eye wander to something else. Plus, it is a very nice photo to hang on the kitchen wall for decoration. 2- Get a photo of the tomato on it’s vine or plant, such as the one below:

Let’s look at another favorite of mine: the Pineapple. Funny name because it doesn’t look like anything from pine, and it doesn’t look like an apple, nor grows like either one.

Oh, mmmm, that looks so good. (The pineapple[2][3] (Ananas comosus) is a tropical plant with an edible fruit and the most economically significant plant in the family Bromeliaceae. — Wikipedia) To get a photo of any fruit or vegetable, get a plain backdrop like you see with the pineapple, and the tomato (above). That seems to be the most popular way of getting a good photo. For some people, it might be hard to get a photo of the actual pineapple plant, because it is a tropical plant. But, other ways to get photos of the fruits, is to show it in the bowl, ready to eat:

But, how do you take a photo of a very small fruit or vegetable, if that’s your favorite? I would recommend you either get a macro lens because it is designed to focus extremely close to the subject. And they make a macro lens for cell phones now as well.

The other idea, of course is to use close-up filters. This is a very inexpensive way to get close to the subject. I would recommend you get a set of 4 close-up filters so you can get as close as you need:

Make sure you get the right size for your lens.

And here is a couple of pictures of small fruit, using either close-up filters or a macro lens.

close up photo of a cherry fruits
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
close up photo of stacked chocolates bars beside raspberries
Photo by Lisa on Pexels.com
Conclusion:

If you are taking a photo of your favorite fruit or vegetable, get as close as you can, with a plain background is the ideal way to do this. Or, like the photo above, use the fruit alongside other things you are going to eat.

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DAY 6 OF 10 – DEVELOPING YOUR EYE – LANDSCAPES :

brown mountains
Photo by Roberto Nickson on Pexels.com

Day Six: “Landscape” — Crop Your Image

Today, let’s walk in the footsteps of masters like Ansel Adams and focus on landscape photography.

Landscapes generally focus on wide, vast depictions of nature and all of its elements, from formations to weather. In this genre of photography, you won’t find much of a human presence: nature itself is the subject. A focus on nature isn’t mandatory, however — you can also capture a sweeping panorama of a city.

Today, take a picture of a landscape. Focus on the gestalt — the entire setting as a whole, like the shot above of the English countryside in Kent — rather than a specific subject or focal point within the scene. The setting itself is the star.

Today’s Tip: You may have trained your eye to crop your photo while viewing it “in camera.” But if not, crop your landscape photo once it’s uploaded onto your computer, using a free image editor like PicMonkey or Pixlr.

We hope you’re having fun scouting and taking your landscape photos! If you’re looking for inspiration, take a peek at the landscapes of nature photographer Kerry Mark Leibowitz. Her shots of national parks in North America are stunning.

Ready to crop your photo? Sift through your images from today’s shoot and find a candidate that needs cropping. Or, if you come up empty, look back to previous shots from the course or pick an image from your Media Library.

Things to look for:

  • Stray objects in the background, near the frame’s edges and corners.
  • People around the perimeter that have “photo-bombed” your picture.
  • A foreground or background that is too prominent or “heavy.”
  • A composition that is too-centered (with your subject in the middle), that might benefit from cropping along two sides (in other words, cropping to the Rule of Thirds).
Cropping the right side of today's landscape image in PicMonkey.
Cropping the right side of today’s landscape image in PicMonkey.

There are many tools available for free on your computer or even on your phone. If you have something in the photo that you really don’t want, use these tools to crop off what you don’t want. It will make a better photograph.

Your city might make a beautiful landscape picture. Look for the best angle to get the best part of your city.

All this week, the series continues: Developing your eye. Read these articles carefully to learn what you need to “see” better photos.

Many times professional photographers prefer to use Wide Angle lenses (click on that link to see what is available for your camera) to get the best landscape photos.