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CAMERAS TODAY CREATE QUESTIONS

I admire people who have taken the plunge to buy a DSLR camera or a new Mirrorless camera system. Somewhere in my mind, I think that you are an artist, or want to become an artist. That is why you bought that camera, because you want to create something more than what your cell phone can do.

screen of photo camera with photo of chocolate cupcakes
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But, what does all this mean on my camera? How come my photo didn’t turn out like I thought? What kind of lens should I use? Why does this flash system make my photos look worse? And on, and on? Questions are how we learn.

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TRY THINKING YOU ARE A PAINTER!

Photo by Ilnur Kalimullin on Unsplash

This particular blog is all about “feeling your Photo”. Take a look at another famous photographers thought and hopefully you will understand what I mean:

This picture was taken by Ken Lee, and the thought process is what we want to talk about today:

If you want to be successful in photography, and really make a name for yourself, you have to think that every time you take a photo, you need to “feel” something about the photo you are about to take. It’s part of THE ART OF SEEING! A good photographer is also an artist. If you want to be a good photographer, what do you need to do to create a piece of art? Is it composition? Is it learning that you camera is the “palette”? Your camera takes great photos. But, can it also take great art, from what you do with the camera. That is what you need to learn.

woman leaning back on tree trunk using black dslr camera during day
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I often will go to a special place to take my photos. Or, I will just be driving to some destination, and looking off to the side of the car, I see a great photo opportunity. Yes, I stop and use my palette to get what I want:

Driving out in a small farming town, in the rain and fog on the mountains, I saw this fence, and thought: “Oh yeah, leading lines” which draws your eyes back to the mountain in the background. I actually got a couple of raindrops on my lens, but, kept it on for impact.

Here is another great quote I found about how important to think of photography as an art:

To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.

Henri Cartier-Bresson

One more:

Art is what we call…the thing an artist does. It’s not the medium or the oil or the price or whether it hangs on a wall or you eat it. What matters, what makes it art, is that the person who made it overcame the resistance, ignored the voice of doubt and made something worth making. Something risky. Something human. Art is not in the …eye of the beholder. It’s in the soul of the artist.

Seth Godin

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SHOOT BLACK AND WHITE TO IMPROVE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

Photo by Javant Kulkarni / The Art of Black and White

Have you ever done black and white photos? Do you think that there is a place for black and white in your repertoire? Are you not sure how to do black and white?

Let’s take care of all those questions and get you excited about taking black and white photos. Black and white is, what I like to call: “The true art of Photography”. Whether that is right or not, is totally up to you, but, I can take you to some black and white photos, and it would be breathtaking to see it.

The above photo is a great example of an artistic approach to black and white. And, I think there are a lot of people who would love to take a photo like that.

If you research old photography masters such as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston, you’ll notice they photographed primarily in black and white. Now, part of this had to do with technical limitations of the time. Until the 1930s, color photography was tough to produce. Yet even once Kodachrome, a color film, was invented, plenty of photographers stuck to black and white, simply because they preferred it to color.

Why? One reason is that black and white presents interesting creative problems. The world looks different in black and white, which means that you can think about tone, texture, and light in new ways. In fact, when you remove color, the emphasis of an image naturally shifts to other compositional elements.

For some photographers, this can feel freeing; you’re no longer stuck thinking constantly about color but can instead focus on the more fundamental aspects of photography: tone and light.

grayscale photography of woman wearing veil
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

1. Black and white helps you see differently

If you research old photography masters such as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston, you’ll notice they photographed primarily in black and white. Now, part of this had to do with technical limitations of the time. Until the 1930s, color photography was tough to produce. Yet even once Kodachrome, a color film, was invented, plenty of photographers stuck to black and white, simply because they preferred it to color.

Why? One reason is that black and white presents interesting creative problems. The world looks different in black and white, which means that you can think about tone, texture, and light in new ways. In fact, when you remove color, the emphasis of an image naturally shifts to other compositional elements.

For some photographers, this can feel freeing; you’re no longer stuck thinking constantly about color but can instead focus on the more fundamental aspects of photography: tone and light.

As I look around the internet for black and white photos, I just wish that people understood black and white better. There are far too many photographers, who take the photo in color, then convert it to black and white, without even caring about the artistic nature of black and white.

As you’re probably aware, not all great color images will translate well to black and white. But the inverse is also true: certain images that look great and black and white won’t look good in color, which means that you’ll have a whole new set of photo opportunities to contemplate.

2. Black and white eliminates distractions

Photo by Lanny Cottrell photogrpahy

The world in color is great, but sometimes it can be a bit overwhelming.

Specifically, there are plenty of distractions that exist in color that simply disappear when converted to black and white.

For instance, a rainbow shirt in a color portrait may draw the eye, but is essentially unnoticeable in B&W. And a distracting red rock in the foreground of a seascape might turn a nice neutral gray following a black and white conversion.

Plus, color itself can take away emphasis on contrast, texture, lighting, shape, and form. If you’re photographing a weathered man with a face full of wrinkles, black and white will highlight the texture of the wrinkles, the intensity of the man’s age. Whereas color will simply distract the viewer and prevent them from seeing what the photo is all about.

Photo by Atilla Hangyasi (2) / The Art of Black and White

Black and white can also eliminate distracting color casts that would otherwise subtly shift the viewer’s attention away from what matters.

3. Black and white offers increased creative choice

greyscale photography of woman holding umbrella
Photo by Kha Ruxury on Pexels.com

Since the world is in color, it is safe to say that color photography is more realistic and descriptive. A color photo depicts the world as it really is – whereas black and white photos only show a version of reality, one that seems more interpretive and creative.

In a sense, this can help you break free from certain restraints. Without color, you don’t have to show the world as it is; instead, you can show what you see, which might involve unusual relationships, interesting shadows, beautiful textures, and so on.

Ultimately, when you take away color, you remove what your viewer is used to seeing. Suddenly, you have to capture the viewer’s attention without the help of color – which also means that you’re free to have fun, experiment, and show the world in a completely new, creative way.

So in a way, black and white forces you to think, but it makes you more creative in the process.

4. Black and white adds emotion and mood

two bare trees
Photo by Todd Trapani on Pexels.com

When you look at the photos that have been in this article so far, do feel a certain mood or feeling with them?

Personally, I think black and white photos almost always create a wonderful mood – or in cases where the mood is already present, the B&W conversion makes it even more intense.

Why does black and white photography go hand in hand with moodiness? I’m not completely sure, but something about tonal range, rich blacks, and deep contrast just appeals to us psychologically. It creates an emotional connection, and it makes you stop, look around, and pay attention.

5. Black and white photography feels timeless

Here’s a common reason why photographers shoot in black and white:

It adds a timelessness to your images.

For one, black and white photography has existed since the beginnings of photography, which means that a black and white image cannot instantly be dated. Also, color schemes change over time, especially in clothing, business logos, cars, and architecture. Therefore, a color image will often include datable elements – but in black and white, these features may be much harder to place.

Personally, I feel that black and white photos seem to transcend reality. Look at the image below. Can you tell when it was taken? Is it a recent shot? Is it from 50 years ago? Or does it exist outside of time?

Photo by Niko Akin / The Art of Black and White

Most of this blog today is compliments of Nisha Ramroop from the Digital Photography School.

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TODAY’S INSPIRATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY QUOTE:

When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in Black and white, you photograph their souls!

Ted Grant

UNDERSTANDING “ISO”

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NIKON CAMERAS: Their History, and their Cameras Today:

Photo by Jan Kopřiva on Unsplash

Nikon cameras is obviously one of the big names in the camera industry. It has covered a lot of people’s desires, because they make a camera model that covers every type of photographer, and including the Professional Photographer. The type of equipment they make for every type of photographer is also very well built, and designed to work with their amazing lenses. Nikon is an actual lens manufacture, and they have become famous for their lenses.

Let’s take a look at the History of Nikon cameras, and see how many of you Nikon users even knew about this information:

black nikon dslr camera lens cover near white petaled flowers
Photo by Irina Iriser on Pexels.com
Headquarters for Nikon Inc. —– By Kakidai – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43641774

Nikon Corporation (株式会社ニコン, Kabushiki-gaisha Nikon) (UK: /ˈnɪkɒn/, US: /ˈnaɪkɒn/; Japanese: [ɲiꜜkoɴ] (listen)), also known just as Nikon, is a Japanese multinational corporation headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, specializing in optics and imaging products. The companies held by Nikon form the Nikon Group.[3]

West Building of Nikon in Nishi-Ōi, Tokyo

Nikon’s products include cameras, camera lenses, binoculars, microscopes, ophthalmic lenses, measurement instruments, rifle scopes, spotting scopes, and the steppers used in the photolithography steps of semiconductor fabrication, of which it is the world’s second largest manufacturer.[4] The company is the eighth-largest chip equipment maker as reported in 2017.[5] Also, it has diversified into new areas like 3D printing and regenerative medicine to compensate for the shrinking digital camera market.[6][7][8][9]

Among Nikon’s notable product lines are Nikkor imaging lenses (for F-mount cameras, large format photography, photographic enlargers, and other applications), the Nikon F-series of 35 mm film SLR cameras, the Nikon D-series of digital SLR cameras, the Coolpix series of compact digital cameras, and the Nikonos series of underwater film cameras. Nikon’s main competitors in camera and lens manufacturing include Canon, Sony, Fujifilm, Panasonic, Pentax, and Olympus.

Founded on July 25, 1917 as Nippon Kōgaku Kōgyō Kabushikigaisha (日本光学工業株式会社 “Japan Optical Industries Co., Ltd.”), the company was renamed to Nikon Corporation, after its cameras, in 1988. Nikon is a member of the Mitsubishi group of companies (keiretsu)

black dslr camera
Photo by Derice Jason Fahnkow on Pexels.com

Nikon Corporation was established on 25 July 1917 when three leading optical manufacturers merged to form a comprehensive, fully integrated optical company known as Nippon Kōgaku Tōkyō K.K. Over the next sixty years, this growing company became a manufacturer of optical lenses (including those for the first Canon cameras) and equipment used in cameras, binoculars, microscopes and inspection equipment. During World War II the company operated thirty factories with 2,000 employees, manufacturing binoculars, lenses, bomb sights, and periscopes for the Japanese military.

Reception outside Japan

After the war Nippon Kōgaku reverted to producing its civilian product range in a single factory. In 1948, the first Nikon-branded camera was released, the Nikon I.[11] Nikon lenses were popularised by the American photojournalist David Douglas Duncan. Duncan was working in Tokyo when the Korean War began. Duncan had met a young Japanese photographer, Jun Miki, who introduced Duncan to Nikon lenses. From July 1950 to January 1951, Duncan covered the Korean War.[12] Fitting Nikon optics (especially the NIKKOR-P.C 1:2 f=8,5 cm)[13] to his Leica rangefinder cameras produced high contrast negatives with very sharp resolution at the centre field.

Nikon – Today:

Photo by Derice Jason Fahnkow on Pexels.com

TOKYO – Nikon Corporation (Nikon) is pleased to announce that four of its products have been successful at the EISA Awards 2021-2022, presented by the Expert Imaging and Sound Association (EISA). The Nikon Z 6II full-frame mirrorless camera won the Advanced Camera award, while the Nikon Z 5 full-frame mirrorless camera received the Best Buy Camera (full-frame) award. NIKKOR lenses were also winners, with the NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 VR S receiving the Professional Telephoto Zoom Lens award, and the NIKKOR Z MC 50mm f/2.8 given the Macro Lens award.

The Expert Imaging and Sound Association (EISA) is a collaboration between 60 expert magazines from 29 countries across the globe, specialized in the fields of photography, mobile devices, hi-fi, home theater audio, home theater display & video, and in-car electronics. For approximately 40 years, EISA has chosen and honored the best imaging products released in Europe over the previous year in a number of categories.

Full-frame Mirrorless Camera “Nikon Z 6II”
Full-frame Mirrorless Camera “Nikon Z 5”
Interchangeable Lens for Mirrorless Cameras “NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 VR S”
Interchangeable Lens for Mirrorless Cameras “NIKKOR Z MC 50mm f/2.8”

As you can see, Nikon is one of the best cameras on the market. They consistently win camera awards, and their lenses too.

I think that it would be safe to say that Nikon is currently the number 1 selling camera worldwide. And they have done it with their reputation of being a good strong, well built camera that can take some abuse, and that is why the professional photographers like this camera.