CREATIVE THINGS YOU CAN TRY ON YOUR CAMERA:

A lot of photography techniques can be complex and require a steep learning curve.

But in today’s article, you’ll learn 11 easy creative photography techniques you can start using today! The techniques described below all require minimal extra equipment and don’t require additional post-processing.

Read on to get the most creativity from your camera with these easy-to-use techniques.

1. Reflection

easy creative photography techniques down low reflection
It’s worth getting down to a low angle for reflections.

This is an easy creative photography technique to learn and is popular among many photographers. The main requirement is finding a reflective surface, though this is not all there is to it. Consider the following, and you’ll be capturing amazing reflection photos in no time:

  • Reflective surface: Look for surfaces that reflect (and there are many). Flat water works well, as does glass, marble, or even a regular mirror.
  • Choose a main subject: A successful photo will match up a reflective surface with an interesting main subject. Consider going out after it’s rained, as a puddle in front of a famous monument may only be there after heavy rain.
  • Find the angle: To get a better reflection, choose the correct angle. This often means getting right up against the reflective surface so the angle of reflection is shallow.
  • Create your own: No reflective surface? No problem. Just create one! Use the surface of a smartphone, a small mirror, or perhaps a bucket that you use to spread water and create a puddle.
  • A filter: The best way to control your reflection is by using a circular polarizing filter.

2. Silhouettes

easy creative photography techniques silhouettes
Strong silhouettes work well against a horizon line.

The next option on this list of easy creative photography techniques is silhouettes.

Silhouettes occur when you photograph against the light. The key is to find an interesting shape, and then make sure the background is brighter than the object itself.

You’ll often need to get down to a low angle and then photograph up toward the sky; that way, you can ensure the silhouetted object stands out against the bright background.

Also, when photographing silhouettes, make sure you expose for the bright background. This will turn the subject into a dark silhouette.

3. Repetition

easy creative photography techniques lines and repetition pattern
Lines and repetition can make for a strong composition.

A great design element to add to your frame is repetition.

This is something you’ll usually need to look for, but it’s sometimes possible to create your own repetition. There are possibilities for this both in nature and in the man-made world. Repetition may take the form of a line of trees, or of many bricks in a wall. The question, then, is how you’ll use this repetition.

Here are a few ways you can work with repetition to improve your photos:

  • Create a texture photo: In this case, the high level of repetition forms a texture.
  • Break the pattern: Here everything else is the same, with one variation. This works well to highlight that variation, which will then be the photo’s main subject.
  • Use background repetition: Backgrounds with repetition work very well for portrait photos or still life images.
  • Two or three: You don’t need to have repetition to infinity; two or three repeating objects, such as wine glasses, can work well.

4. Refraction

easy creative photography techniques glasses
Wine glasses filled with water will produce refraction.

This is a form of photography that can be practiced with a camera as simple as a smartphone. You’re probably thinking of lensballs, but refraction photography can take many forms, including:

  • A lensball: This is a large glass ball that creates a refracted image of the background inside it.
  • A prism: A prism splits the light and can be used to produce a rainbow. You could either photograph the projected rainbow or photograph through the prism.
  • Water drops: Get out after it’s rained, and you can produce refraction in things such as water drops on a spider’s web.
  • A wine glass: Fill a wine glass with water, and you will see the refraction effect!

5. Contrast

easy creative photography techniques silhouettes
Contrast with silhouettes works really well.

Contrast is a great concept to use in your photography.

The most obvious way to use contrast is by emphasizing dark and light areas of your photo through things such as silhouettes and shadows. But this is not the only way contrast can be used in your photography; anything that has an opposite can be used. You might choose to contrast something old with something new, for example.

6. Framing

easy creative photography techniques cave entrance frame
Natural frames such as cave entrances are good frames.

The world is full of frames, from pictures on the wall to window frames. These frames can be used in photography, which is another easy creative photography technique.

You can achieve a great framed photo with any kind of camera. Good options for this include doorways and windows. You can even become more creative and make your own frame using objects that contextualize the scene behind it.

7. Panning

easy creative photography techniques panning
Bikes are the easiest moving object to try panning with.

Panning is a form of intentional camera movement. The technique involves following the motion of a moving object and using a slower shutter speed to blur the background behind it.

As long as your camera allows you to use a slow shutter speed, this is a technique you can try. Those using a smartphone should download an app that allows you to use a slower shutter speed to take a photo.

8. Point of view

easy creative photography techniques buildings from below
A worm’s-eye view can look amazing. This example also shows how lines and repetition can work in a photo.

Changing your angle can give you dramatically different results, and it doesn’t matter which type of camera you use for this technique.

It’s easy to photograph from a standing position, but try some of these alternative angles:

  • Low angle: With this angle, you’ll get low to the ground. Things look different from down there!
  • Worm’s-eye view: This angle involves looking straight up. It can be even more dramatic when you get right down to the ground.
  • Bird’s-eye view: The easiest way these days to take a bird’s-eye view image is with a drone. However, find a high vantage point from a tall building and you can achieve a similar result.

9. Lines

easy creative photography techniques lines
This photo shows several lines converging in the left third of the frame.

Using powerful lines in your photos will almost always give you a strong composition. The trick, of course, is to utilize those lines correctly using the focal length available to you.

Here are some of the lines that can be used in your photography:

  • Leading lines: A leading line leads the eye to the main subject of your photo. This line might take the form of a road or a river meandering through your frame.
  • Horizon lines: Many photographs have horizon lines in them, which is a strong line running through the middle of your frame. Look to position it at the top or bottom third of your photo (using the rule of thirds).
  • Converging lines: In some photos, many lines converge at one point: the infinity point. This can be compositionally very strong. Look for lines of trees or a tunnel for this type of photo.

10. Shadows

easy creative photography techniques shadows
The shadow in this photo shows an element of repetition, as well.

Photographing shadows requires a strong light source. This can be the sun, but an external flash is another option.

The best time of the day to photograph shadows is therefore when the sun is at a low angle: an hour after sunrise or an hour before sunset.

Shadows can be formed and used in different ways. You might photograph a person’s shadow, shadows formed from trees, or the way shadows emphasize the shapes of hills.

11. Minimalism

boat minimalism
This minimalist photo uses a bird’s-eye view taken from a bridge.

Keeping your composition nice and clean is the key to a good photo. This means that one of the best easy creative photography techniques is minimalism.

You can create minimalism even in the most cluttered environment as long as you frame your photo correctly. This style of photography requires that you give your subject some room to breathe. Focus on the main subject and position it in front of an uncluttered background.

Try out these easy creative photography techniques, yourself!

There are so many ways to be creative with photography. Which techniques do you like to use? Are there any simple-to-apply techniques you’ve tried that didn’t make this list? Share your thoughts in the comments!

And if you have any photos that illustrate these techniques, share them in the comments, too!

Then get photographing with these easy creative photography techniques!

The post 11 Easy Creative Photography Techniques You Can Try on Any Camera appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Simon Bond.

Here are a few more photos, using those steps above:

Leading lines
Silhouette
Minimalism
white and brown trees on forest during daytime
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com / Shadows

Pro Landscape Photog Shares Some Tips While He is Working:

I love to share good videos when they come along. You get the information right from the person, and in this case, a professional photographer. We can all use a little help in our landscape photography, and this will help:


The Internet makes it incredibly easy to learn more photography tips than you could ever use. That said, it’s easy to get overwhelming, especially when applying those tips out in the field. That’s usually because “ideal conditions” in landscape photography rarely exist, and even if they do, the window is often small. Today we have landscape photographer Mark Denney who discusses some on-location tips that have positively impacted his photography over the years:

In theory, we only get to read tips and tricks with these ideal conditions in mind. But when you’re out on location, things can get unpredictable. You need to anticipate, prepare for the moment and, when the moment really does present itself, act on it quickly. Otherwise, the opportunity will be lost.

Watch the video as Denney explains how he works in these scenarios. He talks you through what he looks for when setting up his composition, how he anticipates the conditions to change, why he uses a certain lens and what qualities he looks for in a light when composing a shot. Being able to develop such a thought process is essential because it allows you to put all of your knowledge into practice. Otherwise, all those tips you’ve learned are useless.

It is important that you go out, shoot and put your knowledge to practice in order to be a better photographer. What good is the knowledge if you cannot apply it?

Here is just a couple more great landscape photos:

art autumn autumn leaves beautiful
Photo by Valiphotos on Pexels.com
bench cascade creek environment
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
rocky formation on shore of ocean
Photo by electra kay-smith on Pexels.com

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: More incredible photos from BING!

We all know that Bing is one of the bigger Search engines on your computer. Anyone can sign up for Bing as their search engine. But, one thing that is amazine about Bing, is that every day when you start up your computer, they have an amazing winning photo on your computer screen. And you can subscribe to a daily treat of these photos.

With that being said, here are some photos done lately from Bing:

These polar bears seem to be just as happy as we are to visit Torngat Mountains National Park today. Located in Canada at the tip of the Labrador Peninsula and bordering the Labrador Sea, the park is accessible only by boat, charter plane, or helicopter. The name “Torngat” comes from the Inuktitut word “Tongait,” meaning “place of spirits.” The Inuit have lived here for centuries and still fish and hunt across the wide tundra valleys where these polar bears roam. This time of year, polar bears are waiting for the sea ice to form so they can venture out onto the Labrador Sea to hunt for seals.
Framed here for the season by fall foliage, the Cambron Covered Bridge is located along a nature trail in Madison County, Alabama—not Iowa, which is the setting of the bestselling romance novel “The Bridges of Madison County.” It”s believed there were once about 14,000 covered bridges in the US, but fewer than 900 or so remain today, a quarter of which can be found in Pennsylvania. But Alabama has covered-bridge bragging rights, too. The state has 11 historic covered bridges. Built in 1974, the Cambron Covered Bridge doesn”t make the official “historic” list, but it does offer hikers a peaceful passageway with great views of Sky Lake.
Spying the crooked silhouette of Corfe Castle above the rolling, foggy hills of Dorset, England, you might not guess at the ruin”s former palatial beauty—you”ll more likely sense its long history of intrigue, and maybe feel a chill down your spine.
If you”re greeted by a friendly face and a warm “Welcome to Bents” as you stroll up to this old general store, you might be having a paranormal experience: It”s been 50 years since a living soul dwelt in this Saskatchewan ghost town.
After the nesting and breeding seasons of spring and summer have passed, starlings become highly social birds, often gathering in flocks that number in the thousands. These flocks sometimes take the form of a murmuration—when the birds form a group large and dense enough that they appear to move together as a single organism, even if the movements seem arbitrary. Though scientists still don”t quite understand how the individual starlings in a murmuration coordinate their tight, fluid formations, the behavior is thought to be a way to confuse predators.
If it appears to be slinking away from the camera, maybe this chameleon is all too aware of the way some of us humanfolk see reptiles: as frightening at best, disgusting at worst. We know you die-hard reptile lovers are out there too, but it”s undeniable that reptiles” reputation among people has suffered thanks to popular villainous depictions—from “Anaconda” and “Godzilla” to the serpent encountered by Adam and Eve. Even our everyday language throws shade on this vast class of critters: When”s the last time you called someone “reptile” and meant it nicely?
A photographer happened to catch these brown bear cubs in the act of stealing a boat. Patiently, he watched from afar, snapping photo after photo. Realizing what the cubs were doing, he knew he should document this event. Intent on getting the boat into the water, the cubs worked like they’d done this before. Lighting out onto the lake, the bears seemed to enjoy the ride.
We’re celebrating International Dark-Sky Week with an image from a corner of New Mexico that’s one of the best places to stargaze in the continental United States. Dark-Sky Week is observed during the first new moon of April, when stars shine more brightly because the moon isn’t visible. The event was created to bring attention to the harmful effects of artificial light on the natural world, and to remind us of the beauty of an unadulterated night sky. Light pollution not only impacts our ability to see the stars and to sleep soundly, but also creates challenges for many nocturnal species, migrating birds, and even baby sea turtles. So, turn out those lights, look up, and be amazed at the sky that your great-great-grandparents saw.
This mountain hare is starting the year off right. It”s used to cold weather and high altitudes—and, since it”s nocturnal, it”s perfectly comfortable sleeping through an afternoon snowstorm in northeast Scotland. On New Year”s Day, humans in the US are more likely to be found in their natural habitat, the couch, dozing off or perhaps watching one of the college football bowl games on TV. Some more ambitious folks might be getting a jump on their New Year”s resolutions and exercising. First Day Hikes are part of an initiative led by state parks, with hundreds of free guided hikes offered in all 50 states. That sounds great, but maybe a little later. Right now, we think the hare has the right idea.
A mother sperm whale surfaces in the North Atlantic as her young albino calf swims beside her. It”s an especially photogenic moment for these underwater powerhouses, which spend much of their time in the dim depths over 1,000 feet below the waves. You”re meeting them to commemorate the day in 1841 when a young Herman Melville set out from New Bedford, Massachusetts, on a whaling voyage to the South Pacific that would help inspire his masterwork “Moby-Dick.” Today at the New Bedford Whaling Museum, Melville fans will begin a marathon public reading of the novel—an annual event that lasts a leviathan 25 hours.
Burrowing parrots, sometimes called burrowing parakeets, are native to the arid Monte Desert of western Argentina. The birds use their beaks and talons to hollow out nesting spaces in soft limestone cliffs found in the foothills of the Andes Mountains. The parrots sometimes end up captured and sold as pets for the wild bird trade. While that”s not illegal—burrowing parrots aren”t endangered—the capture and sale of these birds and others is part of the focus of National Bird Day in the United States, which is observed on January 5. National Bird Day was created to educate the public about the value of wild birds remaining wild. While keeping a parrot as a pet may seem like fun, the organizers of National Bird Day claim the parrot is going to be healthier and happier in its natural habitat.
If you want to celebrate Take the Stairs Day in style, look no further than China”s Tianmen Mountain (literally Heaven”s Door). About 5,000 feet above sea level, the hole in the mountain is the highest naturally formed arch in the world. Originally a cave, it became an arch in 263 CE when the back side of the mountain collapsed, creating the dramatic opening we see today. You”ll have to climb 999 steps to make it to the top, but we promise the view is worth it.
If you want to celebrate Take the Stairs Day in style, look no further than China”s Tianmen Mountain (literally Heaven”s Door). About 5,000 feet above sea level, the hole in the mountain is the highest naturally formed arch in the world. Originally a cave, it became an arch in 263 CE when the back side of the mountain collapsed, creating the dramatic opening we see today. You”ll have to climb 999 steps to make it to the top, but we promise the view is worth it.
Welcome to the snowy Bavarian Alps, where the mountain called the Zugspitze (TSOOG-shpit-seh) casts a cold shadow over the Eibsee, a small and serene alpine lake. Situated on the border with Austria, the peak is Germany”s highest point at almost 10,000 feet above sea level, towering over the lakeside village of Grainau.
Today we”re featuring a picture-postcard view of Val Gardena, a valley nestled in the Dolomites in the South Tyrol region of Italy. This time of year, the remote area may be a bit busier than usual as skiers are drawn to its famous slopes. In summer, it”s known for other outdoor activities, such as rock climbing and hiking. Since the 17th century, the villagers have been famed for their wood carving. Artisans create everything from simple, utilitarian items, like bowls, to finely detailed figurines. One of the woodcarvers” biggest hits? A wooden peg doll that was popular across Europe and the US during the 19th century.
At a quick glance, you might mistake these dunes for massive snowdrifts. Although they do make for great sledding, the tiny crystals that form the dunes at White Sands National Park are not snow or ice but gypsum, a soft mineral often used to make plaster and chalk. The dune field became a national monument on this day in 1933 with a proclamation by President Herbert Hoover, which set aside nearly 150,000 acres for preservation. Recently, on December 20, 2019, President Trump signed legislation making it the 62nd designated national park in the National Park System.
January 21 is Squirrel Appreciation Day. Really. It was established by Christy Hargrove, a wildlife rehabilitator from North Carolina, to draw attention to the importance of these remarkably widespread creatures. Native to five continents and currently living on six (there”s no Antarctic squirrel), there are about 285 species of squirrels in the world, ranging from the tiny African pygmy squirrel to the Bhutan giant flying squirrel (when in Bhutan, be ready to duck).
This time of year, from late January to early March, babies arrive on the Serengeti. At the height of the wildebeest calving season, thousands of calves are born every day. Moments after birth, these youngsters can walk, and in just a few days, they”ll be able to run fast enough to keep up with the herd. That”s a good thing. Calving season isn”t just a draw for safari tourists wanting a front row seat at the start of the circle of life, but also for predators like lions, cheetahs, and hyenas on the hunt for easy prey.
This is the sun-soaked ice cap of Iceland”s Eyjafjallajökull. Remember the name? It”s that unpronounceable volcano that made you miss your connecting flight back in 2010. That eruption and the vast ash cloud it belched over the North Atlantic was the biggest disruption to air traffic since World War II. And this relatively small but volatile island may yet waylay the world again: Eyjafjallajökull is a lightweight among the 32 active volcanic systems dotting the Land of Fire and Ice—its much larger neighbor Katla has been closely monitored since the 2010 incident.
For India”s 70th Republic Day, we”re featuring an uncommon view of the Taj Mahal in Agra. It”s on this day that India celebrates its official beginning as an independent democratic republic after having endured nearly a century of British rule. Republic Day events include presentations of the Padma Awards (national service honors), a Republic Day parade in New Delhi, and other ceremonies.
Russia”s Lake Baikal is a record-holding wonder: It”s the world”s oldest (25 million years), deepest (over 5,000 feet in some parts), and largest freshwater lake (more than 20 percent of the Earth”s fresh surface water by volume). Baikal lies in the deepest continental rift on Earth, and because the rift is geologically active, the tectonic plates continue to move farther apart.

Hope you enjoyed this collection of photos. See you next week for more amazing photos!

TOP 5 MYTHS OF PHOTOGRAPHY EXPOSED !

Being a good photographer in this world is tougher than you think. And there are always people who mess things up for those who want to become good photographers.

I found this article from Picture/Correct about the Top 5 Most Exasperating Photographic Myths, and had to share this with you. Article was written by Cole Dunn. This will certainly make you feel better, if you are trying to really become a good photographer:

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I know, as a photographer, that there are countless misconceptions that non-photographers (and in some cases, even photographers!) don’t quite seem to grasp. From the hundreds I could name, I have narrowed the list to five of the most exasperating misconceptions about photography:

1. Photography is easy

Nothing frustrates me more than when people claim photography is easy. Sure, it’s easy to take a picture; however, being a photographer is more than just taking a picture. It’s an art. It requires experience and skill to take a visually appealing picture. As a photographer, you must understand how lighting works, when to actually take the picture, and MANY more variables to take good photographs. It’s not as easy as what most people think (i.e., taking a ‘selfie’ and chucking a quick filter over it on Instagram).

selfie photography
“Taking a Selfie” captured by Susanne Nilsson

2. “Your camera takes great pictures!”

No, it does not. I take the great picture. My camera is merely a tool that allows me to execute my skills to my highest ability. This is another thing that irritates me. Sure, most of the time, the person delivering this statement means it in a positive way, but I can’t help but take it as more of an insult than anything. It’s essentially dismissing the years of experience, the amount of practice, and my overall skills in photography, and claiming that my camera is the mastermind behind my photographs. So please, if you’re one of those people who thinks the camera itself is the reason for professional photographs, bite your tongue.

Can I also just add that using a more expensive camera does not mean your photographs will be better? You can give an amateur a really expensive, high-standard camera, and it does not mean that their photographs will outperform a professional photographer with a low-budget camera. That said, if you know how to use a high-quality camera and all of its features exquisitely, then maybe this point is not applicable to you.

3. Nikon is better than Canon

Saying Nikon is better than Canon is like saying apples are better than oranges. It’s a completely misleading way of thinking in terms of photography, and (similarly to the previous point) you should refrain from speaking. Basically, Nikon and Canon are both excellent camera brands. However, one might be more suitable for one person, and the other might be more suitable for the other person. The camera choice is all relative to the camera owner. It depends on what exactly you want to do with the camera, and what you want to achieve. Maybe the person making certain claims simply had a negative experience with one of the brands, which is not to say you will have the same experience at all.

nikon and canon cameras
“Untitled” captured by 伊特諾 雷

Instead of taking someone’s word in regards to which camera is better, you should instead do something cool, and that’s called research. The strange thing about research is that you can develop your own perspective of which camera is better and maybe come up with your own conclusions. Research includes looking up reviews of the camera you find appealing and comparing the camera with other cameras you might also have an interest in. You should also take the camera’s price into consideration and see if that price justifies its features.

4. Age is a barrier to success

This is simply far from the truth. Just like music: there is no ‘expiry’ date to being a successful photographer. In fact, how old do you think I am? I could be 90 years old, or I could be 16 years old. I’ll tell you right now that I’m neither of those ages; however, I am somewhere in between.

photographers of all ages
“The Child and the Cameras” captured by Carine Felgueiras

Basically, this point is to disprove the misconception that age is a barrier to success. I know people of all ages, sexes, races, etc. who are extremely passionate about photography. All those things are simply unimportant to their success as photographers.

5. Black-and-white images are better and more professional

Finally, we have come to my favorite point of all: black-and-white photos. Now, don’t get me wrong; black-and-white photos can work really well, but the lack of color does not instantly make them professional. It depends on the photo itself and how the black and white has been executed. However, nothing irritates me more than when people throw on a black-and-white filter and call it photography. There is far more to photography than people understand. If you’re one of these people who think a black-and-white photograph is simply superior, and every other photograph is inferior, I want you to do something for me. Google “black and white photography,” click “Images,” and then compare the first result to your black-and-white image(s). This should probably prove my point that black and white does not necessarily make an image better.

black and white photography
“Rain Bubbles” captured by Chrissie

There you have it—some of the most “you-are-blatantly-misled” misconceptions that a photographer will hear throughout their career/hobby as a photographer. Let’s hope this article can make an impact toward obliterating these insulting misconceptions.

About the Author:
Cole is a writer/photographer who owns his own laboratory… I mean…website at considerphotography, which is chock-a-block full of information about photography.

Before we end this article, I want to add my thoughts to this article:

1- Photography is easy. Oh really, and who is the judge of that? The non photographer. Unfortunately, I do see people who think that, and they jump in to taking photos before they are really prepared to be classified as a photographer. So, they took a few good photos. So what! That does not classify them as a good photographer. When the professional says you need to shoot at least 10,000 photos, and try to learn on all of them, they really mean it. So don’t go out and start taking photos, without the experience behind your belt and start selling “portrait packages” or start shooting weddings. I get so irritated when people just ask their best friend, or uncle to shoot their wedding photos, the photos that should mean the most to a person. Please be smart and don’t go out and try to be a professional photographer without taking the journey first.

A previous photo from “Photos of the Week”…… Author unknown. Notice that this is not some ordinary snapshot taken by a photographer who has been doing this for a year. My guess is this photographer is well seasoned. I can point out a dozen different things to this photo that make it so much better because of experience.

2- That camera takes great photos ! Photography is an art. You are the creator of your best photos. Your best photos can come from a very inexpensive camera, once you have learned composition, post-production, and several other things. The photographer will eventually come to the point that every photo he takes, he seriously thinks about and “creates” as he snaps the shutter.

3-Nikon is better than Canon. Oh, my favorite subject. I have been in the retail camera business for close to 23 years. And you know, these camera manufactures will not be in business today if they were producing bad cameras. And I have found that as I sold different cameras, I could find features on every brand that I sold that I liked. So, what do I own now? It doesn’t really matter. And in fact, when I get around to buying my next camera, it will probably be a different brand than the one I own now. So, take the advice of Mr. Dunn in the article above, and do your own research before you buy a camera. Here is a list of the major camera manufactures today that I feel all have something different to offer:

  • Canon
  • Nikon
  • Pentax
  • Olympus
  • Sony
  • Panasonic
  • Leica
  • Contax
  • Fuji Film

4-Age is a barrier to success. What a nasty myth. There are so many great stories of how some people started their new business at age 67. or became a great photographer by the age of 18. If you are willing to learn, you can be successful at any age.

5- Black and white images are more professional and better than color. I love a good black and white photo, and there is a place for them. But, to say they are better than color is a very strange myth. Here is my rule for black and white: If it can look better or equal to color, then go ahead and make it a black and white photo.

Here is an experiment I did on an old bench, and I thought, when I took this photo, that black and white would be better than color. See what you think:

Color:

Black and White:

It takes practice to see a photo that may look better in black and white than in color. But, in most situations, color could be better than black and white, with the same subject.

So, I hope you learned something from this presentation. Happy shooting !

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: Photos of the Ocean !

Last week we had a great post of amazing photos of Rivers of the world. The response was tremendous. Now, to really add to even more beauty, this week’s Photos of the Week are all about the ocean. So many people in the world love photos taken of the ocean, ocean-side, etc. Here are today’s picks:

seaside
Photo by Fabian Wiktor on Pexels.com
cliffs in sea near coast at sunset
Photo by Sami Anas on Pexels.com
lighthouse
Photo by Lena Khrupina on Pexels.com
ocean water wave photo
Photo by Emiliano Arano on Pexels.com
light sea dawn landscape
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
beach birds calm clouds
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
frozen wave against sunlight
Photo by Hernan Pauccara on Pexels.com
abstract background beach color
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
white and black moon with black skies and body of water photography during night time
Photo by GEORGE DESIPRIS on Pexels.com
beach bench boardwalk clouds
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
shallow focus photo of pink and brown jellyfish
Photo by Pawel Kalisinski on Pexels.com
backlit balance beach cloud
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
cottages in the middle of beach
Photo by Julius Silver on Pexels.com
lighthouse
Photo by Anand Dandekar on Pexels.com
red and blue hot air balloon floating on air on body of water during night time
Photo by Bess Hamiti on Pexels.com
beach during sunset
Photo by Bella White on Pexels.com
white boat beside tree under orange sky during sunset
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
person standing on dirt surrounded by coconut trees
Photo by Oliver Sjöström on Pexels.com
white and gray bird on the bag of brown and black pig swimming on the beach during daytime
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
beach bungalow caribbean jetty
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
white boats on body of water
Photo by Vincent Rivaud on Pexels.com
silhouette photography of boat on water during sunset
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Pexels.com
photo of a turtle underwater
Photo by Belle Co on Pexels.com
blue sea under clear blue sky
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
person laying on sand
Photo by Rebeca Gonçalves on Pexels.com
reflection of clouds on body of water
Photo by Johannes Plenio on Pexels.com
lighthouse during golden hour
Photo by Todd Trapani on Pexels.com