TAMRON LENSES

Photo by Lanny Cottrell – editor

I was recently invited to a Tamron open house at one of the local Photo Stores: Allen’s Camera in Layton, Utah. I think that it is always fun to go to these shows to see and handle the merchandise. The rep was very informative and loves his job. He gave great details into the Tamron World. Let’s take a look at Tamron in detail now.

HISTORY OF TAMRON:

Kabushiki-gaisha Tamuron) is a Japanese company manufacturing photographic lenses, optical components and commercial/industrial-use optics. Tamron Headquarters is located in Saitama City in the Saitama prefecture of Japan.

The name of the company came from the surname of Uhyoue Tamura who was instrumental in developing Tamron’s optical technologies. It was only on the company’s 20th anniversary that the name was changed to Tamron (from Taisei Optical).

In the fiscal year ending 31 December 2017, net sales totaled 60.496 billion yen and operating income was 4.24 billion yen, up 79.8% from 2016. At that time, the consolidated company had 4,640 employees and five production plants: in Hirosaki, Namioka and Owani in Japan, and one in China and Viet Nam, respectively.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TODAY:

In the lens processing, in order to manufacture a lens with the required performance, various conditions need to be adjusted by selecting the machine used for manufacturing and adjusting the polishing time according to the magnitude of curvature and the characteristics of the material.
For example, high-pixilation and high-definition are yearly advanced in CMOS image sensor used in cameras and a lens surface-roughness, unevenness or waviness negatively effects the lens imaging performance.
To enable a highly accurate lens, Tamron reflect a simulation result to a processing accuracy from the optical designing stage.
Tamron’s lens processing technology is covering a wide range, multiple lens bonding with curved surfaces, processing with plane lens and prism lens, and prism lens bonding with each other. From now on, as a new usage, optical lens is expected to be used with laser and to be required a complicated irregular shape or prism shape integrating various technologies.
To produce multifarious lenses required in the future, Tamron is newly developing and improving the processing technology and handing down its established expertise by cooperating the lens processing know-how and the optical development technology.

To say that Tamron has a lot of different lenses is an understatement, but what they are truly proud of is their amazing zoom lenses. When I was at the Tamron show at the local photo dealer the other day, I was amazed with this lens, and I think it’s the one they are most proud of too:

Go to extremes with the world’s first* 22.2x ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom.

Introducing the world’s first ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens for the APS-C format. With a focal length range of 18-400mm and 22.2x zoom, it has an ultra-telephoto range equivalent to 620mm in the 35mm format. This brings distant subjects closer, while providing perspective-flattening effects that are only possible with an extreme telephoto lens. Plus it offers exceptional optical performance across the entire zoom range—from wide angle to ultra-telephoto. With this new lens—and its Moisture-Resistant Construction—Tamron brings the art of photography to the joy of travel. Now you can use the same lens to shoot everything from stunning landscapes and neon-lit cities to detailed portraits and delicate flora. The ultra-telephoto range makes it just as easy to photograph animals and sports. And with a maximum magnification ratio of 1:2.9, you can even enjoy tele-macro photography.

That was the part that I thought was so incredible is this lens macro ratio is 1:2.9! And you get that macro ratio even at 400mm! That opens out amazing possibilities for every photographer.

ANOTHER MOST AMAZING LENS I FELL IN LOVE WITH: TAMRON’S 11-20MM ZOOM LENS:

If you have the urge to shoot landscapes, then this lens is for you. Take a look at this video:

TAMRON MAKES A LOT OF LENSES

If you go to Tamron’s website, and browse around you will discover that they make a lot of lenses. It’s these few lenses I have highlighted today are the ones I think Tamron has excelled at.

ONE MORE LENS TO HIGHLIGHT: 150-500MM LENS:

And one more video to go with this incredible lens:

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PART 2: UNDERSTANDING THE NUMBERS ON LENSES:

HERE WE GO! UNDERSTANDING ALL THOSE NUMBERS

You have your new camera, and so far you like it. Now it’s time to look at adding more lenses to your equipment. Not sure what all those numbers mean? That is what we are here for!

WHAT DOES THE FIRST SET OF NUMBERS MEAN?

As you look at the top of your lens, or the front of your lens, the very first set of numbers, or number, tells you what the focal length of your lens is. For example the photo above show the focal length of your lens to be: 24-105mm. How does that equate to anything? Here is your reference point:

A normal lens is one who’s focal-length is equal to the diagonal of the sensor or film. This is said to give a natural perspective similar to that of a single human eye.

On a full-frame DSLR, it is usually a 50mm lens. On a cropped-sensor (APS-C) DSLR, a normal lens falls around 35mm but from 30 to 55mm, it would still be considered normal. For Four-Thirds and Micro Four-Thirds, you would use a 25mm. Usually most manufacturers make sure to have one bright prime that corresponds to the normal focal-length for the sensor-size.

Then going back to the lens above, let’s suppose your camera is a DSLR camera. The normal lens would then be about 30mm. If you were to look through the lens, it would appear that the image is the same size as what you see, without the camera. Then, if you go below the number 30mm you enter the range of wide angle lenses. Which means that the lens pushing the image back further to get more into the picture.

Definition of “WIDE ANGLE LENS”

(Photography) a lens system on a camera that can cover an angle of view of 60° or more and therefore has a fairly small focal length. Any number that is less than 30 is therefore a wide angle lens.

Definition of “telephoto” lens:

A telephoto lens is a lens that appears to magnify distant objects. To do that, they need to have a focal length longer than that of a normal lens, or a lens that approximates the optical qualities of the human eye. A normal lens has a focal length of 30mm on a full frame camera so any lens with a focal length longer than 30mm can be considered a telephoto lens. The longer the focal length, the more magnification there is.

WHAT IS THE PROPER USE OF WIDE ANGLE AND TELEPHOTO LENSES:

Generally, a normal lens (around 30mm) is used for…. normal everyday use. Photos of the family, the dog, the cat, the things around the house.

A wide angle lens is most popular for landscape or scenic photos, to get the whole picture into the frame.

And the telephoto is generally used to bring objects in closer to you. The most common use is for wildlife, sports, and things from afar.

NEXT SET OF NUMBERS:

CANON ZOOM LENS WITH ALL THE NUMBERS.

THE “APERTURE RANGE”

Every lens has an aperture in it. It controls the amount of light getting through the lens. This has another major function that photographers really use and that is the “depth of field”. That has been discussed before in a previous blog. JUST : CLICK HERE

It is usually expressed in f-stops such as f/1.4 and stated on the name of the lens. For example, the Nikon 35mm f/1.4G lens has a maximum aperture of f/1.4, whereas the Nikon 50mm f/1.8G has a maximum aperture of f/1.8.

One lens, and several different aperture openings:

Here is where it can get interesting and you can see why the price of a lens goes up. Listed below is a list of Nikon lenses. And they are all 50mm lenses. You can see the Nikkor lens 50mm F1.8 lens lists for only $134.95. Now go to the second lone on the list: Nikkor 50mm 1.4D lens. It sells for $369.95. And go to the top one: the 50mm f1.2 lens sells for $724.95.

50mmf/1.2NIKKOR 50mm f/1.2FXM$724.95Get a quick view for the NIKKOR 50mm f/1.2
50mmf/1.4AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4DFXAF$369.95Get a quick view for the AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D
50mmf/1.4AF-S NIKKOR 50mm F1.4GFXAF-S$449.95Get a quick view for the AF-S NIKKOR 50mm F1.4G
50mmf/1.4NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4FXM$469.95Get a quick view for the NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4
50mmf/1.8AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8DFXAF$134.95

The difference between each 50 mm lens is that the f1.4 lens lets in almost twice the amount of light through it than the f1.8 lens. I don’t know how many actual lens elements are in each lens, but, say they have 14 elements in the lens. That would mean the f1.4 lens elements, all 14 of them have to be made larger than the f1.8 lens. But if you are a person who wants the lens to be able to shoot in lower light, then the f1.4 lens is a better choice. Better still, the f1.2 which doubles the amount of light transmission would even be better. But you would end up paying for all those elements in the lens housing to be bigger than the previous version.

So, in summary on this number, the lens with the smallest number, let’s a lot more light through the lens than a lens with a bigger number. And that allows you to also have a depth of field even smaller, but, the usual case for having a lens with a lower aperture number is usually to allow you to shoot in lower light.

THE LAST IMPORTANT NUMBER:

Most lenses have this important number on it. It is a 2 digit number with a circle and a line through that circle.

THE FINAL IMPORTANT NUMBER TO KNOW IS THE FILTER SIZE THE LENS TAKES.

On this photo above, all lenses (at least I think almost all lenses) have a number to tell you what size filter this lens takes or the size of the lens cap. If you are a photographer who uses filters (and I think all photographers should use filters), you will appreciate knowing what size filters you would need to enhance your photography. On this lens above, the filter size is a 72mm. That is a big filter, but certainly good to know. If you would like to learn more about using filters, CLICK HERE AND one more link: CLICK THIS ONE TOO

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NIKON TO OFFER 50 NEW “Z” LENSES BY 2025

Nikkor lenses are some of the best and have a huge variety of lenses

We are going to see a huge new surge in lenses within the next few years. All because so many of the brands of cameras changed their lens mount. Why? Because they changed from a DSLR camera, which uses lenses that are about the same size as the older 35mm film cameras, to the smaller mirrorless cameras which made it so the lenses mount, and the lenses went smaller. And that means what was good with one type of lens mount, they will now need to do the same thing to the smaller lens mounts, such as the new NIKON Z camera series.

NIKON Z LENSES NOW

As of this writing, Nikon makes about 27 lenses already for their Z camera series. So, that means they will release about 23 more lenses in the next few years. It is amazing how many lenses need to be created to accomplish all the different types of photography there is (Hmmm, that might be a good blog subject).

7 New lenses are about to be released soon:

With that being said, it is obvious that they have some already announced or rumored to be releases soon:

  • A 12-28mm DX zoom
  • A 200-600mm super-telephoto zoom
  • A 24mm DX lens
  • A 26mm lens
  • An 85mm S-line lens
  • A 400mm S-line lens
  • A 600mm S-line lens

Of course, that leaves many future lenses unaccounted for, though I’d certainly wager that we’ll get a 70-200mm f/4 lens, designed as a low-cost 70-200mm f/2.8 alternative. Look for a 500mm f/4 S-line lens, designed for bird and wildlife photographers, and several wider primes (including, perhaps, a 14mm f/2.8 and/or a 35mm f/1.4).

Once Nikon has covered all its more “conventional” bases, keep an eye out for the specialty lenses: fisheye lenses and zoom lenses, additional macro prime lenses, and tilt shift lenses. In the meantime, Nikon mirrorless shooters can still gain access to basic and specialty models via the FTZ adapters.

HOW DOES THIS COMPARE TO THEIR COMPETITORS: CANON AND SONY?

CANON; Canon currently has 25 lenses in their RF series of lenses. The RF lenses are the lenses Canon makes for their smaller mirrorless cameras. And they are planning on releasing about 30 more in the next 5 years. That should complete their lineup.

SONY: Well, Sony has had a head start on their lens lineup for about the last 7 years. So they already have about 70 lenses for their mirrorless cameras. Sony hasn’t shown any signs of slowing down, either, so for now – and for the foreseeable future – Sony will continue to lead the pack.

Sony is already ahead of the game with close to 70 lenses in their lineup.

HOW TO PICK AND CHOOSE A LENS:

I was looking through my arsenal of information I have available, but the best one is in my professional course, that describes how lenses can be used, what millimeter lenses are the best, etc. Go to my professional course titled “BASIC PHOTO COURSE”, and it is here at this link. Click here.

NOW WHAT WILL YOU DO TO

If you are serious about photography, you will want to get some extra lenses for your tools. It is amazing how your photography can be enhanced with a variety of lenses. You can choose a lens for the following reasons:

  • A wide angle lens for taking breathtaking landscapes
  • A macro lens for taking pictures close-up
  • A telephoto lens to get photos of wildlife
  • A fast lens to be able to shoot in low light
  • A fisheye lens to get almost a 180 degree view
  • A lens to take the perfect portrait
  • And so many other types of subjects.

Coming next blog: learn why there are so many different lenses, what makes a lens cost more than others, what are the different uses of lenses? Complete instruction on lenses and their uses.

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NEW OLYMPUS CO. INTRODUCES FIRST LENS:

The new Olympus OM System Company introduces a new 20mm 1.4 lens

It’s officially time to stop calling it “Olympus” kit – the first ever product to be launched under the new OM System brand is the M.Zuiko 20mm f/1.4 Pro lens. 

First announced in September, the Olympus OM System M.Zuiko 20mm f/1.4 Pro is the manufacturer’s first ever f/1.4 lens, bridging the gap between its ultra-compact line of f/1.8 Premium primes and the ultra-fast line of f/1.2 Pro glass. 

And just a perfect lens to introduce. A 20mm 1.4 lens is the perfect lens for those who want to shoot in low light. And a wide angle to boot, this is going to be a good one.

TECHNICAL DETAILS:

At 63.4 x 61.7mm and 247g, the OM System M.Zuiko 20mm f/1.4 Pro is considerably smaller and lighter than the 17mm f/1.2 and 25mm f/1.2 Pro lenses – and it’s even smaller than the Olympus M.Zuiko 12-45mm f/4 Pro (which the manufacturer infamously pointed out weighs about as much as a large apple), and shares the same 58mm filter thread.  

A 40mm equivalent lens in full-frame / 35mm terms, the 20mm f/1.4 sits comfortably between existing the 17mm (35mm equivalent) and 25mm (50mm) options in the M.Zuiko lineup. 

With a closest focusing distance of 0.25m, it’s a great all-purpose optic for travel, street photography, landscapes and everyday shooting – especially with its IPX1 weather sealing.

AMAZING LENSES INSTALLED, THIS ONE IS SHARP!

Its optical formula features 11 high-quality elements in 10 groups including 1 Super ED (extra-low dispersion) lens, 3 ED lenses, 2 Super HR (high refractive) lenses and 2 Aspherical lenses). 

And to make it even more exciting to see it in action, they have provided us with a video. CHECK IT OUT:

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Want to learn about a particular subject in photography? Try out this amazing new search system. Just type in your subject, and watch the links appear. I have close to 1500 blogs done, and none are the same. You may find several blogs on the subject you want to know about. Try it:

FIRST GLIMPSE OF CANON’S NEW 3D VR LENS

Add a whole new dimension to your story with the RF5.2mm F2.8 L Dual Fisheye lens. As part of the EOS VR System – this lens paired with the EOS R5 updated with firmware 1.5.0 or higher and one of Canon’s VR software solutions – you can create immersive 3D that can be experienced when viewed on compatible head mount displays including the Oculus Quest 2 and more.* Viewers will be able to take in the scene with a vivid, wide field of view by simply moving their head. This is the world’s first digital interchangeable lens that can capture stereoscopic 3D 180° VR imagery to a single image sensor.*^ Now, creators can go from traditional stills or video shooting to stereoscopic 3D capture with a simple lens swap. The pairing of this lens and the EOS R5 camera brings high resolution video recording at up to 8K DCI 30p and 4K DCI 60p. With a beautifully engineered folded optical design, the dual high-performance L-series fisheye lenses combine imagery onto a single image sensor delivering impressive results to a single file. This can help simplify your workflow by eliminating the need to sync and stitch multiple video files. An integral part of the EOS VR System, Canon’s EOS VR Utility software can easily convert footage to your choice of editing software. For Adobe® Premiere Pro® users, the EOS VR Plug-in software can help streamline your editing process. Both paid subscription-based software solutions (currently in development with availability and details to follow on or about early 2022) allow for convenient post-production.

SEE WHAT THE IMAGE LOOKS LIKE WITH THIS VIDEO…. AND MAKE SURE YOU WATCH IT TO THE END:

With this lens paired with an EOS R5 camera, creatives, industry professionals and newcomers to VR can create an immersive experience, capturing dynamic scenes for entertainment, tourism, training & education, real estate, storytelling or anywhere you want to bring your audience to.

“PENTAX CAMERAS” – IT’S HISTORY AND STORY TODAY:

Photo by Marc Kleen on Unsplash

Ahhh, the mighty PENTAX camera! This is another camera manufacture with a rich history, and a major contributor to the photographic world. The one thing I do know is that it was the very first camera from Japan, as an SLR using 35mm film. Let’s show you the details from Wikipedia:

The company was founded as Asahi Kogaku Goshi Kaisha in November 1919 by Kumao Kajiwara, at a shop in the Toshima suburb of Tokyo, and began producing spectacle lenses (which it still manufactures).[4] In 1938 it changed its name to Asahi Optical Co., Ltd. (旭光学工業株式会社, Asahi Kōgaku Kōgyō Kabushiki-gaisha), and by this time it was also manufacturing camera/cine lenses. In the lead-up to World War II, Asahi Optical devoted much of its time to fulfilling military contracts for optical instruments. At the end of the war, Asahi Optical was disbanded by the occupying powers, being allowed to re-form in 1948. The company resumed its pre-war activities, manufacturing binoculars and consumer camera lenses for Konishiroku and Chiyoda Kōgaku Seikō (later Konica and Minolta respectively).

Vintage Asahi Pentax camera Canvas Print by Dani Delca | Society6
An old Pentax Spotmatic. One of their most reliable and popular cameras. Used a screw mount lens.

In 1952 Asahi Optical introduced its first camera, the Asahiflex (the first Japanese SLR using 35mm film). The name “Pentax” was originally a registered trademark of the East German VEB Zeiss Ikon (from “Pentaprism” and “Contax“) and acquired by the Asahi Optical company in 1957. Since then the company has been primarily known for its photographic products, distributed 35mm equipment under the name “Asahi Pentax” and medium format 120 6x7cm equipment under the sub brand “Pentax 6×7” (from 1969 to 1990) and “Pentax 67” (from 1990 to 1999). Equipment was exported to the United States from the 1950s until the mid-1970s by Honeywell Corporation and branded as “Heiland Pentax” and later “Honeywell Pentax”. The company was renamed Pentax Corporation in 2002. It was one of the world’s largest optical companies, producing still cameras, binoculars, spectacle lenses, and a variety of other optical instruments. In 2004, Pentax had about 6000 employees.

Photo by Ben Grant on Unsplash

Merger with Hoya

In December 2006, Pentax started the process of merging with Hoya Corporation to form ‘Hoya Pentax HD Corporation’.[6] Hoya’s primary goal was to strengthen its medical-related business by taking advantage of Pentax’s technologies and expertise in the field of endoscopes, intraocular lenses, surgical loupes, biocompatible ceramics, etc. It was speculated that Pentax’s camera business could be sold off after the merger. A stock swap was to be completed by October 1, 2007, but the process was called off on April 11, 2007. Pentax president Fumio Urano resigned over the matter, with Takashi Watanuki taking over as president of Pentax.[7] However, despite Watanuki’s previously stated opposition to a Hoya merger, on May 16 it was reported that Pentax had accepted “with conditions” a sweetened offer from Hoya, according to a source familiar with the matter.[8] Pentax was under increasing pressure from its major shareholders, Sparx Asset Management in particular, to accept Hoya’s bid.

On August 6, 2007, Hoya completed a friendly public tender offer for Pentax and acquired 90.59% of the company.[9] On August 14, 2007, the company became a consolidated subsidiary of Hoya. On October 29, 2007, Hoya and Pentax announced that Pentax would merge with and into Hoya effective on March 31, 2008.[10] Hoya closed the Pentax-owned factory in Tokyo, and moved all manufacturing facilities to Cebu, Philippines and Hanoi, Vietnam.[11]

Ricoh Imaging Company

Japanese optical glass-maker Hoya Corporation stated on July 1, 2011, that it would sell its Pentax camera business to copier and printer maker Ricoh, in a deal the Nikkei business daily reported was worth about 10 billion yen ($124.2 million).[12] On July 29, 2011, Hoya transferred its Pentax imaging systems business to a newly established subsidiary called Pentax Imaging Corporation. On October 1, 2011, Ricoh acquired all shares of Pentax Imaging Corp. and renamed the new subsidiary Pentax Ricoh Imaging Company, Ltd.[13] Hoya will continue to use the Pentax brand name for their medical related products such as endoscopes. On August 1, 2013, the company name was changed to Ricoh Imaging Company Ltd.

camera photography vintage technology
Photo by Francesco Frilli on Pexels.com

The corporation is best known for its “Pentax” brand cameras, starting with the pivotal “Asahi Pentaxsingle-lens reflex camera of 1957. Asahi’s first series of cameras, the Asahiflex of 1952, had been the first Japanese-made SLRs for 35mm film, and the Asahiflex IIB of 1954 the first Japanese SLR with an instant-return mirror. The Asahi Pentax itself was the first Japanese fixed-pentaprism SLR. In 1969 under the sub-brand “Pentax 6×7”, the company started to produce medium format 120 6x7cm cameras. In 1990 the company renamed the sub-brand from “Pentax 6×7” to “Pentax 67”. The company produced Pentax 67 cameras until 1999 and ceased distribution in 2002. The success of the “Pentax” series was such that the business eventually renamed itself “Pentax Corporation” after the 35mm product line. Although the corporation ultimately merged into Hoya Corporation, it eventually was purchased by Ricoh, which continues to develop and market digital cameras under the Pentax brand. Currently, Pentax DSLRs are manufactured in Cebu, Philippines, while digital Pentax lenses are manufactured in Hanoi, Vietnam, under Pentax Ricoh Imaging Products.

When you think of “professional cameras”, a few come in mind. But when you talk about the ultimate in qualilty, with a bigger sensor than all the rest, there are only a few that fit this title. Hasselblad, Fuji Film, and Pentax. Here is the “Medium format” camera:

Click on the picture above to get details from Amazon about this unique camera (or purchase it too, if you want). A bigger body, with a bigger sensor, and bigger lenses. In this world of everything going smaller, there are a few that choose to give you the advantage of “big”.

As far as Professional DSLR cameras, Ones that fall in that category are: Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Sony, Olympus and have the price points to do that too.

Here is link to show you the new Pentax K-3 Mark III. They have also done something unique that not ever other manufacture did. Notice they have made this top of the line model in “Silver”, and made a matching lens to go with it. Certainly a collector camera.

Different ideas for each manufacture, and a first comes through Pentax. I currently have an older camera, and the ISO setting, I believe goes up to 3200 ISO. Pentax has gone way out and has a setting on their Pentax K3 Mark III with an incredible ISO from 100 to 1,600,000 ISO. No other camera has that capability. Do you really want to shoot with that high ISO? Probably not, but, at 250,000 ISO it’s not too bad.

Pentax smc Pentax-DA 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 ED SDM Lens 21497 B&H
18-270mm SMC lens from Pentax

In 1971, PENTAX made an innovative advancement in optical technology by increasing the number of coating layers from two — the norm at the time — to as many as seven.

Since then, lenses with the prefix “smc PENTAX” have been preferred by many photo enthusiasts. With the advancement of production technologies and camera digitalization, PENTAX’s multi-layer coating technology has continued to evolve to meet the demands of the times.

A Guide to the Best Pentax Camera Lenses - Reviewed
Pentax was one of the first major manufactures to provide their cameras in different colors.

5 reasons to pick Pentax:

COMPLETE DUSTPROOF
& WEATHER-RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION
MOUNT COMPATIBILITY FOR
USING SUPERB OLDER LENSES
A COMPACT, LIGHTWEIGHT DESIGN
WITH BUILT-IN SHAKE REDUCTION
TOTALLY FOCUSED ON
IMAGE & PRODUCT DESIGN
WITH ALL SLR MODELS
USER INTERFACE DESIGNED
FOR SUPERB USABILITY

Today, Pentax makes one of the widest variety of cameras on the market. All the way from the:

To the medium format DSLR:

If we told you that Japan’s favorite camera brand is Canon, you’d believe us. The same if we said it was Nikon or Sony. You might even believe us if we told you that Japan’s most beloved brand is Olympus, or Fujifilm. But no… in fact, Japan’s favorite camera brand is Pentax / Ricoh. 

That’s according to the latest results in a survey being conducted by IT Media, asking Japanese consumers to choose their favorite digital camera maker. And despite the best Pentax cameras all being DSLRs, and facing quite a technological disparity compared to the likes of the best Canon cameras and best Sony cameras, that hasn’t stopped Ricoh being Japan’s most beloved brand in the camera industry. 

THE “OLYMPUS CAMERA”, IT’S HISTORY AND STORY TODAY:

One of the famous models of cameras from OLYMPUS!

I mentioned in a previous blog, that while working for a camera story for over 20 years, I have sold myself on every brand, and actually owned almost every brand of camera. I think they all have some qualities that make them highly favored by a wide range of photographers.

I have owned one of the Olympus pro cameras (The OM-1), and loved this camera. It was a total manual camera, and I found out that if there was any bad photos, it wasn’t the cameras fault. The camera was built well, and I felt proud to own this camera.

The history of Olympus Cameras also goes back quite a while. From Wikipedia, here is a summary of Olympus, the company and the equipment:

Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash

In 1936, Olympus introduced its first camera, the Semi-Olympus I, fitted with the first Zuiko-branded lens.[8] The Olympus Chrome Six was a series of folding cameras made by Takachiho, and later Olympus, from 1948 to 1956, for 6×4.5 cm or 6×6 cm exposures on 120 film.

The first innovative camera series from Olympus was the Pen, launched in 1959. It used a half-frame format, taking 72 18×24 mm photographs on a standard 36-exposure 35mm film cassette,[9] which made Pen cameras compact and portable for their time.

The Pen system design team, led by Yoshihisa Maitani, later created the OM system, a full-frame professional 35mm SLR system designed to compete with Nikon and Canon’s bestsellers. The OM system introduced a new trend towards more compact cameras and lenses, being much smaller than its competitors and presenting innovative design features such as off-the-film (OTF) metering and OTF flash automation. Eventually the system included 14 different bodies, approximately 60 Zuiko-branded lenses, and numerous camera accessories.

Olympus Quick Flash camera

In 1983, Olympus, along with Canon, branded a range of video recording equipment manufactured by JVC,[citation needed] and called it “Olympus Video Photography”, even employing renowned photographer Terance Donovan to promote the range.[citation needed] A second version of the system was available the year after, but this was Olympus’ last foray into the world of consumer video equipment until digital cameras became popular.

Photo by Abrahan Echeverria on Unsplash

Tsuyoshi Kikukawa, who was later to become president of Olympus, foresaw the demand for the digital SLR, and is credited with the company’s strategy in digital photography. He fought for commitment by Olympus to enter the market in high-resolution photographic products. As a result of his efforts, Olympus released an 810,000-pixel digital camera for the mass market in 1996, when the resolution of rivals’ offerings was less than half.[10] The next year, Olympus hit the market with a 1.41 million pixel camera. By 2001, the company’s annual turnover from digital photography was in excess of ¥100 billion.[10] Olympus manufactures compact digital cameras and is the designer of the Four Thirds system standard for digital single-lens reflex cameras. Olympus’ Four-Thirds system flagship DSLR camera is the E-5, released in 2010. Olympus is also the largest manufacturer of Four-Thirds lenses, under the Zuiko Digital brand. After the introduction of the Micro Four Thirds system, and the general market growth of the Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Cameras, the regular Four Thirds system became neglected. Then, in 2017, after three years without a new lens, and seven years without a new body, Olympus officially discontinued the Four Thirds system.

Olympus E-5

Olympus and Panasonic started a new development together, called the Micro Four Thirds system. It was an interchangeable lens system, with the Four Thirds sensor size, and no mirrors (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera). The lack of mirrors allowed the camera body to be a lot smaller than that of a DSLR, while maintaining its image quality and the interchangeability of the lenses. The first product in the Micro Four Thirds system was the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1, released in 2008. The first Olympus-branded MFT camera was the Olympus PEN E-P1. Because it was very expensive, they made a cheaper option, called the Olympus PEN Lite E-PL1. The market growth of the MILC cameras made Olympus introduce a new series in their lineup, which was the modern, digital implementation of the legendary OM series, the OM-D. It maintained the Micro Four Thirds system, but added a built-in electronic viewfinder, a more ergonomic button layout packaged in a retro style chassis. The first model in this family was the E-M5, released in 2012. Since then, Olympus has developed their two lines (PEN and OM-D) and the Micro Four Thirds system, still alongside Panasonic. The latest Olympus camera is the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV as of August 20, 2020.

Olympus recently agreed the sale of its imaging division, but its cameras and lenses will continue to be manufactured, sold and serviced by new company OM Digital Solutions (which Olympus retains an ownership stake in). Still, you might be wondering whether you should still consider buying an Olympus camera – and as far as we’re concerned, you definitely should!

The flagship camera of Olympus was meant to rival the top of the line cameras from Nikon, Canon, Fuji, Pentax, and any others. It’s features are phenomenal and in some cases blow away all the other brands. Features like:

  • Like a motor drive that will shoot at 60 frames per second in continuous mode
  • Tight weatherproof seals, means you can take this anywhere, in any weather condition
  • 7.0 EV stops of image stabilization to lose the shakiness you might have in holding the camera still.
  • 50MP sensor that is crazy good.
  • Lightweight, yet built to take abuse.
  • Zuiko lenses from Olympus are some of the best in the world.
  • 4K Video shooting, also makes this an ideal video camera
  • Built-in WI-FI and blue tooth

If you want to get in to serious photography, then Olympus will be one worth considering.

Now, if you would take a moment and fill out this form, whether you own an Olympus, Nikon, or whatever, we will keep you posted on your email about the news of your camera, lenses, accessories, etc. Something that may help you to enjoy the camera system you have, regardless of the brand:

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK BEST OF WILD ANIMAL PHOTOS

Photo by Syed Ahmad on Unsplash

What is the definition of “wild Animals”? In the scope of what we are doing for this “Photos of the Week” anything that is not considered a pet, is a wild animal. Now as we put together this collection of the latest wild animal photos, the question will come up: “were these taken at the zoo?” And, there is no way that I can tell, unless I see that the animals look like they are in a zoo. So, I will try to keep these wild animal photos…WILD! Enjoy!

Photo by Federico Di Dio photography on Unsplash
Photo by Ian Parker on Unsplash ——- Juvenile king penguins under a dramatic sky

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Photo by ray rui on Unsplash ——- One of the 5 kings in Africa
Photo by Geran de Klerk on Unsplash ——— The locals call him Cyrus. I was lucky enough to get a stare-down from him on an afternoon safari in the Kruger National Park. What an amazing creature and moment.
Photo by Rohan Makhecha on Unsplash ————- While driving along the Bow Valley Parkway in Banff I came across this beautiful herd of Rams.

A RECENT POLL QUESTIONED PEOPLE WHO WERE INTERESTED IN PHOTOGRAPHY, TO FIND OUT WHAT SUBJECTS OF PHOTOGRAPHY THEY WOULD LIKE TO LEARN. AND THEY CAME UP WITH 51 PHOTO SUBJECTS, INCLUDING TAKING PICTURES OF BOOKS, A MEAL YOU’VE EATEN, ARCHITECTURE AND A WHOLE LOT MORE. I AM GOING TO DO A SPECIAL BLOG ON ALL 51 SUBJECTS FOR EVERY PHOTOGRAPHER TO LEARN. THESE 51 SUBJECTS WILL BE POSTED FOR A LIMITED TIME, SO, MAKE SURE YOU YOU READ THOSE BLOGS DAILY NOW. JUST GO TO http://WWW.123PHOTOGO.COM . WE WILL BE HALF WAY THROUGH THESE BY THE END OF THIS WEEK. A LIST OF ALL SUBJECTS IS POSTED BELOW:

Photo by Dennis Buchner on Unsplash ——— This otter popped out of a hole in the ice with this sucker and ran across the ice and slid into another hole and disappeared
Here is the list of subjects of different photographic subjects. At this point I have done all the left side except for “An Insect” which I will do tomorrow (Thursday 7/8/2021). These will be left for all to read for only 1 month after I have finished them all, and then all of them will be ready to be put in a book for all to have for their own personal learning.
Photo by Bruno Ramos Lara on Unsplash
Photo by joel herzog on Unsplash
Buffalo grazing on what good grass is available. ——- Photo by Lanny Cottrell Photography —– Antelope Island, Utah
Photo by Harshil Gudka on Unsplash ——– The Matriarch – covered with mud.
Photo by Hu Chen on Unsplash ——- The king of the jungle has something to say!
It’s easier to scratch your behind, when you have big antlers to reach it with. Photo by Aaron Cottrell – —– Photo taken in Yellowstone National Park.
Photo by Magdalena Kula Manchee on Unsplash ———- Giraffes crossing heads taken on safari in Tamzania.
Photo by Anna Mircea on Unsplash
Photo by Subhadip Kanjilal on Unsplash ——- The eye of a hunter
Photo by Kerin Gedge on Unsplash ——— Yet another Australian Water Dragon to add to my collection.
closeup photography of wold lying on ground
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
close up of rabbit on field
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
brown squirrel on gray tree trunk
Photo by Maddie Franz on Pexels.com
Come back again tomorrow, as we go through the 51 subjects about photography. Tomorrow will be on the subject of: Insect photography. And then we will be half way done with the list.