HOW TO TAKE A PHOTO OF A CAT OR KITTEN:

black and white kitten on brown textile
Photo by Francesco Ungaro on Pexels.com
51 different subjects for photography! And I am going to do them all. Today’s subject is on learning how to take photos of cats or kittens. Let’s do it:
selective focus photography of brown and black tabby cat
Photo by Eliza Lensa on Pexels.com

Taking pictures of a cat vs. a kitten is two different things in my eye. It’s like taking a photo of an adult vs. a toddler. If you don’t get a chuckle out of what kitten’s do, then you are missing all the fun of cat ownership. You get to play with a kitten, and they love playing with you. And to find their cute posing in a photograph is usually not hard. There are a couple of tips I would recommend in taking photos of cats or kittens:

  • Get a cat to look at the camera by making noises by the camera. They are a curious animal and want to know what’s going on.
photo of gray and white tabby kitten sitting on sofa
Photo by Tranmautritam on Pexels.com
  • Be patient and be prepared for the unexpected. These animals are going to give you a pose or doing something amazing in the flash of a second.
shallow focus photography of cat
Photo by Tranmautritam on Pexels.com
  • Set your focus always for the eyes. It’s the eyes that reveal the character of humans as well as animals. Especially if you are going to do a close-up of your pet.
orange tabby cat on brown knitted textile
Photo by Alena Koval on Pexels.com
  • Use a fast shutter speed to capture the fun movements and action of your pet. Using a fast shutter speed stops action. Also, consider using a “continuous motor drive” setting so that you can take a series of rapid photos of the cat, when they are in play mode.
white cat on brown grass
Photo by Muaz AJ on Pexels.com
  • Try to get down on their level to take your photos. A picture of the top of their body all the time, is a boring photo. Get down to their level, and get different perspectives, will make your photos better.
gray cat on floor
Photo by Inge Wallumrød on Pexels.com
  • Try to get close to the pet and fill the frame of your camera. If you are taking a photo of your pet, why are you also taking a photo of your kitchen? Get in close, fill the frame with your cat.
brown tabby cat lying on concrete floor
Photo by Ola Dapo on Pexels.com

Conclusion:

When you take a moment to look at your cat or kitten, make sure you take lots of great photos. I think that the best photos are the ones where you catch their fun character, and that may involve you getting down on the floor with them. Enjoy their cute things they do, because all kittens grow up to be cats. Taking lots of photos will get you some pictures you will be happy with if you follow these suggestions listed above.

Or, just click on cat toys to see the huge variety of toys for cats that is available.

THE ART OF TELLING A STORY WITH JUST ONE PHOTO:

There is an art in making a story out of your photos. Let’s learn some steps how:

Photography is an art in itself. It has many different categories that a photographer can choose to become good at. You can become a good portrait or wedding photographer, or you could be a master at scenery and landscapes. We recently had a blog on how to take good street photos. In a way, street photography is very close to being a “story telling” category. You will often take photos of people on the street, and sometimes as you look at these photos, you tend to try to figure out what that person is doing on the street. Are they just going to work, are they feeling sad, and you can see the anxiety in their face. So, let’s take a look at taking photos, just to tell a story.

Story telling with your photos involve bringing out feelings of the viewer:

This photo above could be so different, but it tells a story, one that makes you figure out what the child is doing, and picturing in your mind, what kind of mess she has made. You could have taken a photo of just the girl, doing nothing, or just posing for a portrait, or you could have taken a photo of her art. But, when you get a great photo of a child in action, it becomes a “story telling” portrait. Would you hang this on your wall? Absolutely. What is the reaction of the viewer? It’s: “Oh my gosh, this girl is so cute”. And people will love the action or playtime she is involved in.

Finding a person in any mood gets your mind going into the story:
Photo by Ben Hershey on Unsplash

Want to really capture a mood, or story with a picture, pick something sad. Looking at the picture above, what do you feel? What is going on with this man? Did something happen to him? When you look at a photo, and questions come up as to what has happened or why is this person this way, is a great “story Telling” Photo.

Can you tell a story with Landscape or Scenery photography?
Photo by Nagy Arnold on Unsplash

Moody or eerie landscape photos is probably the more popular ways to produce a “story telling” photo. What happened when this photo was taken to create such a mood? Why is the lighting that way? Why is there not more light? Why did the photographer create such a photo? See how it can get your mind wondering why, and what is going on. This type of photo will create the best “story telling” photos.

Certain animal photos will create a real feeling from within:
Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash

I think this type of photo of your pet, tells people more of what the character is of your pet. Yes, you can spend hours getting “portrait” type of photos of your pet, but, the type of photos you see, where the pet is engaged in their favorite thing is the perfect type of “telling a Story”.

Photo by Андрей Курган on Unsplash
Conclusion:

Look around yourself and find different ideas of how to create a “Photo Story”. Watch and see the reaction of your clients, or friends and neighbors. Photography needs to change from the ordinary. Think about “Telling a Story” with your photos!

Article written by Lanny Cottrell, for 123PhotoGo. Photos compliments of “Unsplash”.